14 episodes

The Cambridge Centre for Law, Medicine and Life Sciences (LML), led by Dr Kathleen Liddell (Director) and Dr Jeffrey Skopek (Deputy Director), advances research and teaching on legal and ethical challenges at the forefront of medicine and the life sciences.

Rapid and prolific scientific advances, alongside changing attitudes towards health, medical care, family structures and related issues, pose some of the most difficult research questions of our era. These include questions about the adequacy of patents to incentivize medical innovation, the nature of informed consent, the allocation of liability for medical wrongs, the scope of privacy rights in electronic health records, the rationing of medical care, the regulation of emerging technologies and the implications of personalized medicine.

In addressing these and many other challenges, LML looks beyond the boundaries of medical law as traditionally conceived. Our members specialise not only in medical law and bioethics, but also in areas such as competition law, family law, human rights, public law, information law, international law and intellectual property. In addition, many have training in disciplines other than law (including medicine, economics, history and philosophy) and relevant professional experience (including legal practice, private consultancy and civil service).

This playlist contains lectures and other events held by the LML.

For more information see the LML website at http://www.lml.law.cam.ac.uk/

Centre for Law, Medicine and Life Sciences Lectures Cambridge University

    • News

The Cambridge Centre for Law, Medicine and Life Sciences (LML), led by Dr Kathleen Liddell (Director) and Dr Jeffrey Skopek (Deputy Director), advances research and teaching on legal and ethical challenges at the forefront of medicine and the life sciences.

Rapid and prolific scientific advances, alongside changing attitudes towards health, medical care, family structures and related issues, pose some of the most difficult research questions of our era. These include questions about the adequacy of patents to incentivize medical innovation, the nature of informed consent, the allocation of liability for medical wrongs, the scope of privacy rights in electronic health records, the rationing of medical care, the regulation of emerging technologies and the implications of personalized medicine.

In addressing these and many other challenges, LML looks beyond the boundaries of medical law as traditionally conceived. Our members specialise not only in medical law and bioethics, but also in areas such as competition law, family law, human rights, public law, information law, international law and intellectual property. In addition, many have training in disciplines other than law (including medicine, economics, history and philosophy) and relevant professional experience (including legal practice, private consultancy and civil service).

This playlist contains lectures and other events held by the LML.

For more information see the LML website at http://www.lml.law.cam.ac.uk/

    • video
    'Should parents have the final say on the medical treatment of their children?': The 2019 Baron de Lancey Lecture

    'Should parents have the final say on the medical treatment of their children?': The 2019 Baron de Lancey Lecture

    Baron Cornelius Ver Heyden de Lancey (1889-1984) was a wealthy and public-spirited Dutchman who at different times in his life was a dentist, doctor, surgeon, barrister and art historian. In 1970 he created the De Lancey and De La Hanty Foundation, to promote studies in medico-legal topics. The Foundation generously gave Cambridge the Ver Heyden de Lancey Fund, which since 1996 has funded occasional public lectures on medico-legal issues of current interest.

    The 2019 Baron de Lancey Lecture was delivered by Imogen Goold, Associate Professor in Law at the University of Oxford, on 8 March 2019, and was entitled "Should parents have the final say on the medical treatment of their children?".

    Imogen Goold is Associate Professor in Law at the University of Oxford, and a Fellow of St Anne's College. She studied Law and Modern History at the University of Tasmania, Australia, receiving her PhD in 2005. Her doctoral research explored the use of property law to regulate human body parts. She also received a Masters degree in Bioethics from the University of Monash in 2005. From 1999, she was a research member of the Centre for Law and Genetics, where she published on surrogacy laws, legal constraints on access to infertility treatments and proprietary rights in human tissue. In 2002, she took up as position as a Legal Officer at the Australian Law Reform Commission, working on the inquiries into Genetic Information Privacy and Gene Patenting. After leaving the ALRC in 2004, she worked briefly at the World Health Organisation, researching the provision of genetic medical services in developing countries. Her research interests include the regulation of IVF, the ownership of human body parts and the impact of artificial intelligence on the law of tort.

    For more information about the Baron de Lancey Lecture series, please see:

    http://www.lml.law.cam.ac.uk/events/vhdl-events

    • 53 min
    'Should parents have the final say on the medical treatment of their children?': The 2019 Baron de Lancey Lecture (audio)

    'Should parents have the final say on the medical treatment of their children?': The 2019 Baron de Lancey Lecture (audio)

    Baron Cornelius Ver Heyden de Lancey (1889-1984) was a wealthy and public-spirited Dutchman who at different times in his life was a dentist, doctor, surgeon, barrister and art historian. In 1970 he created the De Lancey and De La Hanty Foundation, to promote studies in medico-legal topics. The Foundation generously gave Cambridge the Ver Heyden de Lancey Fund, which since 1996 has funded occasional public lectures on medico-legal issues of current interest.

