8 episodes

This show is for your inner child of curiosity.
Think of it as a weekly deep dive into a wide variety of expert conversations with 100 people — designers, actors, infectious disease experts, recruiters, cannabis experts, chefs, musicians, humanitarian workers, architects, and others. Some are old friends, some are people we've just met, but all are human beings in the world.
Do you think there's a particular someone we should have on the show? If so, let us know. Either way, we'd love to hear from you.

How This Works Skipper Chong Warson

    • Personal Journals
    • 5.0 • 5 Ratings

This show is for your inner child of curiosity.
Think of it as a weekly deep dive into a wide variety of expert conversations with 100 people — designers, actors, infectious disease experts, recruiters, cannabis experts, chefs, musicians, humanitarian workers, architects, and others. Some are old friends, some are people we've just met, but all are human beings in the world.
Do you think there's a particular someone we should have on the show? If so, let us know. Either way, we'd love to hear from you.

    Nicolai Lipscomb

    Nicolai Lipscomb

    Starting under mentorship with James Beard winner Barbara Lynch, Nicolai Lipscomb has chefed at some of the best restuarants in the world, full stop — Arzak, El Celler Can Roca, at Fundacion Alicia with scientists and nutritionists under the direction of Ferran Adria and Pere Castells, the list goes on and on. And so this conversation with Skipper Chong Warson ranges the globe, starting in Half Moon Bay, Calif. to bungee jumping outside Vancouver Island, British Columbia to working in high pressure kitchens in Boston, Mass.; San Sebastián, Spain; Girona, Spain; and back to northern Calif. again among other locations.


    The topics range from talking about thrill seeking in motorcycle riding/bungee jumping, homemade Eggo waffles cooling on chopsticks, falling into and grinding through the ever challenging work of making and serving some of the most highly regarded food in the world while racing the clock and the swirling kitchen chaos, the requisite patience to not rush food, the secret to great paella, the importance of downtime in working as a chef, and the brain drain in running restuarants that's happening during COVID-19.


    One thing that we learned is that restaurants are the number one employer in Calif. And working backwards from the idea that the golden state has 1/8 of the United States population and by some estimates the various 2020 shutdown orders will end up closing 50% of restaurants that aren't backed by chains or corporations, that's a huge impact of which we weren't aware.


    While recording, Skipper mistakingly attributes Malcolm Gladwell's 10,000 hours of work equals mastery theory to "Blink" instead of "Outliers". (He corrected it with Nicolai offline as soon as he was able to look it up.) Stay tuned after the outro music for a bit of tape where Nicolai first mentions working on the line for the first time in six years.


    This episode was edited and mastered by Troy Lococo.
    Special Guest: Nicolai Lipscomb.
    Links:
    AdrenalineEggo wafflesBarbara LynchNo 9 ParkB&G OystersButcher ShopMalcolm Gladwell's "Outliers"Anne Sophie PicElena ArzakJuan Mari ArzakJoan RocaEl Celler de Can Roca2018 San Pelligrino list with Arzak and El Celler de Can RocaFundacion AliciaFerran AdriaPere CastellsRestaurant Industry at a glance in CaliforniaFerdinand's PaellaMustard Seed HospitalityNicolai Lipscomb on LinkedInNicolai on InstagramIntro and outro song: "Zombie Nation" by Jose Travieso

    • 50 min
    Selena Rosanbalm

    Selena Rosanbalm

    Having grown up with the idea that she wanted to perform and make music, Selena Rosanbalm talks with Skipper about being a musician and the work she’s done to write, record, release, and promote an independent album in 2020 with everything that's going on.


    The conversation has a wide swing, starting with her love of yacht rock (think Michael McDonald or Hall & Oates or the Doobie Bros), her fear of things underwater, her early thrill with performing "I Just Can't Wait to Be King" from The Lion King, the number system for calling the chords of the songs to everyone on-stage, how some musicians are still producing new cassette tapes, how being an independent musician is more work than it may seem (because not everyone's Bono), Black Sabbath's debut album done in one take (allegedly), how the name Rosie and the Ramblers came about, and how the cover art for Selena Rosanbalm started with a piece of photo equipment.


