21 episodes

This lecture series constitutes a first undergraduate course in solid state physics delivered in an engaging and entertaining manner by Professor Steven H. Simon of Oxford University. Standard topics such as crystal structure, reciprocal space, free electrons, band theory, phonons, and magnetism are covered. The sequence of the lectures matches that of the book "The Oxford Solid State Basics" (OUP, 2013).

The Oxford Solid State Basics Oxford University

    • Education
    • 4.8 • 10 Ratings

This lecture series constitutes a first undergraduate course in solid state physics delivered in an engaging and entertaining manner by Professor Steven H. Simon of Oxford University. Standard topics such as crystal structure, reciprocal space, free electrons, band theory, phonons, and magnetism are covered. The sequence of the lectures matches that of the book "The Oxford Solid State Basics" (OUP, 2013).

    • video
    01. Introduction to Condensed Matter; Einstein Model of Vibrations in Solids

    01. Introduction to Condensed Matter; Einstein Model of Vibrations in Solids

    First in a series of 21 lectures on solid state physics, delivered by Professor Steven H. Simon in early 2014. Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

    • 44 min
    • video
    02. Debye Model of Vibrations in Solids; Drude Theory of Electrons in Metals

    02. Debye Model of Vibrations in Solids; Drude Theory of Electrons in Metals

    Lecture 2 in a series of 21 lectures on solid state physics, delivered by Professor Steven H. Simon in early 2014. Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

    • 45 min
    • video
    03. Drude Theory of Electrons in Metals / Sommerfeld (Free Electron) Theory of Electrons in Metals

    03. Drude Theory of Electrons in Metals / Sommerfeld (Free Electron) Theory of Electrons in Metals

    Lecture 3 in a series of 21 lectures on solid state physics, delivered by Professor Steven H. Simon in early 2014. Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

    • 46 min
    • video
    04. Sommerfeld (Free Electron) Theory of Electrons in Metals

    04. Sommerfeld (Free Electron) Theory of Electrons in Metals

    Lecture 4 in a series of 21 lectures on solid state physics, delivered by Professor Steven H. Simon in early 2014. Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

    • 50 min
    • video
    05. Chemistry in a Nutshell

    05. Chemistry in a Nutshell

    Lecture 5 in a series of 21 lectures on solid state physics, delivered by Professor Steven H. Simon in early 2014. Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

    • 50 min
    • video
    06. Microscopic View of Vibrations in Solids in One Dimension I: The Monatomic Harmonic Chain

    06. Microscopic View of Vibrations in Solids in One Dimension I: The Monatomic Harmonic Chain

    Lecture 6 in a series of 21 lectures on solid state physics, delivered by Professor Steven H. Simon in early 2014. Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

    • 48 min

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
10 Ratings

10 Ratings

Spacelover17 ,

Excellent set of lectures for an introductory condensed-matter course

I'm going to be taking solid state physics this fall, and while I usually prefer textbooks over lectures, Ashcroft and Mermin is too dense for me to want to read as more than a reference and for the practice problems, and unfortunately MIT OCW doesn't have as much material available for condensed matter as it tends to for other physics courses.

I found this lecture series to be very engaging. The professor is funny and he grounds the lectures well in motivation. The book that follows this series best is his own textbook for undergraduates, but it begins with an approach similar to Ashcroft and Mermin (but better, in my opinion) in that he presents improvements to heat capacity models sequentially, showing how each improvement adhered better to data than the previous model. I look forward to continuing his series.

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