    The 2019 Baron de Lancey Lecture was delivered by Imogen Goold, Associate Professor in Law at the University of Oxford, on 8 March 2019, and was entitled "Should parents have the final say on the medical treatment of their children?".

    Imogen Goold is Associate Professor in Law at the University of Oxford, and a Fellow of St Anne's College. She studied Law and Modern History at the University of Tasmania, Australia, receiving her PhD in 2005. Her doctoral research explored the use of property law to regulate human body parts. She also received a Masters degree in Bioethics from the University of Monash in 2005. From 1999, she was a research member of the Centre for Law and Genetics, where she published on surrogacy laws, legal constraints on access to infertility treatments and proprietary rights in human tissue. In 2002, she took up as position as a Legal Officer at the Australian Law Reform Commission, working on the inquiries into Genetic Information Privacy and Gene Patenting. After leaving the ALRC in 2004, she worked briefly at the World Health Organisation, researching the provision of genetic medical services in developing countries. Her research interests include the regulation of IVF, the ownership of human body parts and the impact of artificial intelligence on the law of tort.

    For more information about the Baron de Lancey Lecture series, please see:

    http://www.lml.law.cam.ac.uk/events/vhdl-events

    This entry provides an audio source for iTunes.

    • 53 min
    • video
    'Parenthood Disrupted(?) Dilemmas of Reproductive Technologies': The Baron Ver Heyden de Lancey Lecture 2018

    'Parenthood Disrupted(?) Dilemmas of Reproductive Technologies': The Baron Ver Heyden de Lancey Lecture 2018

    Baron Cornelius Ver Heyden de Lancey (1889-1984) was a wealthy and public-spirited Dutchman who at different times in his life was a dentist, doctor, surgeon, barrister and art historian. In 1970 he created the De Lancey and De La Hanty Foundation, to promote studies in medico-legal topics. The Foundation generously gave Cambridge the Ver Heyden de Lancey Fund, which since 1996 has funded occasional public lectures on medico-legal issues of current interest.

    The 2018 Baron Ver Heyden de Lancey Lecture on Medico-Legal Studies was delivered by Professor Glenn Cohen is a Professor of Law at Harvard University, on 9 March 2018, and was entitled "Parenthood Disrupted(?) Dilemmas of Reproductive Technologies".

    Glenn Cohen is a Professor of Law at Harvard University, and one of the world's leading experts on the intersection of bioethics and the law. His award-winning research has appeared in the top legal, ethical and medical journals, and he is regularly cited in national news media. He has authored and edited several books, including Patients with Passports, Specimen Science, and Identified versus Statistical Lives. Prior to receiving tenure at Harvard, he served as a law clerk on a U.S. federal Court of Appeals and as an appellate lawyer for the U.S. Department of Justice. In his spare time, he still litigates, most recently having authored amicus briefs for U.S. Supreme Court cases on the patentability of human genes and abortion rights.

    A gallery of photographs from the event is available at https://1drv.ms/f/s!Au0Tn35SqSa2gYkI0p2cjZU0Jvv9mQ

    This event is kindly sponsored by the Ver Heyden de Lancey Fund, and organised by the Centre for Law, Medicine and Life Sciences, in collaboration with Cambridge Family Law.

    For more information about the Baron Ver Heyden de Lancey Lecture series, please see http://www.lml.law.cam.ac.uk/events/vhdl-events

    • 55 min
    'Parenthood Disrupted(?) Dilemmas of Reproductive Technologies': The Baron Ver Heyden de Lancey Lecture 2018 (audio)

    'Parenthood Disrupted(?) Dilemmas of Reproductive Technologies': The Baron Ver Heyden de Lancey Lecture 2018 (audio)

    Baron Cornelius Ver Heyden de Lancey (1889-1984) was a wealthy and public-spirited Dutchman who at different times in his life was a dentist, doctor, surgeon, barrister and art historian. In 1970 he created the De Lancey and De La Hanty Foundation, to promote studies in medico-legal topics. The Foundation generously gave Cambridge the Ver Heyden de Lancey Fund, which since 1996 has funded occasional public lectures on medico-legal issues of current interest.

    The 2018 Baron Ver Heyden de Lancey Lecture on Medico-Legal Studies was delivered by Professor Glenn Cohen is a Professor of Law at Harvard University, on 9 March 2018, and was entitled "Parenthood Disrupted(?) Dilemmas of Reproductive Technologies".

