41 episodes

Intersectionality Matters! is a podcast hosted by Kimberlé Crenshaw, an American civil rights advocate and a leading scholar of critical race theory.

Intersectionality Matters‪!‬ African American Policy Forum

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    • 4.7 • 625 Ratings

Intersectionality Matters! is a podcast hosted by Kimberlé Crenshaw, an American civil rights advocate and a leading scholar of critical race theory.

    40. The Lies They Tell: Mass Media's Complicity in the Age of Disinformation

    40. The Lies They Tell: Mass Media's Complicity in the Age of Disinformation

    Over the last year, the Right has ignited a widespread disinformation campaign around Critical Race Theory -- and mainstream media is fueling the fire. Mentions of CRT in the news grew exponentially this past year, with journalists often framing the conversation around education censorship as an equal debate between supporters and opponents of anti-equality legislation. And despite CRT’s well-documented history of emerging in 1989 with a clear and fixed definition, the media have decided to play in the Right’s disinformation campaign by allowing a distortion of the concept’s meaning in exchange for views.

    On this episode, Kimberlé meets with veteran journalist Soledad O’Brien to unpack mass media’s decision to legitimize faux debate, outline the consequences of this debate on racial justice and democracy, and chart a path forward for journalists who aspire to do better.

    With:
    SOLEDAD O'BRIEN - CEO of Soledad O’Brien Productions; Anchor and Producer, The Hearst Television political magazine program “Matter of Fact with Soledad O’Brien”

    Hosted by Kimberlé Crenshaw (@sandylocks)
    Produced and edited by Julia Sharpe-Levine
    Co-produced by Ashley Julien
    Supported provided by Destiny Spruill, Rebecca Scheckman, and the African American Policy Forum
    Music by Blue Dot Sessions
    Follow us at @intersectionalitymatters, @IMKC_podcast

    • 41 min
    39. The Insurgent Origins of Critical Race Theory

    39. The Insurgent Origins of Critical Race Theory

    Over the past year, Critical Race Theory has been increasingly misrepresented by the Right in an organized, widespread effort to stifle racial justice and gender equity, and weaken our multiracial democracy. In response to these attacks, AAPF held a 5-day Critical Race Theory Summer School in mid-August to educate participants about the origins, principles, and insights of Critical Race Theory, and to chart a path forward.

    On this episode, we bring you a conversation that took place on the first day of Summer School, which features some of the leading thinkers in the field of Critical Race Theory. Together, the panelists tell the story of CRT came to be, explore what it teaches us about the world, and discuss it can now help us protect the very existence of critical thinking about race.

    With:
    ANTHONY COOK - Professor of Law, Georgetown; Author, The Least of These: Race, Law and Religion in American Culture

    DANIEL MARTINEZ HOSANG - Associate Professor of Ethnicity, Race & Migration, Yale; Author, Racial Propositions: Ballot Initiatives

    GLORIA LADSON-BILLINGS - Pedagogical theorist & educator; Author, The Dreamkeepers: Successful Teachers of African American Children

    GARY PELLER - Professor of Law, Georgetown; Author, Critical Race Consciousness

    ROBERT A. WILLIAMS, JR - Professor of Law, University of Arizona; Author, Savage Anxieties: The Invention of Western Civilization

    Hosted by Kimberlé Crenshaw (@sandylocks)
    Produced and edited by Julia Sharpe-Levine
    Supported provided by Destiny Spruill, Ashley Julien, Rebecca Scheckman, and the African American Policy Forum
    Music by Blue Dot Sessions
    Follow us at @intersectionalitymatters, @IMKC_podcast

    • 1 hr 16 min
    38. Engendering the Politics of the Black Athlete

    38. Engendering the Politics of the Black Athlete

    When we think about the history of Black athletic resistance, we don't tend to think of Black women athletes like Wyomia Tyus, Rose Robinson, or Wilma Rudolph, who have all taken great risks to speak out against racial injustice. On this episode, Kimbelé is joined by Layshia Clarendon and Sydney Colson of the WNBA, Demario Davis of the New Orleans Saints, and civil rights icon Dr. Harry Edwards to celebrate the achievements of today’s Black women athletes, reflect on the history of athletic activism, and imagine the power that lies in collective action and athletic solidarity.

    With:
    LAYSHIA CLARENDON - WNBA player, leading advocate for trans, non-binary and LGBTQ+ athletes, and the first vice president of the WNBA Players Association

    SYDNEY COLSON - WNBA player, member of the WNBA’s Social Justice Council, and a leading voice in the WNBA #SayHerName initiative

    DEMARIO DAVIS - Linebacker for the New Orleans Saints, member of the Players Coalition, recipient of the Bart Starr Award for outstanding character on the field, at home, and in the community

    DR. HARRY EDWARDS - Professor emeritus at UC Berkeley, founder of the field of study known as the Sociology of Sports, and founder of the Olympic Project for Human Rights movement

    Special thanks to the Players Coalition (@playerscoalition) for making this event possible

