135 episodes

We answer the questions healthcare leaders are asking. High Stakes offers concise takes on the issues affecting healthcare providers today: strategic positioning, issue navigation, change management. mergers and acquisitions, marketing, digital transformation, patient experience, executive leadership and healthcare governance, and much more. At Jarrard Inc., we understand the stakes are high for healthcare executives. Every day, you are making bold decisions in a noisy, evolving industry. High Stakes puts you in the room with us and our more than 150 cumulative years of healthcare strategic communications experience so that you can not just survive but lead the transformation of our industry.

High Stakes Jarrard Phillips Cate & Hancock

    • News
    • 5.0 • 20 Ratings

We answer the questions healthcare leaders are asking. High Stakes offers concise takes on the issues affecting healthcare providers today: strategic positioning, issue navigation, change management. mergers and acquisitions, marketing, digital transformation, patient experience, executive leadership and healthcare governance, and much more. At Jarrard Inc., we understand the stakes are high for healthcare executives. Every day, you are making bold decisions in a noisy, evolving industry. High Stakes puts you in the room with us and our more than 150 cumulative years of healthcare strategic communications experience so that you can not just survive but lead the transformation of our industry.

    Trust, Finances and Storytelling in Healthcare Private Equity, with Dan Beuerlein and Ellis Metz

    Trust, Finances and Storytelling in Healthcare Private Equity, with Dan Beuerlein and Ellis Metz

    Dan Beuerlein is a managing director at Brentwood Capital, where he advises health services companies on M&A and capital raises. While his expertise extends across sectors, he has a particular focus on autism services, women's health and fertility, and outpatient surgery. Here, Beuerlein and Jarrard Vice President Ellis Metz talk about the state of the capital markets today, the work PE and other investors need to do to better tell the story of their work and value in healthcare, and their perspective on Jarrard's recent national consumer survey on private equity and post-acute care.
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    • 24 min
    Post-Acute Care and Private Equity: Consumer Survey Reaction Podcast, with Dan Schlacter

    Post-Acute Care and Private Equity: Consumer Survey Reaction Podcast, with Dan Schlacter

    This Sunday, we’re unveiling our new survey (the first of its kind at Jarrard), which sought the opinion of more than 1,000 adults across the country about their perception of post-acute models of care and private equity’s role in healthcare. Over the past decade, industry segments such as urgent care clinics and post-acute rehabilitation have evolved from emergent trends to mainstream components of care delivery. And in parallel, the involvement of private investors in healthcare has grown. With this survey, we aimed to understand consumers’ baseline views of these care delivery and business models, particularly in an era of eroding trust in healthcare institutions.
    In this week’s High Stakes podcast, we speak with Jarrard Vice President, Health Services Dan Schlacter about some of the survey’s headline takeaways. As one of the co-developers of the questionnaire, Schlacter sheds light on the implications of these insights.
    Key points:

    Broadly speaking, consumers’ perspectives on PE and “alternative” sites of care are not limited to leaders within those sectors. This survey is also relevant to hospital/acute care decision makers, particularly to understand which models or care people trust (and don’t trust) in the context of potential partnerships.

    That said, one significant takeaway is everybody has room to improve. In Schlacter’s words, “there’s not a whole lot of trust out there to begin with.” Remaining up to speed with the various levels of trust across the industry provides a valuable innovation and partnership playbook for leaders of every stripe. It can also help them retain, or gain, the coveted trust of key stakeholders when it counts the most.

    Speaking of “levels of trust”… government lawmakers and regulators are at the bottom of the barrel. At the same time, they have the power and jurisdiction to manifest change. Rather than doing so with an iron-fisted regulatory mindset, the public’s low view of these groups is an opportunity to adopt a partnership mindset between the government and private sector. Regulators can recognize that healthcare innovators, including investors, are driving positive change in the industry, and they can foster a supportive relationship to help accelerate new care models, ideas and partnerships that improve healthcare for everyone. 


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    • 20 min
    Conference Reaction Special: HPE Miami 2024

    Conference Reaction Special: HPE Miami 2024

    McDermott Will & Emery's annual two-day event convenes leaders and investors from across the industry to discuss emergent trends and topics impacting the healthcare investment world. This year, its timing couldn’t have been more appropriate. On Tuesday, just one day before the conference kicked off, the FTC, HHS and DOJ announced their shared investigation into private equity’s role in healthcare. This development, among others shaping the market – including the continued repercussions of large-scale cyber security incidents – made for lively conversation this year. Miami was buzzing.
    In the mix from our firm were Sheila Biggs, VP Health Services and Ellis Metz, VP Strategic Partnerships. We caught up with them as they were leaving town - Sheila recording from the hotel lobby, to get a few of their observations.
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    • 16 min
    Retail Healthcare: Are Referrals the Same as Access? With Abby McNeil and Sheila Biggs

    Retail Healthcare: Are Referrals the Same as Access? With Abby McNeil and Sheila Biggs

    Is retail healthcare the disruptor, the partner, the gap-filler or something else? What’s the best way for traditional health systems to interact with retail healthcare providers? There have been stories in the healthcare trades about these questions, so Abby McNeil and Sheila Biggs joined the High Stakes Podcast to sort them out. McNeil is a vice president and deputy lead of Jarrard’s Regional Health Systems Practice. Biggs is a vice president and deputy lead of our Health Services practice.
    Key Takeaways:

    Don’t conflate “learning from retail” or “competing with retail” with “partnering with retail.” Sounds obvious, but some of the coverage we’ve seen has done just that.

