30 episodes

Every episode focuses on a different famous mythological figure. Through atmospheric story-telling we learn the condensed origins of folklore tales from all over the world, and also take a look at varying interpretations, cultural differences, and how the stories have influenced other media. Hosted by Bob Shoy. Contact at fiveminutefolklore@gmail.com

Five Minute Folklore Bob Shoy

    • Society & Culture
    • 4.8, 34 Ratings

Every episode focuses on a different famous mythological figure. Through atmospheric story-telling we learn the condensed origins of folklore tales from all over the world, and also take a look at varying interpretations, cultural differences, and how the stories have influenced other media. Hosted by Bob Shoy. Contact at fiveminutefolklore@gmail.com

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
34 Ratings

34 Ratings

queenlondonhome ,

This guy is gonna be big one day!

I love the laid back angle he takes. Very creative on his sound effects. Tells a story beautifully and follows up with details that we learn as we go through the podcast. I love folktales and he is brilliant and it shows through his work. ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ he’s gonna go far-he’s only just begun!! And by the way-British podcasts rock!

midwest_rav ,

Very enjoyable tales

Brings a good amount of information to easy to digest podcast time format. Have found myself reading up on several of the stories presented.

buggirl1 ,

Eurocentric and cheesy, no thanks

I tried listening to the Llorona episode, but stopped half way through. I could get past the cheesy Spanish language quotes that seemed comedic in contrast to the narrator’s straight forward and plain speech. If you’re going to be funny then do it throughout, but don’t do it in the story telling and then shift to you plain speech because it confuses the listener. Do I laugh? was it supposed to be funny? I could not get past the mispronunciation of La Llorona’s famous wail, “aaay mis hijos,” nor the lack of consideration for social context and the suggestion that the Llorona narrative might be influenced by Greek mythology. First, this is a legend with the power to reference something about the teller and the place in which s/he or they live as well as the person re-telling the narrative. To the author: Why did you choose the narratives you did? Deal with that somehow and own your male bias. Second, why do you think La Llorona is influenced by Greek mythology? What evidence do you have to suggest that? None. Your work is assuming that Western mythology is the center. Key word here is: assuming! I don’t deny that there are similarities between Lamia witch and La Llorona, but they have very different connections to historical, geographic and social experiences and it is offensive to Mexicans and Latinx to suggest that the origins of our myths are European when we have our own roots and origins. Your suggestion undermines the creativity of the people whose stories you shared.

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