8 episodes

FOR LIFE: The Podcast is a 6-part series exploring real stories from men and women who were wrongfully convicted, yet prevailed against unthinkable odds, and emerged with grace and newfound purpose. It's about the human stories, the tested relationships, and the triumphs of the human spirit. Hosted by Isaac Wright, Jr.

Produced in collaboration with Sony Pictures Television and ABC's new drama, FOR LIFE, airing Tuesdays at 10pm/9pm Central.

FOR LIFE: The Podcast Sony Pictures Television & ABC

    • Society & Culture
    • 4.9 • 247 Ratings

FOR LIFE: The Podcast is a 6-part series exploring real stories from men and women who were wrongfully convicted, yet prevailed against unthinkable odds, and emerged with grace and newfound purpose. It's about the human stories, the tested relationships, and the triumphs of the human spirit. Hosted by Isaac Wright, Jr.

Produced in collaboration with Sony Pictures Television and ABC's new drama, FOR LIFE, airing Tuesdays at 10pm/9pm Central.

    Introducing FOR LIFE: The Podcast

    Introducing FOR LIFE: The Podcast

    A preview of FOR LIFE: The Podcast, premiering February 11th

    • 1 min
    Jeffrey Deskovic

    Jeffrey Deskovic

    Jeffrey Deskovic was just a teenager when he was wrongfully convicted in 1990. Through 16 years of incarceration — and despite countless painful setbacks — he remained determined to prove his innocence. In this episode, Jeffrey tells his story of resilience, and the tenacity he never knew he had until his freedom depended on it.

    • 37 min
    Richard Miles

    Richard Miles

    Late one night in 1994, 19-year-old Richard Miles called his roommate from a payphone on his way home. He was at the wrong place at the wrong time. A nearby shooting, a case of mistaken identification, and brazen prosecutorial misconduct would put him behind bars for 15 years. Richard shares how faith and family helped him survive -- and how one lucky break led to his exoneration.  

    • 40 min
    Gloria Killian

    Gloria Killian

    Gloria Killian was a former law student with no criminal record when she was implicated in a 1981 murder and robbery. She was sentenced to 32 years to life in prison. In this chapter, Gloria shares how the community she found in prison and her work helping her fellow inmates, along with her unlikely friendship with a social justice advocate, would change the course of her life.

    • 36 min
    Coming up on FOR LIFE: The Podcast

    Coming up on FOR LIFE: The Podcast

    A preview of the upcoming episodes when we resume on March 10th

    • 1 min
    Kwame Ajamu

    Kwame Ajamu

    Kwame Ajamu was 17 years old when he, his brother, and their friend were convicted of robbery and murder in 1975. The only evidence against them was the fabricated testimony of a 12-year-old boy. Still, all three men were sentenced to death. In this chapter, Kwame describes how education became his refuge during his 28 years in prison, and how his personal transformation would turn him into the man who would exonerate the three, and eventually find the love and support he needed.

    • 43 min

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
247 Ratings

247 Ratings

kayferguson13 ,

Very powerful

I’m disgusted by judges who apologize to a person once they’ve been proven innocent after they’ve aided & abetted to help destroy the person’s life. It’s easy for people to overlook that judges are lawyers first & foremost, but in the role of judge they act as though they don’t know the law & ignore significant errors made by prosecutors & lack of appropriate action of defense attorneys. Prosecutors run the courtroom. IDK what kind of incentives prosecutors receive when they knowingly doggedly seek convictions against people with flimsiest of evidence, charges they wouldn’t dream of giving to a white person. More Black & Hispanic people, seen as throwaways are in prison bc any evidence will do. They just don’t value all life, the injustice put upon these persons is like a natural phenomenon. The big lie that black people don’t feel pain gives license to disregard. The incarceration of white people is small in comparison bc they usually aren’t arrested on the same type of flimsy charges or even strong charges; they always justify why even strong evidence doesn’t result in an arrest & charges. Prosecutors don’t think twice about charging Black & Hispanics bc they’re easy victims & convictions are guaranteed. As for juries, I think they have the mindset straight away that the person wouldn’t be charged if the defendant didn’t do it, innocent people don’t confess & that cops always tell the truth. Together, with the generations-long drum beat of negative & evil portrayals of Blacks & Hispanics that white people are inherently good & everyone else is inherently bad. America doesn’t have a legal system, it still has gallows in plain view. America makes no secret who the proverbial gallows are for. The song at the end made me cry 😭. Why can’t the justice hear their pain?

foooooooodsjjsjebxjbsvzhbs ,

Inspiring

All the stories highlight the different pitfalls in our justice system. It has helped enlighten me a well as inspire me as a new social worker and a human being. I thank each of you for sharing your story.

imhimheisi ,

I applaud each and every one of you folks ,🥺🥺

I did time for a drug sale they claim I did well two of them they didn’t find me with no drug money or drugs or anything that would suggest I was a drug dealer even the area I was not familiar with at the time only a place I frequent for hot wings with friends , Had to do school zone mandatory and basically gave up because whatever they said my family went along with . Lost my daughter in child services durning and because these two charges. God bless all of you thank you for your stories I kno if I’m future I know I have to never give up like I did last time thank you 🙏🏾

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