131 episodes

Life is complicated, but we love simple answers. AI and robotics are changing the nature of work. Emojis change the way we write. Fossil Fuels were once the engine of progress, now we're in a race to change how we power the planet. We're constantly trying to save ourselves...from ourselves. This Anthro Life brings you smart conversations with humanity’s top makers and minds to make sense of it all. We dig into truth and hope in our creative potential through design, culture, and technology. Change your perspective. Crafted + Hosted by Dr. Adam Gamwell. From Missing Link Studios in Boston, MA. Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/thisanthrolife/support

This Anthro Life Missing Link Studios

    • Social Sciences
    • 4.6 • 54 Ratings

Life is complicated, but we love simple answers. AI and robotics are changing the nature of work. Emojis change the way we write. Fossil Fuels were once the engine of progress, now we're in a race to change how we power the planet. We're constantly trying to save ourselves...from ourselves. This Anthro Life brings you smart conversations with humanity’s top makers and minds to make sense of it all. We dig into truth and hope in our creative potential through design, culture, and technology. Change your perspective. Crafted + Hosted by Dr. Adam Gamwell. From Missing Link Studios in Boston, MA. Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/thisanthrolife/support

    Getting Down to Business and Making a Career with Anthropology: Guest Podcast w Adam Gamwell on Anthro Perspectives

    Getting Down to Business and Making a Career with Anthropology: Guest Podcast w Adam Gamwell on Anthro Perspectives

    This Anthro Life is based on lifting up the voices and value of anthropologists and human scientists in all fields through sharing their stories, thought leadership, struggles, and winding paths. Today we've got something special, where we turn the mic around on our host, Adam Gamwell and hear some of his story on how he is building a career as an anthropologist. TAL's Adam Gamwell recently guested on fellow business anthropologist Keith Kellersohn's new YouTube series Anthro Perspectives, where he interviews anthropologists in industry and businesses about their work. This episode has a bit of everything:


    whether you're an anthropology student in school looking to get your first job, 
    an academic looking to move into industry, 
    if you're already working somewhere out there and looking to change careers, 
    or perhaps if you don't work anthropologists and you want to find out and understand value anthropology can bring to your business. 

    We cover all of this and more in our conversation. 

    One of the most helpful things in these scenarios I find is hearing other people's stories about how they did it or are doing it, or even how they just stumbled around in the dark and making it up as they went along and still came out with some kind of experience. I think perhaps the latter is closer to my own story. 

    So I invite you to join me for a chat about career paths, learning to articulate the value anthropology. Social sciences provide to businesses and a bit about why I do what I do. Thanks to Keith for sharing this episode.

    Check out the world's first Neuromarketing Bootcamp and sign up today with our Affiliate link!

    Neuromarketing Bootcamp by Neuroscientist Matt Johnson and Marketing Director Prince Ghuman 

    | Use offer code ANTHROLIFE for $500 off: Affiliate link: https://www.popneuro.com/neuromarketing-bootcamp

    Episode Art: Sara Schmieder
    Music: Epidemic Sounds


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    • 52 min
    Death Work: The Life and Culture of Forensics with Lilly White

    Death Work: The Life and Culture of Forensics with Lilly White

    When most people think of forensics or forensic anthropology the first thing that comes to mind are TV shows like CSI or Bones, or maybe in Six Feet Under.

    This may sound overly obvious, but people die every day. And this means that every day someone has to deliver dealth notifications to next of kin, especially when people live apart. Often times coroners are the ones who deliver these notifications. Coroners are elected or appointed public officials whose primary duty is to determine and certify cause of death.

    and while they have the scientific knowledge to do so, sometimes with the help of apps and digital tools, the social part of dealing with death, both for next of kin and the coroners themselves, is often ignored.

    We all experience death at some point but across 2020 more people have been directly impacted by death than ever before due to COVID-19. Meaning that more people than ever are receiving death notifications, which was a difficult conversation even before the pandemic. These notifications are challenging to give, Imagine knocking on a door or picking up the phone delivering the news that someone has passed away. It’s essential work. And it’s not easy. It’s also deeply social and cultural.

    This is why I’m talking to Lilly White a forensic anthropologist who focuses on the cultural side of forensics, especially on the lives of coroners and medical examiners and the best ways to handle death notifications. Lily got her PhD from the University of Montana in 2019 and currently owns and operates Bones and Stone Anthroscience with her husband.

    So today we’ll be talking about how cultural anthropology can play a role in forensic anthropology especially with death notifications.

