6 episodes

Achieving an end-state of "zero" has emerged as an important policy goal for a number of 21st Century challenges. The most prominent example is the "Global Zero" campaign to eliminate nuclear weapons. Yet, in a century of globalization, when the life of every individual is directly affected by a vast network of forces beyond their control, this concept has the power to inspire action on some of the most intractable problems of our time.

Getting to Zero: Michaelmas Term Seminar Series 2009 Oxford University

    • Education

Achieving an end-state of "zero" has emerged as an important policy goal for a number of 21st Century challenges. The most prominent example is the "Global Zero" campaign to eliminate nuclear weapons. Yet, in a century of globalization, when the life of every individual is directly affected by a vast network of forces beyond their control, this concept has the power to inspire action on some of the most intractable problems of our time.

    Global Eradication of Infectious Diseases: Can 'Not Very Much' undermine the goal of 'None at All'?

    Global Eradication of Infectious Diseases: Can 'Not Very Much' undermine the goal of 'None at All'?

    Despite the well-publicised success of global smallpox eradication, 'zero' remains an elusive goal for the majority of vaccine-preventable diseases, making reduced pathogen circulation, or direct protection of the vulnerable more achievable strategies. We will consider potential deleterious consequences of reduced infection transmission, in the context of diseases such as influenza and pertussis, where immunity following natural exposure may be superior to that following immunisation. Implications for vaccine design and implementation will be discussed. This seminar was delivered by Dr Jodie McVernon: Programme Leader, Mathematical Modelling. Deputy Head, Vaccine and Immunisation Research Group, Melbourne School of Population Health, Australia. Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

    • 49 min
    A New Approach to Nuclear Disarmament: Learning from International Humanitarian Law Success

    A New Approach to Nuclear Disarmament: Learning from International Humanitarian Law Success

    Achieving an end-state of "zero" has emerged as an important policy goal for a number of 21st Century challenges. The most prominent example is the "Global Zero" campaign to eliminate nuclear weapons. Few issues are more appropriate subjects of humanitarian concern and international humanitarian law than the choice, possession, use and misuse of weapons. A body of International Humanitarian Law (IHL) and Disarmament Treaty Law has been built up over the last century to control and prohibit a range of weapons and weapons use. IHL and the social norms and values on which it is based, are the tools by which humanity has protected itself from misuse of its technical capacities for destruction and demonstrated its capacity for wisdom. Recent successes in disarmament through the merging of international humanitarian law and disarmament treaty law could be built upon to push for a radical, practical approach to nuclear disarmament, putting people and human frailty at the centre of the debate and being focused on achieving a safer world, free from nuclear weapons. This seminar was delivered by Dr Patricia Lewis: Deputy Director, James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies, California, USA. Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

    • 43 min
    Dealing with doctrines: time to outlaw nuclear weapon use?

    Dealing with doctrines: time to outlaw nuclear weapon use?

    Achieving an end-state of "zero" has emerged as an important policy goal for a number of 21st Century challenges. The most prominent example is the "Global Zero" campaign to eliminate nuclear weapons. To stand any chance of getting near to zero, nuclear weapons must be marginalised in military and security doctrines. That means creating international norms and, if feasible, agreements that until nuclear weapons are universally prohibited by treaty, their use will be treated as a crime against humanity. Dr Johnson considers how the problems of doctrine and use could be addressed. This seminar was delivered by Dr Rebecca Johnson: Executive Director, Acronym Institute for Disarmament Diplomacy, London. Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

    • 40 min
    Bottom billion or bottom zero? Policies for international poverty reduction

    Bottom billion or bottom zero? Policies for international poverty reduction

    Some developing countries have achieved rapid economic growth and poverty reduction while others have stagnated. This talk will review the determinants of success and the prospects for lagging regions to improve performance and eliminate poverty. Achieving an end-state of "zero" has emerged as an important policy goal for a number of 21st Century challenges. The most prominent example is the "Global Zero" campaign to eliminate nuclear weapons. Yet, in a century of globalization, when the life of every individual is directly affected by a vast network of forces beyond their control, this concept has the power to inspire action on some of the most intractable problems of our time. Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

    • 43 min
    Eliminating Nuclear Weapons

    Eliminating Nuclear Weapons

    The Rt Hon Sir Malcolm Rifkind MP on how, in the 21st century, nuclear weapons pose a greater danger than ever before and their possession is less necessary. The time has come to forge agreement on a process of multilateral disarmament. Achieving an end-state of "zero" has emerged as an important policy goal for a number of 21st Century challenges. The most prominent example is the "Global Zero" campaign to eliminate nuclear weapons. Yet, in a century of globalization, when the life of every individual is directly affected by a vast network of forces beyond their control, this concept has the power to inspire action on some of the most intractable problems of our time. Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

    • 40 min
    Zero chance? Aiming for zero in weapons control

    Zero chance? Aiming for zero in weapons control

    These seminars were run by the Oxford Martin School (formerly the James Martin 21st Century School) in association with the Oxford Institute for Ethics, Law and Armed Conflict. Three intersecting considerations will be examined for their relevance in assessing the wisdom of adopting 'zero' as the goal for an international initiative: 1) Tactics: Whether and how framing an issue in terms of getting to zero can be a successful technique for issue advocates? 2) Diplomatic strategy: What is the wisdom of going ahead with a major initiative even without key players? 3) Ethics: Even if we forecast that a campaign of getting to zero is not likely to be entirely or even terribly successful, can initiatives of getting to zero still recommend themselves ethically nonetheless or even be plausibly counted as moral imperatives? This seminar was delivered by Professor Richard Price: Department of Political Science, University of British Columbia, Canada. Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

    • 1 hr 2 min

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