23 episodes

Translational and Clinical Medicine is the ongoing effort to bring basic science from the bench to the patient, as well as to elucidate safety and effectiveness of the medicines on which we depend. The NDM podcasts on translational and clinical medicine detail our work in this wide-ranging field, from the identification and design of new medicines to clinical trials and trial design and regulation.

Translational and Clinical Oxford University

    • Education

Translational and Clinical Medicine is the ongoing effort to bring basic science from the bench to the patient, as well as to elucidate safety and effectiveness of the medicines on which we depend. The NDM podcasts on translational and clinical medicine detail our work in this wide-ranging field, from the identification and design of new medicines to clinical trials and trial design and regulation.

    • video
    Why we work on Alzheimer’s disease

    Why we work on Alzheimer’s disease

    Housed within the Target Discovery Institute, the Alzheimer’s Research UK Oxford Drug Discovery Institute (ODDI) juxtaposes drug discovery expertise alongside scientific and academic understanding of patients, disease mechanisms and model systems. The burden caused by Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias represents one of the biggest problems for our healthcare systems. The last medicine was approved in 2002 and today we only have symptomatic treatments. ARUK-ODDI brings together chemists, biologist, psychiatrists and neuroscientists, many of them with pharmaceutical background, aiming to accelerate the discovery of novel and effective treatments. Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

    • 6 min
    • video
    Tracking infections

    Tracking infections

    Professor Derrick Crook from our Experimental Medicine division tells us about his research on tracking infections Professor Derrick Crook's research consortium focusses on translating new molecular technologies and advances in informatics into the investigation of microbial transmission, diagnosis of infectious disease and identifying outbreaks of communicable disease. This research aims to translate deep sequencing of pathogens on an epidemiological scale for tracking infections, and is focussed on four different major pathogens: Staphylococcus aureus (including MRSA), Clostridium difficile, Norovirus and Mycobacterium tuberculosis.
    Understanding how an infection spreads is vitally important for prevention. Whole genome sequencing of microorganisms allows us to construct family trees of infections, from donnor to recipients, and understand how microbes behave in general. Through its genetic code, we can also predict whether a germ is susceptible or resistant to a specific antibiotic, and give patients a more stratified and personalised treatment. Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

    • 6 min
    • video
    X-rays for drug discovery

    X-rays for drug discovery

    Professor Frank von Delft works to ensure that X-ray structures can serve as a routine and predictive tool for generating novel chemistry for targeting proteins. In the process of drug discovery, X-ray crystallography is the most sensitive way to find out which compounds bind to a target protein. Recent advances in technology allow researchers to test many more compounds, much more rapidly. The ultimate aim is to bring much needed new treatments to patients. Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

    • 7 min
    • video
    From information to structure

    From information to structure

    Dr Brian Marsden aims to make structural and chemical biology data accessible to non-experts, by providing computational resources including data management, sample tracking, in silico modelling support plus provision of public access to SGC data. Protein structures are powerful tools in the development of medical drugs, but they are not very accessible to non-specialists. Research informatics presents these structures more simply and interactively, and helps scientists make decisions. This will hopefully accelerate the development of new medicines. Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

    • 5 min
    • video
    Unravelling proteins

    Unravelling proteins

    Dr Nicola Burgess-Brown heads the Biotechnology Group at the SGC, which generates proteins suitable for structural and functional studies. Recombinant protein expression in host cells such as bacterial or insect cells facilitates the production of large amounts of proteins, which can be used for crystallisation to obtain the protein structure, or in cellular assays to look at their function. Collaborations with partners such as academics, industry and patient groups aim to find compounds that can be developed into potential drugs. Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

    • 6 min
    • video
    Targeting drug discovery

    Targeting drug discovery

    The development of new medicines is dependent on the identification of novel drug targets. CHEMICAL BIOLOGY

    In the search for new medicines for cancer or inflammatory disorders, small molecules are invaluable tools for testing the activity of possible target proteins. Those small chemical compounds can also affect the morphology and phenotype of cell samples collected from patients, opening the possibility to develop new therapeutics. Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

    • 3 min

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