    Top Takeaways


    We dig into the unseen/secret life of coroners (from a cultural perspective)

    Death notice work is essential but emotionally difficult so there’s a struggle keeping coroners in the practice

    The challenges of scientific training and having to deliver the worst possible news; the mix of scientific and social knowledge

    We’ll open the conversation like I often like to do, with Lily’s story and how she found her way into forensics and forensic anthropology, what life is like training to be a coroner, and her path to running her own forensics business today.


    Read about Lilly’s work in NYC with COVID-19 deaths (University of Montana)

    Lilly’s Instagram: Bone & Stone Anthrosciences (@deathphd) • Instagram photos and videos

    What is a Coroner?



    Episode art: Sara Schmieder


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    • 46 min
    How to Study Meaning at Scale: AI and Big Data Ethnography, Microcultures and the Future of Innovation w/ Ujwal Arkalgud

    How to Study Meaning at Scale: AI and Big Data Ethnography, Microcultures and the Future of Innovation w/ Ujwal Arkalgud

    Artificial Intelligence. Natural Language Processing. Machine Learning. Big Data. If you've studied Anthropology at all, you'll likely notice these terms don't often get use, unless you happen to be studying one of these areas, like doing an ethnography on artificial intelligence. Yet if these tools are used everyday across millions of applications and software lines of code to make our world run, how might they help us understand ourselves better? Big data often gets used to understand patterns people's behavior and thinking at a high level, and it is common to see people split into segments from this data.

    So in the world of market and consumer research you may know that people are commonly categorized into segments or generations - you've likely seen people written about as Millennial or Baby Boomers (OK, Boomer). But what limitations to understanding people are present when putting them into segments and generations and only seeing them from a high level? That's often where ethnography comes in, and where anthropologists like to live with and get to know people on their terms. But there's a huge stretch between massive Big Data sets and individual ethnography, right?

    What if there were a way to do ethnography with big data? That is, what if there were a way to be able to understand the nuances of cultural meaning people assign to things from big data sets? What this entails is, in essence quantifying ethnography. And turns out, the key has to do with focusing on meaning. That and some computer science wizardry.

    I'm excited today to have on the show one of the pioneers in this field, Ujwal Arkalgud, CEO, cultural anthropologist, and co-founder of Motivbase, a global tech research firm that has cracked the cultural code and developed software and research tools that bring together the analytical power of anthropology and the wide reach of big data.

    We’ll dig into


    the concept of micro cultures, which are are a set of meanings that make up a market space,

    the need to study of meaning and behavior in business, why don’t companies think about meaning as a primary mover?

    why traditional market research doesn’t effectively get at meaning,

    how the internet has changed the way we make culture and meaning and that betting on cultural homogenization is a trap


    Checkout Movitbase here

    Microcultures: Understanding the consumer forces that will shape the future of your business

    Ujwal's Medium page

    If you enjoy This Anthro Life, please consider supporting the show with $5 - $20 a month on Patreon. We're self funded so rely on you to help make the show happen!


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    • 51 min
    Cyberpsychology: How Life Online Shapes our Minds and What We Can Do About It w Julie Ancis

    Cyberpsychology: How Life Online Shapes our Minds and What We Can Do About It w Julie Ancis

    It's no surprise that many of us find ourselves increasingly on mobile devices or the internet. We shop online with ease, connect with friends and family on social media, check the news, and play games. And especially during the era of COVID millions, more people are figuring out if they can work remotely. 

    In this episode, Adam sits down with Dr. Julie Ancis, one  of the world's leading cyberpsychologists to talk about how digital technology in life online is impacting the ways we think and interact with one another.  As an interdisciplinary scholar, practitioner, and pioneer in the field, Dr. Julie Ancis is starting as Director and Professor of an exciting new Cyberpsychology program at the New Jersey Institute of Technology and currently writes for the new Cyberpsychology blog for Psychology Today where she's been offering advice on how to practice mental wellbeing as so many of us move online, especially during the time of COVID.

    Digital technology can be a blessing and a curse, right? Connecting us in new ways to old friends, but it can also be addicting, cause people to unfairly compare themselves to one another on social media to feel more lonely even. When it comes to things like the news, it can be more difficult to discern fact from opinion. But don't worry. It's not all zoom and gloom. What we'll find is that it's up to us to become discerning critical thinkers about our own psychology and the psychology of others when it comes to life online. And understanding that we do in fact have the tools each and every one of us to become critical thinkers. And, if you feel like you want to learn and get an even better handle on it, there's a brand new cyber psychology program at NJIT launching just around the corner.

