7 episodes

Indigeneity Conversations is a podcast series that features deep and engaging conversations with Native culture bearers, scholars, movement leaders, and non-Native allies on the most important issues and solutions in Indian Country. The series also features excerpts from our Indigenous Forum, a sovereign space and touchstone for Native leaders and non-Native allies to come together at our annual Bioneers Conference, and to create and grow strategic alliances.
Indigeneity Conversations explores compelling issues such as Indigenous Land Return, Cultural Appropriation, Rights of Nature and other essential conversations that exemplify the essential leadership role that Indigenous cultures are playing in the effort to reshape and transform society’s relationship with the natural world while highlighting the contemporary lives, work and experiences of Native Americans. 
The series is hosted by Bioneers Indigeneity Program Directors Cara Romero (Chemehuevi) and Alexis Bunten (Unangan/Yup’ik), professionally recorded via home studio set-ups, and produced by Bioneers’ award-winning media team. 
We invite you to join the conversation where we’re encouraging everyone to decolonize and re-indigenize their hearts, minds and actions. 

Indigeneity Conversations Bioneers

    • Society & Culture
    • 5.0 • 6 Ratings

Indigeneity Conversations is a podcast series that features deep and engaging conversations with Native culture bearers, scholars, movement leaders, and non-Native allies on the most important issues and solutions in Indian Country. The series also features excerpts from our Indigenous Forum, a sovereign space and touchstone for Native leaders and non-Native allies to come together at our annual Bioneers Conference, and to create and grow strategic alliances.
Indigeneity Conversations explores compelling issues such as Indigenous Land Return, Cultural Appropriation, Rights of Nature and other essential conversations that exemplify the essential leadership role that Indigenous cultures are playing in the effort to reshape and transform society’s relationship with the natural world while highlighting the contemporary lives, work and experiences of Native Americans. 
The series is hosted by Bioneers Indigeneity Program Directors Cara Romero (Chemehuevi) and Alexis Bunten (Unangan/Yup’ik), professionally recorded via home studio set-ups, and produced by Bioneers’ award-winning media team. 
We invite you to join the conversation where we’re encouraging everyone to decolonize and re-indigenize their hearts, minds and actions. 

    “Remembering Who We Are and Our Relations” with Julian Brave NoiseCat

    “Remembering Who We Are and Our Relations” with Julian Brave NoiseCat

    In this episode, we speak with Julian Brave NoiseCat, a proud member of the Canim Lake Band Tsq’escen and a descendant of the Lil’Wat Nation of Mount Currie.
    Julian Brave NoiseCat explores the importance of connection and relationship, to family, to history, to place and to culture, threading his own story throughout a larger narrative about the deep trauma Indigenous people have experienced through colonization and the resilience and power that is emerging as individuals, tribes and nations work to reclaim their own stories and landscapes.
    Julian is a fellow of New America and the Type Media Center, Vice President of Policy & Strategy at Data for Progress as well as one of the first visiting fellows of the Center for Racial Justice at the University of Michigan’s Ford School of Public Policy. In 2021, NoiseCat was named on the Time 100 list of emerging leaders.
    We begin with Julian’s keynote address at the Bioneers 2020 conference and follow with a heartfelt conversation hosted by Cara Romero.

    A prolific, widely published Indigenous journalist, writer, activist and policy analyst, Julian Brave NoiseCat has become a highly influential figure in the coverage and analysis of Environmental Justice and Indigenous issues as well as of national and global political and economic trends and policies. You can follow Julian on Twitter @jnoisecat.
    This episode's artwork features photography by Dauwila Harrison and collage art by Mer Young.
    Resources
    Video of Julian Brave NoiseCat – Apocalypse Then & Now 
    Video of Indigenous Activism NOW: Talking Story With Clayton Thomas-Muller and Julian NoiseCat 
    Video of The Indigenous Renaissance | Julian Brave Noisecat 
    This is an episode of Indigeneity Conversations, a podcast series that features deep and engaging conversations with Native culture bearers, scholars, movement leaders, and non-Native allies on the most important issues and solutions in Indian Country. Bringing Indigenous voices to global conversations. Visit the Indigeneity Conversations homepage to learn more.

