7 episodes

Keys For Kids Ministries is a children's ministry organization, offering Keys for Kids, Down Gilead Lane, and much more.

Keys For Kids Ministries Podcast Keys For Kids Ministries

    • Religion & Spirituality
    • 4.6 • 304 Ratings

Keys For Kids Ministries is a children's ministry organization, offering Keys for Kids, Down Gilead Lane, and much more.

    Not Alone

    Not Alone

    I wish Mom wouldn't leave me home alone when she goes out at night, thought Ivy as she huddled under the ragged sheet on her bed. She felt her stomach rumble. Her mother had told her to find herself something to eat, but there hadn't been much in the cupboard other than a few crackers and peanut butter. Ivy hugged Ruffles, her teddy bear, close. "I'm so glad I got you back," she whispered. Ruffles was very old and worn, and Ivy's mother had tossed him into the trash. Just in time, Ivy had seen him there and rescued him.
    Ivy sighed. I wish every day were Wednesday, she thought. That was when Mrs. Adams came to the community center after school and taught a children's Bible club. "I love to hear about Jesus. He cares about everybody, even little kids and sick people," Ivy murmured as she remembered the Bible story Mrs. Adams had told the week before.
    "A man came to Jesus with a terrible disease--leprosy. It was a very contagious disease, and those who had it were covered with ugly sores, so lepers were sent to live alone outside the city," Mrs. Adams had explained. "No one wanted to come near them or touch them. But Jesus loved the sick man, and He reached out, touched the leper, and healed him. Jesus loves you that much too. He came to our broken world to save us and give us a new life with Him, and He promises to be with us in our troubles."
    Ivy looked at her teddy bear. Mom thought Ruffles was ugly because he's old and his stuffing is leaking out, so she threw him away, she thought. A tear slipped down her cheek. Sometimes I wonder if she thinks I'm ugly too. Sometimes she acts like she doesn't even want me. Ivy thought again of the story of the leper, and another one Mrs. Adams had told about Jesus inviting little children to come to him when others tried to shoo them away.
    "Thank You for loving me, Jesus," whispered Ivy. "Thank You for being with me
    all the time, even when I don't feel you there. I'm so glad I'm never really alone."
    Ivy's lips curved up in a smile as she hugged Ruffles closer to her, and soon she
    fell asleep.
    -Carolyn E. Yost

    The Winning Team

    The Winning Team

    "They'll never win! Look at the score," moaned Marco. He was spending the evening with his grandfather, who had suggested they watch a basketball game on TV. Marco loved basketball and couldn't sit still as his favorite team ran up and down the court. He jumped in delight when they scored but collapsed on the sofa when they missed a shot at the basket.
    "They're doing awful," Marco said in disgust when his team dropped several points behind. "We should be cheering for the other team." Marco stood up. "Maybe I'll go play with Sparky for a while."
    "Is that how you support your team?" Grandpa teased. "Come back and cheer them on."
    "It's not like they can hear me," muttered Marco, but he trudged back to his seat.
    A little later, a commercial came on. Grandpa hit a button on the remote, and the commercial zipped rapidly by.
    "Hey!" Marco pointed at the screen. "Is this game recorded?" Grandpa grinned and nodded. "So you already know how it's going to end!" said Marco.
    "I like it that way," said Grandpa. "There's less pressure with no surprise endings." He smiled and pointed to his Bible on the table. "That's one reason I'm so glad to have the Bible. It tells how the biggest match of all will end."
    "Grandpa! There's no story of a basketball game in the Bible," said Marco.
    "No," said Grandpa. "The match I'm talking about is much bigger than a basketball game. The Bible tells us about a battle being fought to win the world! Satan wants the hearts and minds of everyone, and sometimes it seems like he might be winning. Then the pressure for us to give up and desert our team--God's team--can be pretty great, especially when it seems like everyone is against us."
    "But we already know how the battle will end, don't we?" said Marco.
    Grandpa nodded. "We know Jesus is going to win that battle, because He already defeated Satan when He died on the cross and rose again to save us. When it's over, those who belong to Jesus will celebrate the victory with Him. That's one victory celebration you don't want to miss."
    -Heather Tekavec

