117 episodes

Every week Chris Hayes asks the big questions that keep him up at night. How do we make sense of this unprecedented moment in world history? Why is this (all) happening?



This podcast starts to answer these questions. Writers, experts, and thinkers who are also trying to get to the bottom of them join Chris to break it all down and help him get a better night’s rest. “Why is this Happening?” is presented by MSNBC and NBCNews Think.

Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes NBC News

    • Politics
    • 4.7, 6.2K Ratings

Every week Chris Hayes asks the big questions that keep him up at night. How do we make sense of this unprecedented moment in world history? Why is this (all) happening?



This podcast starts to answer these questions. Writers, experts, and thinkers who are also trying to get to the bottom of them join Chris to break it all down and help him get a better night’s rest. “Why is this Happening?” is presented by MSNBC and NBCNews Think.

    Being Michael Jordan with David Roth and Joel Anderson

    Being Michael Jordan with David Roth and Joel Anderson

    What is the toll of becoming one of the most recognizable figures in the world? What are the downfalls of that level of fame? This week, we thought we'd try something a little different and discuss one of the most popular pieces of pop culture to come out in the era of physical distancing: ESPN's docuseries on Michael Jordan. "The Last Dance" paints a compelling portrait of the corrosive nature of fame and what's left when you get everything you want. Joel Anderson's article in Slate titled "Michael Jordan Is Exactly Who I Thought He Was" and David Roth's work recapping the series for Vulture both caught Chris' eye, so he brought them on to discuss the life and legacy of #23.




    RELATED LINKS:

    Follow David Roth on Twitter

    Follow Joel Anderson on Twitter

    Listen to Joel Anderson host Season 3 of Slow Burn: Biggie and Tupac

    • 46 min
    Home From School with Dana Goldstein

    Home From School with Dana Goldstein

    What does education look like in the age of the coronavirus? What will it take for schools to reopen? The education system is in uncharted territory, with students isolated from their peers and guardians tasked with navigating the technological demands required by remote learning. Like everything else in this moment, there are more questions than answers about what comes next. Education reporter Dana Goldstein joins to discuss what she’s hearing from students, how other countries are adapting, and what long-term implications this disruption could have.

    Plus, Goldstein shares her personal story of becoming one of the first pregnant women in the country to be diagnosed with COVID. She describes the scariest moments in her battle with the disease, quarantined in her New York apartment with her husband and young daughter.

    RELATED READING:

    Read more of Dana' Goldstein's reporting here

    The Teacher Wars by Dana Goldstein

    • 58 min
    The Pandemic Behind Bars with Josie Duffy Rice

    The Pandemic Behind Bars with Josie Duffy Rice

    How is the pandemic playing out in jails and prisons? Insufficient health care, a lack of protective gear, and the fundamental inability to physically distance have created inescapable outbreaks. Those incarcerated are at the center of some of the top coronavirus hot spots in the country. And as lawyer and president of The Appeal Josie Duffy Rice points out, these systems are porous; an outbreak in a jail could mean an outbreak in the community. So what can and should be done for the incarcerated populations? And what broader inequities are we seeing with the criminal justice system in the midst of this pandemic?  Listen to Josie Duffy Rice to find out.

    • 53 min
    Saving the Economy with Saule Omarova

    Saving the Economy with Saule Omarova

    Are we doing enough to keep the economy alive through this crisis? So far, economic relief efforts have been messy, convoluted, and inequitably distributed. But while we talk about the steps taken to save the economy, we first need to know the structures in which that recovery originates. Who decides where the money goes, how are those decisions being made – and can these mechanisms be more effective? Not just in this current pandemic-induced economic contraction, but on a more permanent institutional level. How can we ensure our financial system is stable enough to weather these types of crises? After dedicating her academic career to answering these types of questions, law professor Saule Omarova joins to discuss her proposal for what that new type of institution can and should look like.




    RELATED READING

    Unsanitized: Why We Need a National Investment Authority by Saule Omarova

    • 57 min
    The Cost of Division with Heather McGhee

    The Cost of Division with Heather McGhee

    Why are African Americans getting hit the hardest by the coronavirus? In part, this public health crisis is shining a light on the ramifications of policies and politics rooted in the legacy of racism. And what’s interesting, and what Heather McGhee is writing about for her upcoming book, is the way these racially motivated politics end up creating bad economic policy overall, producing a government that makes everyone worse off. So while we watch scenes of people lining up for miles to get groceries from food banks and hear about unemployed Americans struggling within a broken system to receive some kind of financial relief, Heather McGhee joins to discuss the true cost of a racially divided nation.




    RELATED LINKS

    The Sum of Us by Heather McGhee (available for Pre-order)

    Watch Heather McGhee's TED talk "Racism has a cost for everyone"

    Listen to Heather McGhee's call with Gary from North Carolina

    Hear the volcano suggestion Chris Hayes received on air




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    White Identity Politics with Michael Tesler

    Dying of Whiteness with Jonathan Metzl

    • 59 min
    Solidarity in a Disaster with Rebecca Solnit

    Solidarity in a Disaster with Rebecca Solnit

    Something remarkable is happening. While we must be physically isolated, separated from the world and those we love, people are finding creative ways to reach out and foster community. From sewing masks for strangers to singing with your neighbors to organizing virtual family meals, acts of generosity and grace are breaking through what can feel like an insurmountable darkness. Author Rebecca Solnit spent time studying the aftermath of tragedies like September 11th and Hurricane Katrina for her book, "A Paradise Built in Hell". She found that people often responded to these monumental moments of collective trauma with solidarity, courage, and a drive to make change for the better. 




    RELATED READING:

    A Paradise Built in Hell by Rebecca Solnit

    Recollections of My Nonexistence by Rebecca Solnit

    'The impossible has already happened': what coronavirus can teach us about hope by Rebecca Solnit (The Guardian, Apr 7 2020)

    • 52 min

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5
6.2K Ratings

6.2K Ratings

scared senior ,

Language

Have enjoyed the podcasts except for foul language from Chris. English is a rich language so hopefully other words could be used. Thanks,
Dr. GC

Haven’t listened for awhile. Great guests but Chris still constantly interrupts.
Dr. GC

nyc4you ,

Necessary Swearing included

As a fellow New Yorker Chris provides just the right amount of swearing. The quality interviews are a bonus. Nuff said.

Demeter62 ,

Another Trump Bashing Podcast

To add to the effort to turn this into a one-party country. Media propaganda or should I say soon government propaganda of a sieged country in the grips of repressing socialism. I came to realize that Republicans are the most liberal of all parties. Likewise, the press / media has turned into the voice and instrument of a repressive intolerant Democratic Party...

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