13 episodes

The FADER Interview is a new podcast series in which the world’s most exciting musicians talk with the staff of The FADER about their latest projects. We’ll hear from emerging pop artists on the verge of mainstream breakthroughs, underground rappers pushing boundaries, and icons from across the world who laid the foundations for today’s thriving scenes. Keep an eye out for new episodes every week.

The FADER Interview The FADER

    • Music
    • 4.7 • 13 Ratings

The FADER Interview is a new podcast series in which the world’s most exciting musicians talk with the staff of The FADER about their latest projects. We’ll hear from emerging pop artists on the verge of mainstream breakthroughs, underground rappers pushing boundaries, and icons from across the world who laid the foundations for today’s thriving scenes. Keep an eye out for new episodes every week.

    Torres

    Torres

    Last March, when the world locked down, Mackenzie Scott was two weeks into a European tour behind Silver Tongue, her fourth album as Torres. She and her band were suddenly faced with the prospect of being stranded on the other side of the world, and, out of options, Scott asked her fans to donate money for emergency flights home. The response was overwhelming; by Saturday March 15, she was back in Brooklyn — grateful, exhausted, and apprehensive.
    Torres' new album, Thirstier, is, by design, Scott's most joyful yet: bold, grungey, and melodic, focused intently on light and not shade. It reflects the outlook that Scott worked to develop in the months that followed lockdown. Without a major project to work on or a tour on the horizon, Scott adjusted to domestic life with the person she loves in the home she loves in the city she loves. She wondered what point there was in conjuring up a new fantasy of the future when she seemed to be living in a fantasy already.
    She perhaps wouldn’t think of the chain of events so straightforwardly. On Silver Tongue she sang wide-eyed about falling in love with her now-fiancé, the artist Jenna Gribbon, in a past life; on Thirstier's "Hug From a Dinosaur" she goes even further, singing about dissolving clocks and vivid memories of a future that might have happened already. Scott was taught as a kid — growing up in a devout Christian household in Macon, Georgia — that existence was linear, and that heaven was only open to those who followed a narrow path; her albums have, increasingly ecstatically, rejected that notion. 
    Earlier this week I spoke to Scott about that cancelled tour and the struggle to be creative in lockdown, but mostly we talked about time, space, past lives, and the joy she wanted to express on Thirstier.
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    • 32 min
    Holly Herndon

    Holly Herndon

    Holly Herndon is an experimental composer based in Berlin, and her latest project isn’t an album, but something that has much deeper implications for music as a whole. It’s called Holly+, and it’s Herndon’s deepfake A.I. “digital twin.” Holly+ separates itself from other A.I. models in the complexity of sounds it’s able to work with and produce, as well as on a conceptual level. Holly+ will be overseen by a Decentralised Autonomous Organization, otherwise known as a DAO. It's a group of people selected by Herndon and Dryhurst that will officially license out Holly+ to approved artists, giving Herndon more control over her deepfaked likeness and what it's used to create.
    Herndon believes that technology like Holly+, if managed properly, can empower artists and give them control over their likeness in an era when frauds are only getting harder to spot. 
    One day after Holly+ went live, The FADER’s Jordan Darville spoke with Herndon about her intentions in creating the tool, the controversy surrounding NFTs, and who she hopes will give Holly+ a spin.
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    • 28 min
    Charlotte Day Wilson

    Charlotte Day Wilson

    In her hometown of Toronto, a place with no shortage of game-changing R&B talents, Charlotte Day Wilson has been a singular creative force. A singer-songwriter who records and produces her own work with a tenacious yet flexible vision, Day Wilson’s solo career exploded in 2016 behind her moody debut EP CDW and its centerpiece single “Work,” a plaintive gospel-tinged ballad that became an unofficial anthem of the Women’s March. The Stone Woman EP followed in 2018, and saw Day Wilson take stock of herself, her relationships, and her place in the world with both range and unimpeachable, traditional soul vocals. Wilson’s debut album Alpha, released last week, is her most varied statement to date. Like Stone Woman, Alpha is inspired by a breakup, but the project reveals more about Day Wilson — as a person and a songwriter — than ever before. With collaborations with Daniel Caesar, BADBADNOTGOOD, and Syd of The Internet, Alpha is not so much an announcement of a prodigious new talent as a confirmation of one. Days after Alpha’s release, The FADER’s Jordan Darville spoke with Day Wilson about learning new skills, navigating the music industry on her own terms, and two very key, very different influences.
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    • 30 min
    Shygirl

    Shygirl

    If anyone could make the case for releasing club music at a time in history when all the clubs are closed, it’s Shygirl. Back in November, the London artist dropped her biggest work to date, ALIAS, an EP that funneled her signature vulgarities through barreling beats and Bratz Doll-like avatars. Now, she’s emerging from lockdown as a cult icon, her lascivicious swagger dripping out of the rave and into the mainstream. Between the bloodcurdling scream from “UCKERS” going viral on TikTok, troves of memes parodying the stretched skin of the ALIAS cover art, a Burberry campaign, and a forthcoming Lady Gaga remix, it feels like Shygirl’s moment. On the heels of her new single with Slowthai, “BDE,” The FADER’s Salvatore Maicki caught up with Shy to discuss the aftermath of ALIAS, the challenges of filming her new short film BLU, and her many current textural fascinations.
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    • 35 min
    Lucy Dacus

    Lucy Dacus

    Three years ago Lucy Dacus started playing a song called Thumbs at her concerts. It was spare  but weighty, a violent fantasy backed up by little more than a thin synth line. In the song Dacus fantasized about physically hurting a friend’s mostly absent father as revenge for the mental anguish he’d caused his daughter, singing: “I would kill him / If you let me.” Dacus’s devoted fans fell for the song, but she insisted that they leave their phones in their pockets while she played it, to keep the experience special and intimate. And remarkably, through two years of touring, they agreed. A Twitter page that asked every day whether or not Dacus had officially released the by-then almost mythical song was finally given cause for celebration this March, when the track appeared on streaming services.
    “Thumbs” is now the centerpiece of Home Video, a striking third album on which the Richmond, Virginia-raised singer-songwriter throws herself back into her past, reliving often uncomfortable moments from adolescence through college, telling personal stories with impressive clarity and compassion. And while the songs are as emotionally resonant as they were on her previous albums — 2016’s No Burden, 2018’s Historian, and the same year’s self-titled EP as boygenius with Phoebe Bridgers and Julien Baker — there’s also wit and levity on Home Video. Shortly before the album’s release, The FADER’s Alex Robert Ross called Dacus at home in Philadelphia, where she moved shortly before lockdowns swept across the States, to talk about the way her relationship to a song changes before it’s released, the challenges of writing autobiography, and her unlikely spiritual journey to Tarot.


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    • 30 min
    Faye Webster

    Faye Webster

    In the two years since Faye Webster released her breakthrough third album Atlanta Millionaires Club on Secretly Canadian, the Atlanta musician, photographer, and yo-yo enthusiast fell in love, wrote a new album, and — with her chic, witty combinations of Americana, pop, and 70s R&B — became emblematic of a new kind of Gen Z hybrid music. This month, she releases I know I’m funny haha, a wittily-titled record that trades its predecessor’s tales of loneliness and heartbreak for songs about the trials and tribulations of long-term domesticity. Earlier this month, The FADER’s Shaad D’Souza called Webster to talk about finding inspiration in happiness, releasing a record on her birthday, and her favourite games. 
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    • 27 min

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5
13 Ratings

13 Ratings

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