19 episodes

As kids of immigrants from Taiwan, our Asian identity started with beef noodle soup and ended with Chinese school. Now that we’re adults, we’ve found that we still have a lot to learn about Taiwan’s history and its unique culture. Cousins Annie Wang and Angela Yu share their journey as they discover their family’s heritage and celebrate Taiwanese culture in the context of the Asian American experience.

Hearts in Taiwan Annie Wang and Angela Yu

    • Society & Culture
    • 5.0 • 29 Ratings

As kids of immigrants from Taiwan, our Asian identity started with beef noodle soup and ended with Chinese school. Now that we’re adults, we’ve found that we still have a lot to learn about Taiwan’s history and its unique culture. Cousins Annie Wang and Angela Yu share their journey as they discover their family’s heritage and celebrate Taiwanese culture in the context of the Asian American experience.

    Overthinking and overachieving: our Season 1 retrospective

    Overthinking and overachieving: our Season 1 retrospective

    Was it crazy for two women in their 40s with kids, full-time jobs, and no media experience to start a podcast during the pandemic? From our first emails in January, we never would have guessed that by September we’d be wrapping our first season with 18 episodes and hundreds of listeners. In this episode, we look at the progress we’ve made on our journey so far, what we’ve learned about ourselves and each other, and the surprises we’ve encountered along the way. We reveal popular episodes and our favorites, then share what’s in store ahead.

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    • 37 min
    Raising the next generation

    Raising the next generation

    As English-speaking parents living outside our heritage country, we discuss how we go about passing our culture on to our kids. From seeking out Mandarin Immersion schools and caregivers, cultivating our kids' palates to appreciate Taiwanese food, and planning to visit Taiwan regularly for family vacations (when we can again!), we share what’s worked and what hasn’t across our kids ranging from age 4 to 12. Angela also shares the many new resources that have cropped up from entrepreneurs in the past 5 years to help parents like us.
    Links:
    NTNU Mandarin summer camp
    Mina Learns Chinese Instagram Reels featuring shows and movies on Netflix and Disney+ with Mandarin audio tracks
    Go! Go! Cory Carson on Netflix by Alex Woo and Stanley Moore of Kuku Studios
    Alok Menon on Instagram normalizing body hair and trans beauty
    La La Learn app for iPhone and iPad by Alice Han featuring children’s songs in Mandarin
    Hearts in Taiwan raising bilingual kids resources page lists all the books we mentioned and more (https://heartsintaiwan.com/raising-bilingual-kids)
    Connect (check for our giveaway here!):
    instagram.com/heartsintaiwan
    facebook.com/heartsintaiwan
    heartsintaiwan.com/voicemail

    • 49 min
    Mock debate: Taiwanese independence

    Mock debate: Taiwanese independence

    When we recorded our episode on politics in Taiwan, we practiced a mock debate to help us understand the viewpoints of the green and blue ends of the Taiwanese political spectrum. The issue in question: Should Taiwan formally declare independence from China in the next 12 months? Each of us was randomly assigned to represent one side in this bonus companion to the “50 shades of green (and blue)” episode.
    Credit:
    Cover photo of the infamous “pig guts brawl” in Taiwan’s legislative yuan by Gwydion M. Williams on Flickr with additional edits by Hearts in Taiwan.

    Connect:
    instagram.com/heartsintaiwan
    facebook.com/heartsintaiwan
    heartsintaiwan.com/voicemail

    • 21 min
    50 shades of green (and blue)

    50 shades of green (and blue)

    Annie and Angela tackle a taboo topic: politics in Taiwan! From dark green to light green and light blue to dark blue, we attempt to understand why each party believes what they do, and relate our observations to American pop culture. Plus, Angela asks for your recommendations for earth-friendly products that aren’t made in China.