    Hosted by Kimberlé Crenshaw (@sandylocks)

    Produced and edited by Julia Sharpe-Levine
    Supported provided by Amarachi Anakaraonye, Rebecca Scheckman, Destiny Spruill, and the African American Policy Forum

    Music by Blue Dot Sessions

    Follow us at @intersectionalitymatters, @IMKC_podcast

    • 56 min
    37. Black Women's Health Through the Twin Pandemics

    37. Black Women's Health Through the Twin Pandemics

    On today’s episode, Kimberlé and a group of leading champions for equitable healthcare take us behind the “white coat” of medical racism, and explore its disproportionate impact on Black women and girls. Guests share their own stories being mistreated and ignored as patients, and reflect on the struggles they’ve endured as Black woman doctors working in a medical system with roots in eugenics and racialized violence. The conversation analyzes the lessons learned from the tragic case of Dr. Susan Moore, examines how the experiences of Black women in healthcare relate to historical racism and sexism, and asks what it would take to deconstruct the misogynoir that “lurks behind the white coat.”

    With:
    Dr. Karen Scott, epidemiologist, educator and obstetric doctor;
    Dr. Gail Wyatt, professor at UCLA, psychologist, and board certified sex therapist;
    Dr. Alisha Liggett, board certified family medicine doctor with a clinical practice based in New York City;
    Dr. Joia Crear Perry, the founder and president of the National Birth Equity Collaborative.

    Hosted by Kimberlé Crenshaw (@sandylocks)

    Produced and edited by Julia Sharpe-Levine
    This episode was co-produced by Amarachi Anakaraonye
    Supported provided by Rebecca Scheckman, Destiny Spruill, and the African American Policy Forum

    Music by Blue Dot Sessions

    Follow us at @intersectionalitymatters, @IMKC_podcast

    • 1 hr 3 min
    36. A Love Song for Latasha

    36. A Love Song for Latasha

    The murder of 15-year-old Latasha Harlins by Soon Ja Du, a convenience store owner in 1991 became one of the flashpoints for the LA uprisings the following year. Yet while Latasha’s killing happened just 13 days after the Rodney King beating, her story garnered little lasting attention. On this episode of Intersectionality Matters, Kimberlé sits down with Sophia Nahli Allison, director of the Oscar-nominated documentary short “A Love Song for Natasha” (available on Netflix), to discuss the film, Latasha's story, and the role of art in bringing intersectional stories to life.

    This episode includes audio from the following:
    - “LA 92”, a National Geographic documentary
    - “A Love Song for Latasha” (Netflix)
    - AAPF’s 2017 panel discussion on Latasha Harlins at the Hammer Museum, featuring Priscilla Ocen and Brenda Stevenson

    Hosted by Kimberlé Crenshaw (@sandylocks)

    Produced and edited by Julia Sharpe-Levine
    Support provided by Amarachi Anakaraonye, Rebecca Scheckman, Destiny Spruill, and the African American Policy Forum

    Music by Blue Dot Sessions

    Follow us at @intersectionalitymatters, @IMKC_podcast

    • 39 min
    35. The Story Of Us (Part 2)

    35. The Story Of Us (Part 2)

    With Bryan Stevenson, Viet Thanh Nguyen, Ruha Benjamin, and David Blight

    In the second half of a two-part episode on the stories that shape our understanding of America, Kimberlé Crenshaw and special guests explore the ways that film and other technologies have reproduced and popularized these dominant stories. The episode examines Hollywood’s role in writing and rewriting history, and asks how we can begin writing new stories that tell the full story of us.

    With:

    RUHA BENJAMIN- Professor of American Studies, Princeton University; Author, Race After Technology
    DAVID BLIGHT - Professor of American History, Yale University; Author, Frederick Douglass: Prophet of Freedom
    BRYAN STEVENSON - Founder and Executive Director, Equal Justice Initiative; Author, Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption
    VIET THANH NGUYEN- Professor of American Studies and Comparative Literature, University of Southern California; Author, The Sympathizer

    Hosted by Kimberlé Crenshaw (@sandylocks)

    Produced and edited by Julia Sharpe-Levine
    Support provided by Amarachi Anakaraonye, Rebecca Scheckman, Destiny Spruill, and the African American Policy Forum

    Music by Blue Dot Sessions

    Follow us at @intersectionalitymatters, @IMKC_podcast

    • 43 min

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5
625 Ratings

625 Ratings

AME member ,

Interview with Soledad. Media disinformation

Insightful episode thank you.

HareYoh ,

Enlightening

I learn something new from this podcast each time I tune in. Kimberly and guests are incredibly knowledgeable and a delight to listen to. I am privileged to have access to this podcast and space to listen to experiences and the struggle of black women in our world today

Peopleingear ,

Eye opening and enriching in a most in-depth and profound deliverance

Topics are rich with exposure of stories I have never known or heard about . Kimberley has introduce me to many stories that cover black women and the stark realities that have been hidden . She brings these stories to surface and I am grateful to know and be aware of them . Thank you !

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