    Stay tuned after the outro music for a piece of tape where Skipper asks if Selena and the members of her backing band wear masks when performing. This episode was edited and mastered by Troy Lococo.
    Special Guest: Selena Rosanbalm.
    Links:
    What is Yacht Rock?Bobby CaldwellSubmechanophobiaThe Lion King - "I Just Can't Wait To Be King"Oklahoma City's City Walk Closed in 2014Nashville Number System Rosie and the Ramblers on BandcampSelenaFyre Festival: Inside the world's biggest festival flopDaniel CavazosFoo Fighters' "Everlong"Foo Fighters' "Monkey Wrench"According to Black Sabbath's guitarist and founder member Tony Iommi, the group's debut album was recorded in a single day on 16 October 1969Selena RosanbalmSelena Rosanbalm on BandcampIntro and outro song: "Zombie Nation" by Jose Travieso

    • 52 min
    Brad Bogus

    Brad Bogus

    As a marketing veteran, Brad breaks down the world of cannabis in this conversation with Skipper. There are stops along the way to talk about Shakespeare, punk rock, William Randolph Hurst, how the illegality of marijuana affects the prison/jail system in this country, the history of reefer madness, how President-elect Biden and speaker Pelosi are closer in age to the assasination of Lincoln than to the present day, H.R.3884 - MORE Act, and the tobacco industry among other subjects.


    Learn about happens to the human body when you smoke, eat, drink, or otherwise consume cannabis and CBD products. Also, what you should look out for when you're looking for quality CBD products. Brad also talks about his recent work with Tha Hood Squad, a nonprofit street organization, black and brown led, working to fight against overpolicing, racial profiling, and living with gentrification in east Palo Alto (northwestern corner of Santa Clara County, California) — which is right across the street from a significantly more afluent part of town.


    This episode contains some explicit language and adult subject matter. Stay tuned after the outro music to hear Skipper lay out with some expletives about one of the goals of How This Works, "F-word it, own the thing that you know!"


    This episode was edited and mastered by Troy Lococo.
    Special Guest: Brad Bogus.
    Links:
    Remembering Longtime Theatre Director Sidney BergerOn "The Winter's Tale""Titus" (1999) with Anthony Hopkins, Jessica Lange, and Osheen Jones among othersJulie Taymor, from WikipediaJulie Taymor's "A Midsummer Night's Dream" (2014)"Reefer Madness" by Eric SchlosserH.R.3884 - MORE Act of 2020The Agriculture Improvement Act of 2018What are Terpenes?Decarboxylating Cannabis: Turning THCA into THCCannabigerol (CBG)Tha Hood SquadTha Hood Squad on InstagramIntro and outro song: "Zombie Nation" by Jose Travieso

    • 58 min
    Jackie Velasquez-Ross

    Jackie Velasquez-Ross

    Recorded at the end of October 2020, Jackie and Skipper talked about some number of topics, including how being parents helped them both do better work, how Jackie thinks about recruiting as an art and a science, how fit is both important for the job seeker as well as for the company, how you should never settle for a job (unless you're a contractor), how all designers should have a portfolio, and how important it is to do your research before you apply for a job.


    Our show starts with a flub but we quickly recover. We talk about what it means when a designer uses off-the-shelf templates for their resume. Jackie's advice? Designers, design your resume. Also, send the right cover letter.


