11 episodes

The Global Economic Governance Programme was established at University College in 2003 to foster research and debate into how global markets and institutions can better serve the needs of people in developing countries. The Programme is directly linked to Oxford University’s Department of Politics and International Relations and Centre for International Studies. It serves as an interdisciplinary umbrella within Oxford drawing together members of the Departments of Economics, Law and Development Studies working on these issues and linking them to an international research network.

Global Economic Governance Programme Oxford University

    • Education
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The Global Economic Governance Programme was established at University College in 2003 to foster research and debate into how global markets and institutions can better serve the needs of people in developing countries. The Programme is directly linked to Oxford University’s Department of Politics and International Relations and Centre for International Studies. It serves as an interdisciplinary umbrella within Oxford drawing together members of the Departments of Economics, Law and Development Studies working on these issues and linking them to an international research network.

    The Future of International Aid

    The Future of International Aid

    On 28 February, renowned aid expert Richard Manning delivered a GEG Special Lecture on the future of multilateral aid. Former Chair of the OECD’s Development Assistance Committee, Richard recently served as Vice Chair of the Global Fund for AIDS, TB and Malaria’s replenishment and as Coordinator of the Replenishment of the African Development Fund, the soft-loan arm of the African Development Bank. Richard’s remarks focused on these two replenishments, as well as that of the International Development Association, the principal source of World Bank funding for low-income countries. He noted that, contrary to the fears that austerity-focused Western governments would cut back on multilateral aid commitments, for the most part governments maintained or even increased their contributions. However, emerging donors in general did not significantly increase their core funding contributions, although some – notably China – have demonstrated interest in engaging with multilateral banks in new and creative ways. Richard also argued that the governance of multilateral institutions continues to lag behind shifting economic realities, and that the BRICs deserve a say in these institutions commensurate with their weight in the global economy. Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

    • 36 min
    The Future of International Aid (Slides)

    The Future of International Aid (Slides)

    On 28 February, renowned aid expert Richard Manning delivered a GEG Special Lecture on the future of multilateral aid. Former Chair of the OECD’s Development Assistance Committee, Richard recently served as Vice Chair of the Global Fund for AIDS, TB and Malaria’s replenishment and as Coordinator of the Replenishment of the African Development Fund, the soft-loan arm of the African Development Bank. Richard’s remarks focused on these two replenishments, as well as that of the International Development Association, the principal source of World Bank funding for low-income countries. He noted that, contrary to the fears that austerity-focused Western governments would cut back on multilateral aid commitments, for the most part governments maintained or even increased their contributions. However, emerging donors in general did not significantly increase their core funding contributions, although some – notably China – have demonstrated interest in engaging with multilateral banks in new and creative ways. Richard also argued that the governance of multilateral institutions continues to lag behind shifting economic realities, and that the BRICs deserve a say in these institutions commensurate with their weight in the global economy. Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

    Civil Conflict in the Current Era: New Patterns or Same Old?

    Civil Conflict in the Current Era: New Patterns or Same Old?

    Global Economic Governance Seminar, 9 November 2012. Has there been, as many have argued, a precipitous decline in civil conflicts during the past decade? What are the underlying drivers of civil conflicts in the current era, and how do they differ from previous eras? Drawing from this analysis, what international and national policy responses are likely to be most, and least, effective in settling such conflicts? The panel for this session is: Richard Caplan, Professor of International Relations, Oxford, Monica Duffy Toft, Professor of Government and Public Policy at the Blavatnik School of Government and Dr Anke Hoeffler, Research Officer, Center for the Study of African Economies, Oxford Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

    • 1 hr 14 min
    Fiscal Policy in an Emerging Market Economy

    Fiscal Policy in an Emerging Market Economy

    Former Chilean Minister of Finance and Fellow of the Center for International Development at Harvard, Andres Velasco, delivered a lecture on the subject 'Fiscal policy in natural resource intensive countries: some theory and the experience of Chile.'.

    • 57 min
    Governing Climate Change After Copenhagen

    Governing Climate Change After Copenhagen

    Ngaire Woods chairs a panel discussion looking into the political, economic and environmental consequences of the Copenhagen Climate Change Conference last year. Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

    • 25 min
    Laurence Whitehead; Haiti after the Earthquake

    Laurence Whitehead; Haiti after the Earthquake

    Laurence Whitehead talks about the extent of the damage done in Haiti by the earthquake of last year and how the people of Haiti are coping with living after the disaster. Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

    • 18 min

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