    A Special Diet

    A Special Diet

    "Mom, how come Christians have such different ideas about right and wrong?" asked Avery one day. "You and Dad won't let us watch some movies that Stella's parents think are okay. And Naomi says her family avoids doing certain things on Sunday that we do almost every Sunday. Why can't Christians agree on what's right and what's wrong?"
    "There isn't a simple answer to that, but…" Mom hesitated. "We're having Uncle Paul and Aunt Sue over for dinner tonight, right? And we'll all eat quite differently. Aunt Sue has diabetes and avoids starchy foods. Uncle Paul is on a diet to lower his cholesterol."
    "And Daddy wants to lose weight." Avery giggled. "I guess he'll eat a big salad and not too much of the other stuff."
    Avery's brother Cole spoke up. "Yeah, but what does that have to do with it?"
    "Well, people have different physical conditions, so they have different dietary needs," said Mom. "And because Christians have different backgrounds and levels of maturity, they have different spiritual needs."
    "You mean, what's right for one person may not be right for another?" Cole asked.
    "Possibly," said Mom. "God may convict one believer about a certain activity because it would cause him--or those around him--to stumble in the Christian walk. Or someone may have a tender conscience about something because she had a bad experience related to it, or because of the way she was brought up. Then it would be wrong for her to take part in that activity, though it might not be harmful for someone else."
    "So, each person can decide what they can and can't do?" Avery asked.
    "Well, many things are spelled out so clearly in the Bible that there's no room to argue about them. As to things not specifically mentioned, we need to depend on the Holy Spirit to show us the best choice for us. We also need to be understanding of Christians who have different convictions than we do. They're our brothers and sisters in Christ who are loved and accepted by God just like we are--even though none of us is perfect."
    "Okay." Avery grinned. "One thing I know the Bible is clear about is for kids to obey their parents. So for now, I'll just ask you what I can do."
    -Sherry L. Kuyt

    The Race of Life (Part 2)

    The Race of Life (Part 2)

    Panting, Asher crossed the finish line in the big race at school. "Good job!" exclaimed Grandpa, who had come to watch. "Second place--that's great!"
    Asher grinned. "I wanted to take first," he said breathlessly, "but I knew George would probably beat me. Second's okay too."
    Several weeks later, when Asher got home from school, his mom told him Grandpa had been taken to the hospital. "We'll go see him after dinner," Mom said, "but you need to know that he's very, very ill."
    Mom was right. Grandpa was very weak, and as the days passed, he didn't seem to improve. Asher knew his parents were concerned about it.
    Asher was solemn as he entered his grandfather's hospital room one afternoon. "Hi, Asher," Grandpa said weakly. "Good to see you!"
    "I'm glad to see you too." Asher gave Grandpa a shaky smile. "I miss you, Gramps! I wish you could come home."
    "I miss you too," said Grandpa. He took Asher's hand. "I think I'll be going home soon, Asher," Grandpa added softly. "Home to be with Jesus. I'm eager to see Him."
    Asher gasped. "Grandpa! You don't mean you're gonna die, do you?"
    "That sounds awful to you, doesn't it? But remember that I'll be with Jesus."
    "But…but…" Asher stuttered.
    Grandpa smiled. "Asher, how did you feel when you were almost to the finish line in your race a couple months ago? Not there, but almost there."
    Asher couldn't help grinning as he remembered the race. "Pretty bad. My legs were sore, my chest hurt, I was hot and sweaty, and I wanted a drink." Then as he thought about it, he added, "But in a way, I felt great. I knew the race was almost over, and I knew I'd done my best."
    "That's exactly how I feel," said Grandpa gently. "Jesus saved me and helped me run a good life race for Him. Now my body is tired and sore, but I'm happy because I can see the finish line up ahead. I look forward to finally seeing Him and all the wonderful things He has prepared for me. Don't feel bad for me, Asher. It's almost time for me to get my prize!"
    "Okay," Asher whispered tearfully. "I know it's going to be a really good one!"
    -Sherry L. Kuyt

    The Race of Life (Part 1)

