38 episodes

Hidden Histories sees Helen Carr exploring some of the country's hidden treasures, as she and some of our finest historians scramble through the actual spaces where history happened. Whether she's visiting the whorehouses of Covent Garden, or retracing the steps of the Peasants Revolt, Helen and her guests are a delightful guide to the hidden histories that lie just off the beaten track.

Hidden Histories History Hit Network

    • Society & Culture
    • 4.6 • 22 Ratings

Hidden Histories sees Helen Carr exploring some of the country's hidden treasures, as she and some of our finest historians scramble through the actual spaces where history happened. Whether she's visiting the whorehouses of Covent Garden, or retracing the steps of the Peasants Revolt, Helen and her guests are a delightful guide to the hidden histories that lie just off the beaten track.

    Michael Talbot on the Ottoman Empire and Piracy

    Michael Talbot on the Ottoman Empire and Piracy

    Michael Talbot talks about the Ottoman Empire. He starts with a broad overview of Ottoman interests and power, before moving on to a problem that would haunt the Ottomans consistently - pirates. These weren't necessarily pirates in a Disney sense - war between the British and the French consistently spilled over into the Meditterenean, and often Ottoman goods and shipping came under attack.


    Michael explores the Ottoman response, and how they sought to protect their shipping from pirates, corsairs and all sorts, with mixed results. Michael also approaches this story from the Ottoman perspective, a side of the story that we don't often get to hear.


    Read some of Michael's work here: https://www.historytoday.com/reviews/interpreting-ottoman-empire


    Find out more here: https://www.ukri.org/news/100-new-generation-thinkers/


    Producer: Peter Curry
     
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    • 24 min
    Christienna Fryar on the Emancipation of Jamaica

    Christienna Fryar on the Emancipation of Jamaica

    Christienna Fryar is a lecturer in Black British History at Goldsmiths, University of London. She talks to Helen about the emancipation of slaves in Jamaica in 1838. While the colonial government thought that a similar plantation system might exist with the addition of wages, their formerly enslaved subjects disagreed. Christienna talks about how Jamaicans resisted British rule, and particularly about the Morant Bay rebellion in 1865, which caused brutal British repression. The likes of Charles Dickens, Thomas Carlyle and J. S. Mill discussed whether the British response could be justified and came to very different conclusions.


    Christienna looks at how people in Jamaica resisted and challenged colonial structures and systems, and how in challenging them, they helped to reshape them. She talks about one particular case in the Kingston Lunatic Asylum that would change how the British approached asylums all over the empire, as well as much more.


    Find out more here: https://www.ukri.org/news/100-new-generation-thinkers/


    Producer: Peter Curry
     
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    • 32 min
    Edmund Richardson on Charles Masson and Discovering the Lost Cities of Alexander the Great

    Edmund Richardson on Charles Masson and Discovering the Lost Cities of Alexander the Great

    Charles Masson set out one day to hunt down the lost cities of Alexander the Great. He was an private in the East India Company's army until he deserted, and was as such trying to both locate and excavate a mysterious lost city, whilst also being on the run. His story is full of hardship, and Edmund Richardson discusses why a man would choose to abandon his station, journey into the middle of a previously unexplored region (at least by Westerners), and start hunting for the lost city of Alexandria under the Caucasus.


    Later, when the British invade Afghanistan and threaten his excavation, he is faced with a terrible choice: either join with the British and abandon his friends, or betray those who were close to him.


    Stories about Alexander the Great abound, and hearing these stories may have inspired Charles Masson's passion. One of the more famous accounts is the Alexander Romance, a long series of tales about his adventures, a lot of which are probably fictionalised - at one point Alexander takes a submarine to the bottom of the sea. As Edmund himself notes, the Romance has been "translated and adapted into everything from an Icelandic Alexanders Saga to an Ethiopian Romance - so it's travelled much further than even Alexander himself." Try this translation of the Greek version of the Romance by Richard Stoneman if you're interested: https://www.penguin.co.uk/books/351/35185/the-greek-alexander-romance/9780140445602.html


    Find out more here: https://www.ukri.org/news/100-new-generation-thinkers/


    Producer: Peter Curry
     
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    • 31 min
    Brendan McGeever on Anti-Semitism and the Russian Revolution

    Brendan McGeever on Anti-Semitism and the Russian Revolution

    Brendan McGeever talks to Helen about the relationship between anti-semitism and the Russian Revolution. The Russian Revolution in 1917 was a complex event, with myriad factions vying for power. In the chaos, a wave of anti-semitic attacks occurred, and many of the those vying for control did little to stop this. The Bolsheviks, lead by Vladimir Lenin, opposed anti-semitism but had to confront it within the movement and the wider working class. This produced a fascinating and at times contentious relationship between the Bolshevik leadership and Jewish socialists within the party.


    Brendan McGeever is a Lecturer in Sociology at Birkbeck, University of London.


    Find out more here: https://www.ukri.org/news/100-new-generation-thinkers/


    Producer: Peter Curry
     
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    • 19 min
    Catherine Fletcher on the Dark Side of the Italian Renaissance

    Catherine Fletcher on the Dark Side of the Italian Renaissance

    Catherine Fletcher is a Professor of History at Manchester Metropolitan University. Fletcher talks about the Italian Renaissance, giving a run-down of her new book, The Beauty and the Terror. She talks about Florence, and the beginnings of the renaissance, discussing Lorenzo de' Medici as well as the Borgias, as well as the influence of Girolamo Savanorola.


    She also talks about the more brutal aspects of the renaissance, from the potential that the Mona Lisa was funded by money earned from slavery, to the brutal retribution courtesans who transgressed the rules could face. The courtesan Angela Zafetta, model of Titian's Venus of Urbino, is reputed to have faced a punishment far worse than the usual for one such act of transgression. Fletcher also talks Machiavelli: what he said and what he didn't say, and why he matters.


    Find out more here: https://www.ukri.org/news/100-new-generation-thinkers/


    Producer: Peter Curry
     
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    • 31 min
    Tom Scott-Smith on the History of Famine Relief

    Tom Scott-Smith on the History of Famine Relief

    Tom Scott-Smith is Associate Professor of Refugee Studies and Forced Migration. He and Helen talk about the history of famine relief and humanitarian aid, and how it has changed over time. Humitarian aid is intensely political, and the form that humanitarian aid takes today is heavily influenced by its past. That form is important, because the type of aid that refugees receive has a big impact on their lives; the quality and quantity of food matters.


    Tom also talks nutritional science, showing how overproduction of milk, soy and corn in the 1930s, have been responsible for the nutritional content of humanitarian food today. He and Helen also discuss the liberation of Belsen, and whether there is any truth to the story that those being liberated from Bergen-Belsen were more interested in getting their hands on lipstick, rather than food.


    Find out more here: https://www.ukri.org/news/100-new-generation-thinkers/


    Producer: Peter Curry
     
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    • 37 min

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5
22 Ratings

22 Ratings

Lollipops2002 ,

I Love This Podcast!

This was an amazing podcast. I really enjoyed how Helen Carr set it up, and it was super interesting to hear about England’s history from some well known historians. The podcast’s pacing is a little bit slow, but it honestly works for the interview format that Carr has the podcast following. I can’t wait to listen to more if/when new episodes come out.

Russell gawat ,

Excellent historian

Helen is a top class historian . Covers some very interesting topics slightly more academic than many of the more populist historians. If I was to criticize at all it’s the huge gaps between episodes.

Ms. DeRosia ,

Sound quality improvements please

Wish she would improve her sound quality. Too echo-y

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