50 episodes

What will the future look like? The Future of Everything offers a kaleidoscope view of the nascent trends that will shape our world. In every episode, join our award-winning team on a new journey of discovery. We’ll take you beyond what’s already out there, and make you smarter about the scientific and technological breakthroughs on the horizon that could transform our lives for the better.

WSJ’s The Future of Everything The Wall Street Journal

    • Technology
    • 4.3 • 1.3K Ratings

What will the future look like? The Future of Everything offers a kaleidoscope view of the nascent trends that will shape our world. In every episode, join our award-winning team on a new journey of discovery. We’ll take you beyond what’s already out there, and make you smarter about the scientific and technological breakthroughs on the horizon that could transform our lives for the better.

    How Football Tech May Change the Game for Head Injuries

    How Football Tech May Change the Game for Head Injuries

    When the game clock starts, football players aren’t just heading out with their pads and a game plan. Technology like helmet sensors that track the hits players take are becoming more common, especially for young players. They’re being used to figure out when a player might be at risk for a concussion or another brain injury. The data collected is helping researchers and doctors learn more about what happens to the brain over time. But could these innovations and research shape how we play football?



    Further reading: 

    Tua Tagovailoa Is in the NFL’s Concussion Protocols Again - WSJ 

    Severity, Not Frequency, Sets Football Injuries Apart - WSJ 

    NFL and Nike Court a New Football Market: Girls - WSJ 

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    • 28 min
    Algorithms Are Everywhere. How You Can Take Back Control

    Algorithms Are Everywhere. How You Can Take Back Control

    Computer algorithms and artificial intelligence increasingly affect more and more of our lives, from the content we’re shown online, to the music we enjoy, to how our household appliances work. But the results these algorithms produce may be changing our world in ways users may not fully understand. WSJ’s Danny Lewis speaks with psychologist Gerd Gigerenzer, director of the Harding Center for Risk Literacy at the University of Potsdam. He’s spent decades studying how people make choices and find patterns when faced with uncertainty, and has some ideas about how to navigate and improve the relationship between AI and our society.



    Further reading:



    The Backstory of ChatGPT Creator OpenAI 

    New York City Delays Enforcement of AI Bias Law 

    How AI That Powers Chatbots and Search Queries Could Discover New Drugs 

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    • 21 min
    From Laundry to the Ocean: Fixing the Microplastics Problem in Clothes

    From Laundry to the Ocean: Fixing the Microplastics Problem in Clothes

    Our clothes are in need of a refresh, but not in the way you might think. With each wash, everything from sweaters to socks are releasing tiny, microscopic fibers into our water. Almost 35% of the primary microplastics in oceans right now come from laundry, according to the International Union for Conservation of Nature. 



    From filters in our washing machines to new materials for our clothes, alternatives are in the works to stop microplastics from coming off our clothes. But will it be enough? WSJ’s Alex Ossola and Ariana Aspuru speak about the steps researchers and companies are taking to solve the problem of microplastics in our wash.



    Further reading: 

    The Tiny Plastics in Your Clothes Are Becoming a Big Problem - WSJ  

    Ocean Garbage Patches Have a Microscopic Problem - WSJ 

    Fashion Firms Look to Single-Fiber Clothes as EU Recycling Regulations Loom - WSJ 

    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    • 25 min
    Navigating The Future of Maps

    Navigating The Future of Maps

    From paper maps to smartphone apps, the way people navigate the world has changed tremendously due to the rise of the internet. Google Maps is the fourth most popular mobile app in the U.S. by unique visitors, according to Comscore. That makes it more popular than Instagram, Tiktok and Spotify or its closest competitor, Apple Maps. Christopher Phillips, who runs Google’s Geo team and oversees Google Maps, speaks with WSJ’s Danny Lewis about how his company is thinking about the role maps play in bringing more information to our fingertips.



    Further reading:

    WSJ: The Future of Transportation 

    Google Combines Maps and Waze Teams Amid Pressure to Cut Costs 

    Google Reaches $391.5 Million Settlement With States Over Location Tracking Practices 

    Slow Self-Driving Car Progress Tests Investors’ Patience 



    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    • 20 min
    Making It Rain: How Cloud Seeding Could Help Combat Future Droughts

    Making It Rain: How Cloud Seeding Could Help Combat Future Droughts

    This past summer, many parts of the world suffered from some of the worst drought conditions in decades. In an effort to create more rain, the government of China turned once again to cloud seeding, a controversial technique that aims to target precipitation in key areas. WSJ’s Alex Ossola talks to Dr. Katja Friedrich, an atmospheric scientist at the University of Colorado Boulder, about the advantages and disadvantages of using cloud seeding to get more water where it is needed. 



    Further reading: 

    China Extends Power Curbs Amid Heat Wave, Drought 

    China, Thirsty and Craving Rain, Lines Clouds With Silver Bullets 

    When the U.S. Tried to Control Hurricanes 

    Indonesian Snapshot: The Rainmakers of Riau 

    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    • 22 min
    Thanksgiving of the Future: What Climate Change Means for Your Plate

    Thanksgiving of the Future: What Climate Change Means for Your Plate

    Thanksgiving often centers around a meal: turkey, sides and a lot of desserts. This year, many Thanksgiving staples are more expensive due to inflation; in the future, many of those staples will cost even more due to the effects of climate change. WSJ’s Alex Ossola looks into how environmental conditions, alongside technological advances, will change what makes its way to our Thanksgiving tables, and how our individual choices may spark new traditions. 



    Further reading: 

    The Trouble With Butter: Tight Dairy Supplies Send Prices Surging Ahead of Baking Season 

    Record Turkey Prices Are Coming for Thanksgiving 

    Lab-Grown Poultry Clears First Hurdle at FDA 

    Sean Sherman’s 2018 op-ed in Time 

    The Essential Thanksgiving Playbook 

    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    • 21 min

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5
1.3K Ratings

1.3K Ratings

groovecanon ,

Great Podcast

Wonderfully produced. Great topics. High fiving a million angels 🙌

TeqTiger ,

Great topic, bad interview

Cloud seeding is an excellent topic for informative discussion. Unfortunately, this guest was entirely underwhelming and the interviewer didn’t really improve the effort. I typically love this podcast but this one left me high and dry. Better luck next time!

littlest cowboy ,

This pod used to be good

Your guest on bio whatever didn’t even know how to explain what she’s doing. Bunch of gobblety goop

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