    The Race of Life (Part 1)

    "Gramps!" Asher called as he burst into his grandpa's house. "Next month we're going to have a big race at our school, and I'm going to be in it. I can't wait! There will be prizes and everything."
    Grandpa chuckled. "You'd better slow down, or you'll be worn out before the race starts," he teased. "If you're serious about running, it would be a good idea to cut down on junk foods. I ran a few races in my college days, and I remember the coach emphasizing the importance of a good diet."
    Asher groaned. "My gym teacher said the same thing, but I love candy and ice cream and potato chips! In fact, I love all the things they say are bad for you. How am I gonna live one whole month without all that good stuff?"
    "Well, you can eat it if you want to. It's up to you," said Grandpa. "Of course, if you're really serious about winning, you'll probably want to cut out anything that would keep you from reaching your goal."
    Asher thought for a moment. "I do want to win, and I'll do everything I can to come in first--even give up candy and stuff like that. The prize will be worth it."
    Grandpa nodded. "You know, Asher, the Bible compares our Christian lives to a race. Our goal is to run a good race before we cross the finish line and see Jesus face-to-face. To do well in the race of life, we may need to give up some things too."
    "Like what?" asked Asher.
    "Well, we might be holding on to sinful habits that are slowing us down--things like lying, gossiping, or a bad temper. Or maybe we're too focused on our own comfort and enjoyment, and we need to pick up the pace and find more ways to show the love of Jesus to those around us."
    Asher sighed. "That sounds even harder than giving up junk food for the race at school!"
    "Maybe, but don't forget that you're not running the race of life alone," said Grandpa. "Jesus is right by your side, and He will help you run a good race. Nothing we give up in this world can compete with the prize He won for us--eternal life with Him."
    -Sherry L. Kuyt

    Just Like Clockwork

    Just Like Clockwork

    Kaya walked into the living room and slumped onto the couch. Grandpa looked up from his work on the grandfather clock and laid aside a tool. "What's wrong?" he asked.
    Kaya picked at the fuzz on her jacket. "Oh, nothing. It's just that when the Millers came to church last Sunday, they were talking about all the amazing things they've seen God do in Brazil. After the service, I went up to them and explained that I wanted to help them with their missions work."
    "That's great, Kaya!" Grandpa said. "What's wrong with that?"
    "Well, I thought that maybe I could join them out in the jungle for the summer, but instead they said they needed help with their mailing. I just spent the last hour stuffing envelopes with letter updates for the Millers' ministry partners. I wish I could do something actually useful for missions work!"
    Grandpa furrowed his brow. "Come here," he said. Kaya joined him. "Do you see this gear?" Grandpa handed Kaya a small gear about the size of the dime.
    Kaya cradled it in her palm. "It's so small!"
    Grandpa gently opened a panel in the back of the clock.
    "Oh, wow!" Kaya exclaimed. Inside the grandfather clock was a labyrinth of gears, springs, wheels, and hooks.
    "It may not look like much," Grandpa said, "but this gear is essential to the working of the clock. When the clock didn't chime this afternoon, I opened it up and noticed this gear was out of place. I was just about to fix it when you walked in." Grandpa carefully put the gear back in the clock and shut the panel. Moving around to the front, he pushed the minute hand past the twelve, and the clock chimed. "The body of Christ is the same way. Each person who trusts in Jesus is part of His church, and we work together to help more people know about His love for them and what He did to save them. Even things that may look insignificant on the surface are an integral part of how Jesus uses us to reach others."
    "So even though I may not think stuffing envelopes is that exciting, I'm still serving Jesus?" asked Kaya.
    "Exactly!" Grandpa grinned. "Even the small parts make a big difference."
    -Olivia Summers

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5
304 Ratings

304 Ratings

LDTJW ,

Great little nugget for kids!

My daughter and I love this podcast. She feels grown up bc she has her very own podcast, and it teaches her great lessons. We love it and recommend to everyone!

RainbowKids436 ,

GOOD, VERY EDUCATIONAL

I listen to it on the to school almost EVERYDAY. SO GOOD

hthll ,

LOVE IT❤️

I love this but can you make them longer please

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