    Glenn Cohen is a Professor of Law at Harvard University, and one of the world's leading experts on the intersection of bioethics and the law. His award-winning research has appeared in the top legal, ethical and medical journals, and he is regularly cited in national news media. He has authored and edited several books, including Patients with Passports, Specimen Science, and Identified versus Statistical Lives. Prior to receiving tenure at Harvard, he served as a law clerk on a U.S. federal Court of Appeals and as an appellate lawyer for the U.S. Department of Justice. In his spare time, he still litigates, most recently having authored amicus briefs for U.S. Supreme Court cases on the patentability of human genes and abortion rights.

    A gallery of photographs from the event is available at https://1drv.ms/f/s!Au0Tn35SqSa2gYkI0p2cjZU0Jvv9mQ

    This event is kindly sponsored by the Ver Heyden de Lancey Fund, and organised by the Centre for Law, Medicine and Life Sciences, in collaboration with Cambridge Family Law.

    For more information about the Baron Ver Heyden de Lancey Lecture series, please see http://www.lml.law.cam.ac.uk/events/vhdl-events

    This entry provides an audio source for iTunes U.

    • 57 min
    • video
    'Montgomery: a dramatic change in the law on patient consent?': The Baron de Lancey Medical Law Lecture 2016

    'Montgomery: a dramatic change in the law on patient consent?': The Baron de Lancey Medical Law Lecture 2016

    Baron Cornelius Ver Heyden de Lancey (1889-1984) was a wealthy and public-spirited Dutchman who at different times in his life was a dentist, doctor, surgeon, barrister and art historian. In 1970 he created the De Lancey and De La Hanty Foundation, to promote studies in medico-legal topics. The Foundation generously gave Cambridge the Ver Heyden de Lancey Fund, which since 1996 has funded occasional public lectures on medico-legal issues of current interest.

    The The Baron de Lancey Medical Law Lecture 2016 was delivered on 5 February 2016 by Mr James Badenoch QC who acted as counsel for the successful appellant before the UK Supreme Court in Montgomery v Lanarkshire Health Board [2015] UKSC 11, and was entitled "Montgomery: a dramatic change in the law on patient consent?".

    In his lecture James Badenoch outlined the state of the law before the decision in Montgomery and the numerous ways in which it had failed to pay attention to the key distinction, recognised by the Supreme Court in Montgomery, between cases concerning disclosure of information and those concerning the application of medical skill and expertise. He went on to suggest that the decisive break achieved in Montgomery may well prove an apt footing on which to challenge the long-held authority of the so-called 'Bolam' test for whether a medical practitioner has been negligent in situations outside of that considered in Montgomery.

    For more information about the Baron de Lancey Medical Law Lecture series, please see http://www.lml.law.cam.ac.uk/events/vhdl-events

    • 1 hr 13 min
    'Montgomery: a dramatic change in the law on patient consent?': The Baron de Lancey Medical Law Lecture 2016 (audio)

    'Montgomery: a dramatic change in the law on patient consent?': The Baron de Lancey Medical Law Lecture 2016 (audio)

    Baron Cornelius Ver Heyden de Lancey (1889-1984) was a wealthy and public-spirited Dutchman who at different times in his life was a dentist, doctor, surgeon, barrister and art historian. In 1970 he created the De Lancey and De La Hanty Foundation, to promote studies in medico-legal topics. The Foundation generously gave Cambridge the Ver Heyden de Lancey Fund, which since 1996 has funded occasional public lectures on medico-legal issues of current interest.

    The The Baron de Lancey Medical Law Lecture 2016 was delivered on 5 February 2016 by Mr James Badenoch QC who acted as counsel for the successful appellant before the UK Supreme Court in Montgomery v Lanarkshire Health Board [2015] UKSC 11, and was entitled "Montgomery: a dramatic change in the law on patient consent?".

    In his lecture James Badenoch outlined the state of the law before the decision in Montgomery and the numerous ways in which it had failed to pay attention to the key distinction, recognised by the Supreme Court in Montgomery, between cases concerning disclosure of information and those concerning the application of medical skill and expertise. He went on to suggest that the decisive break achieved in Montgomery may well prove an apt footing on which to challenge the long-held authority of the so-called 'Bolam' test for whether a medical practitioner has been negligent in situations outside of that considered in Montgomery.

    For more information about the Baron de Lancey Medical Law Lecture series, please see http://www.lml.law.cam.ac.uk/events/vhdl-events

    This entry provides an audio source for iTunes U.

    • 1 hr 13 min

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