    Speaking of partnerships between acute providers and retail healthcare, it’s not clear whether those relationships will lead to their stated goal of increased access. They may lead to more referrals to the health system, but that’s different.

    That said, it does appear that the growing number of partnerships is built on an acknowledgement that each segment of the industry has a unique skillset, so rather than try to replicate someone else’s strengths, why not just work with them? But again, the jury is still out on whether that will lead to improved access or care for patients.

    When thinking about lessons learned from retail healthcare in the push for a more consumer-friendly system, it’s critical to look at root causes. For example, setting up an online scheduling platform does no good if there isn’t enough clinical staff to cover those appointments. Or if the physicians don’t want to use the systems and turn it off.

    Similarly, the expectations of clinicians have to be a big part of the conversation when thinking about how to develop a more consumer-friendly experience.

    Medical data – and the security of it – is an ongoing concern. Do patients want Amazon having all of their personal health information along with their consumer behaviors? Tread carefully.


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    • 19 min
    DEI in healthcare: When words get in the way, with James Cervantes and Allyson Carr

    DEI in healthcare: When words get in the way, with James Cervantes and Allyson Carr

    In this week’s High Stakes podcast, we explore the state of diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) initiatives in healthcare through a conversation with Jarrard Senior Vice President James Cervantes – who also serves as the leader of our Regional Health System Practice – and Senior Managing Advisor Allyson Carr. While DEI and health equity work has gained momentum throughout the industry as a workforce priority over the past four years, it is still often poorly understood, leading to underwhelming results when leaders try to codify their DEI priorities and bring initiatives to life. Thus, the cultural, operational and economic benefits of embedding DEI throughout an organization often go unrealized. Leaders need a framework for understanding DEI from 360 degrees and strategies for teaching and gaining buy-in from their stakeholders.

    Key Takeaways:

    The conversation around DEI was accelerated by the pandemic and George Floyd, which inspired a strong push for this work. But with both events shrinking in the rearview, what seemed like an inflection point in how we understand equity and belonging now is sometimes seen as a logistical box organizations need to check.

    In some states, policies legislate what terms can and cannot be used, which of course poses challenges to DEI initiatives. Even so, organizations can find ways to work around language restrictions and make real progress through how they engineer their organizational practices and customs.

    Success in DEI requires clear communication, storytelling and data-driven approaches to address gaps in care and achieve health equity.

    Partnerships with community organizations can help improve access to care and address social determinants of health. 


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    • 23 min
    Academic and National Health Systems: 2024 Healthcare Trends to Watch

    Academic and National Health Systems: 2024 Healthcare Trends to Watch

    At the end of 2023, we published our annual piece on healthcare trends primed to shape the new year. Leaders from each of Jarrard Inc.’s five practices shared insights on various challenges and opportunities facing the health systems and other provider organizations they serve. In this week’s High Stakes podcast, we’re releasing our full conversations with Tim Stewart, Jarrard partner and leader of our Academic Health Systems Practice, and Emily Shirden, vice president and leader of our National Health Systems Practice.
    Because of their scale and varied business functions, national and academic health systems often struggle with an inherent distance from their patients. The rift between the ivory tower and the bedside is wide and impersonal. As such, many leaders are engineering cutting-edge ways to personalize care and create a more patient-centered brand.
    Key Points


    Physician relationships: the secret key to system partnerships. Academic and national health systems alike are exploring innovative partnerships with smaller entities, such as community hospitals, to offer certain services, address a market gap or mitigate labor shortages. In scenarios like these, the larger system will be bringing on physicians who may be dubious of affiliating with the new brand. Preserving – or building – and strengthening these relationships are paramount to achieving the vision shared by organization and clinician alike.


    Personalization: everyone’s talking about it. Creating a more user-driven experience was a popular topic in several of our practice lead conversations. Amazon was mentioned several times. But activating this idea — building some sort of online shopping aisle for patients to browse their care services — is more complicated than tech development. Patient data safety is a conundrum that stands in the way of large health systems who would otherwise have the resources to explore such an offering.


    Smart offense: the art of advocating for yourself. In the face of widespread criticism, many providers are too slow to advocate for themselves. Rather than playing defense again and again to deflect every individual criticism, leaders should see these attacks as symptoms of a root cause: Trust is shaky. Healthcare leaders should address that issue by reinforcing their value proposition for every stakeholder — campaigning for themselves and the value they bring to their communities. 


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    • 23 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
20 Ratings

20 Ratings

AlexOlgin ,

Insightful takes on healthcare news

I appreciate the insightful takes by a variety of healthcare leaders. I especially enjoyed the episode with reactions about the demise of Haven. The guests talked about the media hype and the overly broad mandate - that could have come from a conversation over a nice bottle of wine.

courtwil9 ,

Timely & Engaging

Really insightful and important takes on healthcare today. Keep ‘em coming!

TS.23 ,

6 Stars!

There should be an extra star option for content this insightful.

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