    Dr. Julie Ancis

    Ancis Consulting

    New Jersey Institute of Technology Cyberpsychology Program

    Psychology Today Cyberpsychology Blog

    Catch Julie on:

    Twitter

    Facebook

    Instagram 

    Checkout my This Anthro Life sister project Mindshare

    And our upcoming panel “Ethics are for Everyone: Four Anthropologists Talk Shop on ethics across design, business and technology” Eventbrite registration here


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    • 1 hr 8 min
    A Neuroscientist and Marketer walk into a bar: Neuromarketing and the hidden ways marketing reshapes our brains with Matt Johnson and Prince Ghuman

    A Neuroscientist and Marketer walk into a bar: Neuromarketing and the hidden ways marketing reshapes our brains with Matt Johnson and Prince Ghuman

    Ever wonder why certain new ideas stick while others don’t? We often hear a lot about innovation when it comes to new ideas, but really that’s only part of the equation. Psychology, marketing, neuroscience - and yes - anthropology can help us make sense of why some new ideas stick while others fall flat.

    On this episode Adam Gamwell talks with neuroscientist Dr. Matt Johnson and Professor of marketing Prince Ghuman about the fascinating role neuroscience plays in our evolving consumer lives. Matt and Prince have a new book out called Blindsight: the (Mostly) Hidden Ways Marketing Reshapes our Brains that explores the emerging field of neuromarketing.

    This is a fascinating conversation that gets into the neuroscience, marketing, and psychology of why we consume, why certain kinds of advertisements work for different groups of people, and -something long time listeners of This Anthro Life know - the need to clearly communicate our work as human, Neuro, and social scientists to other disciplines and people in general. And speaking of that, we dig into one of Adam's favorite subjects of all time - Star Wars - to figure out why nostalgia marketing can be so powerful.


    Book link: getbook.at/blindsight
    Blog link: https://www.popneuro.com/neuromarketing-blog
    Bio: https://www.popneuro.com/blog-authors
    Twitter: @pop_neuro
    Prince Ghuman’s Twitter @princeghuman248
    Matt Johnson’s Twitter: @mattjohnsonisme
    Instagram: @pop.neuro


    on LinkedIn: Prince Ghuman and Matt Johnson, PhD.


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    • 47 min
    The Connected Cup: Coffee, Tea, Happiness and Visual Storytelling Around the Globe with Documentarian Brooke Bierhaus

    The Connected Cup: Coffee, Tea, Happiness and Visual Storytelling Around the Globe with Documentarian Brooke Bierhaus

    What is it about coffee and tea - two simple drinks - that both transcends culture and is intimately bound up by it? In this episode, Adam talks with Independent documentary filmmaker and coffee anthropologist Brooke Bierhaus about her film "The Connected Cup" which explores the heart of coffee and tea as global human connectors across cultures and backgrounds. For the film Brooke traveled to over 9 countries to film and capture intimate moments, stories, and portraits of human life around the connected cup. 

    We dig into:


    Brooke's process for filming across 9 countries
    how coffee and tea provide a window into what makes the good life and happiness
    cultures of coffee and tea around the globe
    narrative and ethnographic voice as part of filmmaking

    https://www.theconnectedcup.com/

    https://www.instagram.com/itsbrookebierhaus/

    https://www.imdb.com/name/nm10149658/

    Brooke's Bio from IMDB: Brooke Bierhaus is an American award-winning documentary filmmaker and visual storyteller. Brooke is known for her feature film, "The Connected Cup", following the heart of coffee and tea around the world as a global language of connection. Brooke has worked and produced stories in 22 countries.


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    • 48 min

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5
54 Ratings

54 Ratings

Meiyan2014 ,

Very Informative and Engaging

Great podcast! I love the episode on climate finance. It was very accessible and is food for thought! Thank you for sharing your knowledge and research with the public. Two thumbs up!

alejh ,

Keep it coming!

I'm an anthropologist myself and it's hard to keep up to date with the debates since I'm not in academia. This show is a good way to do just that. Additionally, it matches insightful and sometimes theoretical conversations with contemporary topics in a way that is a breeze to listen to.

nshau ,

Order of episodes

I just found your podcast and want to “catch up” but the order of the episodes on iTunes and online are not chronological. It’s very confusing, you talk about something and then I realize it’s the last episode or from another season. Help?

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