    • 49 min
    Returning to What Was Lost and Stolen with Corrina Gould

    Returning to What Was Lost and Stolen with Corrina Gould

    Defending land rights and preserving tribal culture is difficult for North American tribes, especially for those that do not have sovereign nation-to-nation status with the federal government. The lack of recognition of a tribe’s nationhood as a self-governing entity (as defined by the U.S. Constitution) has been explicitly used as a tool to continue to prevent Native peoples from living on the most desirable lands or protecting sacred lands that have been stolen. 
    We talk about these issues with Corrina Gould, a celebrated leader and activist of the First Peoples of the Bay Area from the Lisjan/Ohlone tribe of Northern California. She also co-founded the grassroots organization “Indian People Organizing for Change”, which works to defend and preserve sacred Ohlone shell mounds formed over generations.
    This episodes's artwork features photography by Toby McLeod and collage art by Mer Young.
    Corrina Gould (Lisjan/Ohlone) is the chair and spokesperson for the Confederated Villages of Lisjan, as well as the Co-Director for The Sogorea Te’ Land Trust, a women-led organization within the urban setting of her ancestral territory of the Bay Area that works to return Indigenous land to Indigenous people. Born and raised in her ancestral homeland, the territory of Huchiun, she is the mother of three and grandmother of four. Corrina has worked on preserving and protecting the sacred burial sites of her ancestors throughout the Bay Area for decades.

    • 26 min
    California Genocide and Resilience with Corrina Gould

    California Genocide and Resilience with Corrina Gould

    California Indians have survived some of the most extreme acts of genocide committed against Native Americans. Prior to the ongoing genocide under Spanish and American colonizations, California Indians were the most linguistically diverse and population dense First Peoples in the United States. We discuss this brutal history and survivance with Corrina Gould, Co-Founder and Co-Director of the Sogorea Te’ Land Trust. She is from the Lisjan/Ohlone tribe of Northern California. We talk about the importance of addressing that historical trauma, which caused deep wounds that still affect Indigenous Peoples today.  
    ***Content warning: Some of the material in this podcast may be triggering, especially for those that have experienced trauma and/or intergenerational trauma due to colonialism.
    Corrina Gould (Lisjan/Ohlone) is the chair and spokesperson for the Confederated Villages of Lisjan, as well as the Co-Director for The Sogorea Te’ Land Trust, a women-led organization within the urban setting of her ancestral territory of the Bay Area that works to return Indigenous land to Indigenous people. Born and raised in her ancestral homeland, the territory of Huchiun, she is the mother of three and grandmother of four. Corrina has worked on preserving and protecting the sacred burial sites of her ancestors throughout the Bay Area for decades.
    This episodes's artwork features photography by Cara Romero and collage art by Mer Young.
    Resources
    California Indian Genocide and Resilience | 2017 Bioneers panel in which four California Indian leaders share the stories of kidnappings, mass murders, and slavery that took place under Spanish, Mexican and American colonizations — and how today’s generation is dealing with the contemporary implications.
    This is an episode of Indigeneity Conversations, a podcast series that features deep and engaging conversations with Native culture bearers, scholars, movement leaders, and non-Native allies on the most important issues and solutions in Indian Country. Bringing Indigenous voices to global conversations. Visit the Indigeneity Conversations homepage to learn more.

    • 27 min
    Indigenize the Law: Tribal Rights of Nature Movements - PT 2 | with Casey Camp-Horinek

    Indigenize the Law: Tribal Rights of Nature Movements - PT 2 | with Casey Camp-Horinek

