12 episodes

The Cantemir Institute (CI) is a recently established centre of research at the Faculty of History, University of Oxford, which focuses on the interdisciplinary study of Central and Eastern Europe in its wider European, Eurasian, Mediterranean, and global contexts. The creation of the institute has been made possible through a generous donation from the Berendel Foundation, London.

The Cantemir Institute aims to reflect critically on the legacy of intercultural humanism bestowed by two humanist princes: Demetrius Cantemir (1673-1723), the ruling prince of Moldavia (1693; 1710-11), and his son Antiochus (1709-1744), Russia's ambassador to London and Paris (1731-1744). These distinguished polymaths were steeped in the intellectual culture of both Eastern and Western Europe and knowledgeable about the Ottoman and the Russian empires.

Cantemir Institute Oxford University

    • Education
    • 5.0 • 1 Rating

The Cantemir Institute (CI) is a recently established centre of research at the Faculty of History, University of Oxford, which focuses on the interdisciplinary study of Central and Eastern Europe in its wider European, Eurasian, Mediterranean, and global contexts. The creation of the institute has been made possible through a generous donation from the Berendel Foundation, London.

The Cantemir Institute aims to reflect critically on the legacy of intercultural humanism bestowed by two humanist princes: Demetrius Cantemir (1673-1723), the ruling prince of Moldavia (1693; 1710-11), and his son Antiochus (1709-1744), Russia's ambassador to London and Paris (1731-1744). These distinguished polymaths were steeped in the intellectual culture of both Eastern and Western Europe and knowledgeable about the Ottoman and the Russian empires.

    Two opposed catholic nationalisms: Ukrainian Galicians in the Second Polish Republic (1923-1939)

    Two opposed catholic nationalisms: Ukrainian Galicians in the Second Polish Republic (1923-1939)

    Dr Alessandro Milani (EHESS, Paris) gives a talk for the Cantemir Institute East and East-Central Europe seminar series. Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

    • 29 min
    Family systems in historic Poland-Lithuania: Demographic perspectives on civilisational divide in Eastern Europe

    Family systems in historic Poland-Lithuania: Demographic perspectives on civilisational divide in Eastern Europe

    Mikolaj Szoltysek (Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock) gives a talk for the Cantemir Institute on 12th February 2013. Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

    • 1 hr
    Encountering and Appropriating Cityscapes: Lviv and Wroclaw after 1944/45

    Encountering and Appropriating Cityscapes: Lviv and Wroclaw after 1944/45

    Sofia Dyak (Center for Urban History, Lviv) gives a talk for the Cantemir Institute. Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

    • 49 min
    Abbasid Culture and the Universal History of Freethinking

    Abbasid Culture and the Universal History of Freethinking

    Professor Al-Azmeh, Professor in the School of Historical and Interdisciplinary Studies, Central European University, Budapest, gives a talk for the Cantemir Institute. The purpose of the lecture is to inform; to highlight elements pertaining to humanist freethinking in the Abbasid era, to relate these to an overarching history of humanist freethinking with classical antecedents and later workings in early modern Europe, no less than to their milieus of emergence and to what some might still think of as an early Muslim orthodoxy. In so doing, this lecture will seek to redress a number of imbalances in perspective, and a number of misconceptions. Of these, the idea that Abbasid freethinking was an aberrant curiosity in a milieu which was, in essence, 'orthodox,' is a resilient one. So also is underestimating the Fortleben of ideas generated in the Abbasid milieu in early European modernity. The lecture is intended to inform and sketch a very general picture of this little-known chapter in history. The suggestion made in conclusion is that a model for the historical interpretation of Arab freethinking based upon the introverted model of pre-Humanist European history, or that of contemporary Muslim, protestantised pietism, is clearly anachronistic. Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

    • 44 min
    Utopia and Terror: How interdisciplinary methodologies can help us understand violent societies. The example of Croatian Ustasha regime

    Utopia and Terror: How interdisciplinary methodologies can help us understand violent societies. The example of Croatian Ustasha regime

    Part of the Cantemir Institute seminar series. Rory Yeomans, senior research analyst at the Ministry of Justice, gives a talk on how interdisciplinary methodologies help us understand violent societies. Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

    • 42 min
    Bygone Glories and Frivolous Pleasures: The Rococo Revival and National Identity in Austrian and Hungarian Art, 1840-1860

    Bygone Glories and Frivolous Pleasures: The Rococo Revival and National Identity in Austrian and Hungarian Art, 1840-1860

    Part of the East and Est-Central Europe Seminar series. Dr Nóra Veszprémi (Cantemir Fellow, Budapest) gives a talk on art and identity in Austria and Hungary in the mid 19th Century. Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

    • 45 min

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