    Stay tuned after the outro music for a triumphant moment where technology didn't win. Which means we won. And that's always a good day. 😂
    Special Guest: Jackie Velasquez-Ross.
    Links:
    InVisionGoodby Silverstein20 Years of ‘Got Milk?’Level StudiosFacebook is merging Messenger with Instagram's direct messages - MashableClosed Mouths Don't Get FedThe future of work: By 2025, 36 million Americans will be remote workersJackie on LinkedInJackie on S01E01 of Outsights-In by KPN TechniumIntro and outro song: "Zombie Nation" by Jose Travieso

    • 50 min
    Dr. Peter Chin-Hong

    Dr. Peter Chin-Hong

    We talk with Dr. Peter Chin-Hong from University of California, San Francisco about his expertise as an infectious disease clinician on the novel coronavirus and COVID-19. We'll talk about the current state of the pandemic in California, around the country, and in the world at-large. We also get into what's happening with the vaccines (including the FDA approved Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine that uses mRNA to rewire a genetic trigger to the viral proteins) as well as other therapeutics, pandemic fatigue, and how holiday travel might work as other get togethers.


    But we didn't just talk about the biology or healthcare. We also talked about how Peter — or as his students call him, PCH, which are his initials as well as California's famous Pacific Coast Highway — got interested in medicine while he was growing up in Trinidad and Tobago. We also talked about racism is a public health concern and how Twitter provided not only community for him this year but also a way to learn from others in the larger medical community.


    Stay tuned until the end of the episode for a funny bit waxing about technology problems while recording.
    Special Guest: Dr. Peter Chin-Hong.
    Links:
    Wikipedia entry on Trinidad and TobagoA collection of the latest on Coronavirus (COVID-19) news from GoogleCOVID-19 vaccine distribution at UCSFCoronavirus vaccine trackerFDA approves Pfizer's coronavirus vaccine for distributionModerna COVID-19 vaccine awaits FDA approval. What is known about the drugmaker?Helen Chu from University of WashingtonThe U.S. Covid death toll tops 300,000 as vaccine distribution beginsGrocery shopping tips in COVID-19 from Dr. Jeffrey VanWingen — revised March 31, 2020COVID-19 deaths surpass 9/11 deaths in single dayIntro and outro song: "Zombie Nation" by Jose Travieso

    • 32 min
    Amy Kim Waschke

    Amy Kim Waschke

    We recorded this episode when the west coast fires were raging all up and down California, Oregon, and Washington state in Sep 2020. We talked about Amy's journey to becoming a stage actor as well as what her world looks like today as a company member for Oregon Shakespeare Festival (OSF) during COVID-19.


    One thing we talked about during this episode is how much the arts bring into the U.S. economy every year — on average, $877B is added to the economy, it employs 5.1M people, and is 4.5% of the GDP.


    Stay tuned until the end of the episode for a funny bit of tape about the "Scottish play".
    Special Guest: Amy Kim Waschke.
    Links:
    Robyn HuntThe Suzuki Method for actingThe Vampire Cowboys, a theatre company in New York, New YorkRobert Ross Parker"Vietgone" by Qui Nguyen — an NPR story from 2016 when Nguyen's play ran at Manhattan Theater Club"Poor Yella Rednecks" by Qui Nguyen — a story from the LA Times when Nguyen's play ran at South Coast RepMary Zimmerman's "The White Snake"Oregon Shakespeare FestivalOSF support of the Almeda fire rebuilding effortFrom Artnet 2018, an article about the number of dollars and jobs in the artsIra Glass' secret of success in creative work — from Maria Popova's Brain Pickings in 2014 — "Nobody tells people who are beginners — and I really wish somebody had told this to me — is that all of us who do creative work … we get into it because we have good taste. But it’s like there’s a gap, that for the first couple years that you’re making stuff, what you’re making isn’t so good, OK? It’s not that great. It’s really not that great. It’s trying to be good, it has ambition to be good, but it’s not quite that good. But your taste — the thing that got you into the game — your taste is still killer, and your taste is good enough that you can tell that what you’re making is kind of a disappointment to you..."Amy Kim Waschke's websiteIntro and outro song: "Zombie Nation" by Jose Travieso

    • 47 min

Customer Reviews

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5 Ratings

Philly girl 2 ,

When you just need "something different."

Tired of news, routines, and quarantine? Programs like "How This Works" are a great momentary escape because it's different every time, with topics you wouldn't have thought to look into but are very glad you did after each episode. Thanks Skipper!

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