    This is part two of our conversation with tribal elder and matriarch Casey Camp-Horinek. We discuss why a tribally led movement is the best hope for the planet, and how the unique legal and political relationship between tribes and the U.S. federal government is advantageous in efforts to truly protect ecosystems. Casey also discusses the journey her tribe is taking as they explore the best ways to incorporate rights of nature into their legal framework.
    Casey Camp-Horinek, a tribal Councilwoman of the Ponca Tribe of Oklahoma and Hereditary Drumkeeper of its Womens’ Scalp Dance Society, Elder and Matriarch, is also an Emmy award winning actress, author, and an internationally renowned, longtime Native and Human Rights and Environmental Justice activist. She led efforts for the Ponca tribe to adopt a Rights of Nature Statute and pass a moratorium on fracking on its territory, and has traveled and spoken around the world.
    This episode's artwork includes photography by Will Wilson and collage artwork by Mer Young.
    Resources
    Bioneers’ Indigeneity Program Rights of Nature Initiative
    Rights of Nature Bioneers Media Hub
    Casey Camp-Horinek: Aligning Human Law with Natural Law | 2019 Bioneers Conference Keynote Address
    This is an episode of Indigeneity Conversations, a podcast series that features deep and engaging conversations with Native culture bearers, scholars, movement leaders, and non-Native allies on the most important issues and solutions in Indian Country. Bringing Indigenous voices to global conversations. Visit the Indigeneity Conversations homepage to learn more.

    • 39 min
    Indigenize the Law: Tribal Rights of Nature Movements - PT 1 | Casey Camp-Horinek

    Indigenize the Law: Tribal Rights of Nature Movements - PT 1 | Casey Camp-Horinek

    The idea that a river or other natural feature is a living being, imbued with the right to live and thrive is nothing new to Indigenous Peoples around the world. In this episode with Matriarch Casey Camp-Horinek, we talk about how a burgeoning indigenous-led Rights of Nature movement has the potential to protect ecosystems from destruction by granting legal rights to nature itself, and how many tribes are uniquely positioned for leadership to institute and uphold the Rights of Nature because of their sovereign legal status.
    Casey Camp-Horinek, a tribal Councilwoman of the Ponca Tribe of Oklahoma and Hereditary Drumkeeper of its Womens’ Scalp Dance Society, Elder and Matriarch, is also an Emmy award winning actress, author, and an internationally renowned, longtime Native and Human Rights and Environmental Justice activist. She led efforts for the Ponca tribe to adopt a Rights of Nature Statute and pass a moratorium on fracking on its territory, and has traveled and spoken around the world.
    This episode's artwork is by Mer Young.
    Resources
    Bioneers’ Indigeneity Program Rights of Nature Initiative
    Rights of Nature Bioneers Media Hub
    Casey Camp-Horinek: Aligning Human Law with Natural Law | 2019 Bioneers Conference Keynote Address
    This is an episode of Indigeneity Conversations, a podcast series that features deep and engaging conversations with Native culture bearers, scholars, movement leaders, and non-Native allies on the most important issues and solutions in Indian Country. Bringing Indigenous voices to global conversations. Visit the Indigeneity Conversations homepage to learn more.

    • 34 min
    Transforming Indigenous Stereotypes: Stories By Us For Us with Crystal Echo Hawk

    Transforming Indigenous Stereotypes: Stories By Us For Us with Crystal Echo Hawk

    From racist mascots, to stereotypes in national creation myths like Thanksgiving, we have always faced misrepresentation and disrespect of our cultures and identities. Cultural appropriation and commodification of our cultures is commonplace, but Native activists, artists, youth, educators, legislators and our allies are changing that reality. We are winning battles to ban racist mascots and call out negative stereotypes in the media.
    This episode features Crystal Echo Hawk, an enrolled member of the Pawnee Nation of Oklahoma and the founder and Executive Director of IllumiNative, the first and only national Native-led organization focused on changing the narrative about Native peoples on a mass scale. Crystal built IllumiNative to activate a cohesive set of research-informed strategies that illuminate the voices, stories, contributions and assets of contemporary Native peoples to disrupt the invisibility and toxic stereotypes Native peoples face.
    This episode's artwork includes photography by Cara Romero and collage artwork by Mer Young.
    This is an episode of Indigeneity Conversations, a podcast series that features deep and engaging conversations with Native culture bearers, scholars, movement leaders, and non-Native allies on the most important issues and solutions in Indian Country. Bringing Indigenous voices to global conversations. Visit the Indigeneity Conversations homepage to learn more.

    • 30 min

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