23 episodes

St Edmund Hall’s inaugural Research Expo took place on 28 February 2015. It was a celebration of the great diversity of research currently being undertaken at the College, and was an opportunity for students and academics to interact, learn and engage with colleagues across all disciplines. The ‘Teddy Talks’, given by St Edmund Hall academics and postgraduate students, were a key part of the Expo. Aimed at a non-specialist audience and lasting around 12 minutes each, they give a quick introduction into a wide variety of research areas.

St Edmund Hall Research Expo 2015: Teddy Talks Oxford University

    • Education

St Edmund Hall’s inaugural Research Expo took place on 28 February 2015. It was a celebration of the great diversity of research currently being undertaken at the College, and was an opportunity for students and academics to interact, learn and engage with colleagues across all disciplines. The ‘Teddy Talks’, given by St Edmund Hall academics and postgraduate students, were a key part of the Expo. Aimed at a non-specialist audience and lasting around 12 minutes each, they give a quick introduction into a wide variety of research areas.

    Promoting nutrition through schools in a lower middle income country, Sri Lanka

    Promoting nutrition through schools in a lower middle income country, Sri Lanka

    Investigating how schools may help improve diet, particularly in low- and middle-income countries In recent decades, Sri Lanka has experienced a social, economic, demographic and environmental transition. Currently it suffers a double burden of under- and over-nutrition. It is important to align health promotion and development. This DPhil, which is part of a larger “Integrating Nutrition Promotion and Rural Development” project, investigates how schools may help improve diet, particularly in low- and middle-income countries. This presentation describes findings from qualitative research with school principals and staff (n=55) on perceived barriers to healthy diet choice amongst students. Participants identified barriers at all layers of a socio-ecological framework, supporting the use of multifactorial programmes to promote nutrition.

    • 12 min
    Past and Future Earthquake Hazard in Asia

    Past and Future Earthquake Hazard in Asia

    This lecture illustrates the ways in which the landscape in Central Asia has been influenced by active faults and earthquakes and will examine the hazard faced at the present-day. Mongolia, Kazakhstan, and Kyrgyzstan are lands of high mountains, faults, and earthquakes in the heart of Asia. The active deformation is due to the collision of India and Asia, which has generated faulting and mountain-building covering a region stretching from the Himalaya to Siberia, and is one of the main testing-grounds for theories of continental tectonics. A feature of many of the regions in which mountains are forming at the present-day - including central Asia - is that they are situated hundreds, or even thousands, of kilometres away from plate boundaries. As well as causing a widespread hazard to local populations, the very wide distribution of faulting within the continents show that they behave rather differently from oceanic plates, in which relative plate motions are accommodated within very narrow plate boundary zones. We still do not understand the rules that govern the distribution, in space and time, of major episodes of mountain building; but an essential first step in understanding these rules, which remains one of the fundamental goals in the study of continental tectonics, is to provide constraints on the distribution, rates, and evolution of deformation.

    • 15 min
    Rethinking the American Revolution and the US Founding Myth

    Rethinking the American Revolution and the US Founding Myth

    The importance of looking at the American colonial period not as the ‘Thirteen Colonies’ but as a British America consisting of twenty-six colonies and provinces. This discussion emphasises the importance of looking at the American colonial period not as the ‘Thirteen Colonies’ but as a British America consisting of twenty-six colonies and provinces. The US founding myth has persisted in part because it is such a big part of American culture and identity that no one questions it, and because it has been reinforced by a Canadian national narrative which emphasised loyalty to King and Empire to distinguish it from the US. Drawing parallels to contemporaneous demonstrations in Britain and the existence of Stamp Act riots in Nova Scotia and the West Indies I will argue that the Stamp Act riots should not necessarily be seen as the start of a revolution, and dispute the image of Loyalists as predominately wealthy merchants and government officials.

    • 8 min
    The stimulated brain

    The stimulated brain

    How non-invasive brain stimulation techniques might work, and how we have started to use them in stroke survivors. Non-invasive brain stimulation has been around for thousands of years - from the use of electric fish in Ancient Greece to cure headaches, to the modern use of very small electric currents passed through the brain via two electrodes placed on the scalp. Today, we use stimulation to modulate on-going brain activity, with the ultimate aim of improving hand use after stroke. Here I will discuss a little about how these techniques might work, and how we have started to use them in stroke survivors.

    • 12 min
    Can we predict the structure of matter?

    Can we predict the structure of matter?

    From predicting the properties of nanotechnological devices to the structural stability of small proteins and dynamics of water. Atomistic computer simulations of matter based on solving quantum mechanical equations is an interdisciplinary area that touches physics, chemistry, and a part of biology. By calculating the electronic structure of an arrangement of atoms, and at the same time predicting the forces acting on the individual nuclei (which are themselves quantum particles), it is possible to calculate a range of properties of known and unknown materials and molecules in a computer. I will illustrate some of the successes of these theories, from predicting the properties of nanotechnological devices to the structural stability of small proteins and dynamics of water.

    • 12 min
    Current practice in preventing and handling missing data alongside clinical trials: are we doing well?

    Current practice in preventing and handling missing data alongside clinical trials: are we doing well?

    Reviewing the methodology surrounding missing data in research and statistical analysis, clarifying why it can contribute to misleading results. Missing data is present in almost all research. However, it is also a well-recognised problem in the analysis and reporting of clinical research due to its potential to introduce bias into the results. Patient-reported outcomes measures, which are increasingly used in clinical research, can be particularly susceptible to missing data. This presentation will review the methodology surrounding missing data in research and statistical analysis, clarifying why it can contribute to misleading results. Guidance for the handling and reporting of missing data in clinical research will be presented, and compared to current practice, with a focus on randomised controlled trials.

    • 12 min

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