    Further reading:
    Brawls in Taiwan’s Legislative Yuan (YouTube: pig guts in 2020, commonplace in 2017)Wild Lily student movement (OFTaiwan)1992 Consensus (Wikipedia)China interfering with Taiwan’s vaccine procurement (article)#FreeBritney Spears from conservatorship (freebritney.net)Sex and the City struggles of moving in together (clip)Green parties’ anti-nuclear platform (article)Insecure’s Thug Yoda character replacing “c” with “b” (clip, HBO homepage, Compton rapper YG explains on YouTube)Taiwan passport 2021 redesign (BBC)False comparison between US policy toward Afghanistan and Taiwan (New Bloom Magazine, Taiwan Insight)Taiwan Relations Act of 1979 (official text)Japan’s security tied to Taiwan (article)What Taiwanese Americans can learn from Taiwanese Politics (TaiwaneseAmerican.org)#notsponsored:
    Piico floss picks made in Taiwan (website, Instagram)
    Indigenous American-owned businesses (IG Guide, Website)
    Buy Nothing project for neighborhood sharing (buynothingproject.org)
    Credit:
    Cover photo by tomscy2000 on Flickr depicting a young protester during the Sunflower Movement

    Connect:
    instagram.com/heartsintaiwan
    facebook.com/heartsintaiwan
    heartsintaiwan.com/voicemail

    • 53 min
    Hearts (and ears) in Japan

    Hearts (and ears) in Japan

    Japan has some of the more notable cultural influences on Taiwan due to its 50 year occupation of Taiwan from 1895 to 1945. We explore some of the marks that Japan has left and its unique approach to colonization of Taiwan. Annie's mom returns for a guest appearance. 

    Sources
    The Empire of Japan (Wikipedia)
    Kano - 2014 movie about the baseball team
    Ear cleaning with mimikaki (JapanTravel)
    Ear cleaning in Chengdu, China (BBC)
    Ellie Yang Camp’s post on ear wax types (Instagram)
    Symbolism of plum blossom 梅花 in Taiwan (Wikipedia)
    The Twenty-One Demands from Japan to China in 1915 (Wikipedia)
    Nanjing Massacre (Wikipedia)
    Further reading
    https://www.latimes.com/world/asia/la-fg-taiwan-japan-20171106-story.html
    https://www.nytimes.com/2021/08/04/magazine/taiwan-china.html
    Taiwan as part of the Japanese empire (Encyclopedia Britannica)
    Longing for the Spring Breeze song history (Wikipedia)

    #NotSponsored
    EVA Air Hello Kitty flights
    EVA Air Hello Kitty flights to nowhere in August 2020 (CNN)
    EVA Air flight map draws thumbs-up sign (Scooper)

    Credits
    “望春風Longing for the Spring Breeze” was one of the first Taiwanese pop songs during the period of Japanese colonization.
    Longing for the Spring Breeze cover by 薛詒丹 Dan Hsueh and 翁光煒 Wico Weng
    Original recording of Longing for the Spring Breeze

    Connect
    instagram.com/heartsintaiwan
    facebook.com/heartsintaiwan
    heartsintaiwan.com

    • 39 min
    Taiwanese by the numbers

    Taiwanese by the numbers

    Just how big is the worldwide Taiwanese community anyway? We look at the numbers past and present that make up Taiwan and its diaspora, and discuss why it’s hard to track and measure the Taiwanese diaspora. The numbers surprise us and also leave us with some mysteries.


    Sources:
    UN world population prospects for Taiwan
    CIA World Factbook page on Taiwan
    Wikipedia page on Austronesian peoples
    Wikipedia page on Christianity in China
    Taipei vs New Taipei City Quora answer
    Wikipedia page on Overseas Taiwanese
    Taiwan’s OCAC report of 1M Taiwanese emigrants to the US (as of 2010)
    TACL summary of Census 2020 “Write in Taiwanese” campaign


    Credits:
    "Level Up" by Vienna Teng (Spotify)
    Cover photo: Liao Chen-huei, Taipei Times


    Connect:
    instagram.com/heartsintaiwan
    facebook.com/heartsintaiwan
    heartsintaiwan.com/voicemail

    • 43 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
29 Ratings

29 Ratings

trustella ,

Binged all the episodes in one day

As a kid of immigrants from Taiwan myself, the stories told by Angela and Annie resonate with my childhood and the adult relationship I have with parents today. And I’m loving “(not a) book club” which showcase awesome AAPI talent. Looking forward to many more episodes!

ampedlemon ,

A podcast made for me

If you are someone with a complex heritage, for example, from that of Taiwan or China, or any other culture then this podcast was made for you. Annie and Angela discuss the things that I’ve always wondered about my own family’s history and they do so in a engaging and thoughtful way. Can’t wait for the next episodes. Pew pew!

mmbluerz ,

A snippet into one of many amazing AAPI stories

Annie and Angela have an engaging podcast telling stories as they discover and uncover bits and pieces of their culture and heritage. I can’t wait for more episodes to come!

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