30 episodes

KnolShare is a community focused on provided learning in multiple business disciplines that include innovation, technology, agility, software development, and much more.

KnolShare with Dr. Dav‪e‬ KnolShare with Dr. Dave

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KnolShare is a community focused on provided learning in multiple business disciplines that include innovation, technology, agility, software development, and much more.

    E83: Proceedings from the Agile for Humanity 2021 Future Search Event

    E83: Proceedings from the Agile for Humanity 2021 Future Search Event

    Future Search conversations included:



    * Facilitating compassionate conversations

    * Collaborate with our brothers and sisters in Africa and bring Agility to Africa

    * A framework focused on coaching the whole person

    * Reflect BIPOC, a representation in Agile conferences



     

    • 43 min
    EAFH38: Dr. Charles Collingwood — Make Learning More Real World

    EAFH38: Dr. Charles Collingwood — Make Learning More Real World

    Dr. Dave:                      Hello. And welcome to the KnolShare with Dr. Dave podcast. I am Dr. Dave Cornelius, your host. Today, my discussion partner is Dr. Charles Collingwood, the Math Department Chair at Sahuaro High School in Tucson, Arizona. He is a pioneering STEM educator who influenced many high school students to go on to college. We have had many great conversations over the years about transforming education to include more real world practices and applications. Well, let's begin. Dr. Charles Collingwood, thank you for joining me today. How are you doing?

    Dr. Charles Col...:          I'm doing great, man. Thank you.

    Dr. Dave:                      That's just great, man. So I'm just going to jump right in and start peppering you with questions right off the bat.

    Dr. Charles Col...:          Lay it on me, lay it on me.

    Dr. Dave:                      Lay it on you. There you go. So look, as a teacher, what are some of the guiding principles that you want to share with your students that would really affect their ability to learn?

    Dr. Charles Col...:          I think the first thing that students have to understand that learning itself is a life-long commitment, right? As human beings, to live in society, we have to learn how to function. So the process of learning, we talk about it a lot in schools, but basically, the process of learning happens throughout our life and we've got to apply that to this special context of schooling and I think that's important for students to understand because I like to have them understand that you have learned many things in your lifespan. They could talk about some of them play music, some of them play sports, they play all these things and they have to learn them at some point. So this process of learning, we talk about it in the context of schooling, but in fact, it happens throughout your whole life. I think once they understand that, then it's much easier for me to teach them these concepts that they are not really familiar with.

    Dr. Dave:                      Okay. So it's learning throughout in our lives and in many different contexts. So I want to talk about this mentoring program that you started at Sahuaro High School in 2020 in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic. What were some of the goals for the mentoring program that you had?

    Dr. Charles Col...:          One of the issues that we have at the school that I'm working at is that you have quite a few students that are not really engaged in the curriculum that is being offered in many areas, right? So as I was having meetings over the summer and during the COVID spring, we started to talk about, man, how can we engage students more? What kind of ways can we do to engage students. And then I thought about it would be awesome if I could have a class where we are not really talking about any specific content, but the idea of learning, right, teaching yourself to learn, what it means to learn.

    So they gave me the green light to cover the class. And I said, "Okay. I think I could do that." So I came up with this thing called mentoring class, right? A mentoring class where I had about 24 or 25 students in the class and about maybe 10 of them are what I call mentors, maybe usually juniors and seniors and then the rest of them were freshmen and sophomore students who I thought needed help.

    So the idea was to introduce students probably for the first time into a learning environment without the pressure of a grade so to speak, right? So we are here to learn. There is no pressure. What I did is I got many community members to come in and speak with the students and stuff like that. And students were able to interac

    • 32 min
    EAFH36: Ewan O’Leary — Social Justice South Africa and United States Experiences

    EAFH36: Ewan O’Leary — Social Justice South Africa and United States Experiences

    Dr. Dave:                      Hello, and welcome to the KnolShare with Dr. Dave Podcast, I am Dr. Dave Cornelius, your host. You know, I first met Ewan at a coaching retreat in Seattle, Washington. We were in the same cohort, seeking to discover a hypothesis for a future solution in the coaching space. We had a few contentious moments, but settled our differences over a few beers and I introduced him to my family, my wife and my son, who were traveling with me at the conference, so, let's begin to learn about Ewan's journey during this period of social justice conflicts.

    So, Ewan, it's so good to see you, one of the things, let's introduce who you are, let the world know who Ewan O'Leary is. I hope I didn't screw your name up too badly.

    Ewan O'Leary:               Yeah, no, you're perfect, you're perfect. So, here's the thing, right, I have my father to thank for the fact that my name is Ewan Gareth O'Leary, and if you kind of look at the capital letters there it forms ego.

    Dr. Dave:                      I just saw that, that's crazy.

    Ewan O'Leary:               So, I guess I'm sort of carrying a few things around, maybe a chip on my shoulder or two, or 17, I don't know. But I grew up in South Africa, I left South Africa in 2000 and moved to the United States, and I feel a tremendous sense of privilege at being able to do that. You know, South Africa is a country with its own amazingly and painfully beautiful history, in so many different ways and for so many different people. For some folks, the beauty isn't there, it's just mostly pain. I try to sort of find a silver lining in every cloud, but I find that, obviously, with the privilege that I bring into any situation.

    So, I've been coaching as an agile coach, technically since, and I say technically, since 2008, that was the first time I spun up a scrum team to solve some problems in an organization. But I've been in software development since I was eight and I persuaded my dad to trade his HP 12c in for a Commodore 64.

    Dr. Dave:                      Yeah.

    Ewan O'Leary:               Which was a great platform, a lot of fun, and it sort of gave me the sense of confidence that I could solve any problem, I could deal with any situation in technology. Of course, I'm not in technology now, I'm in coaching, and I've been in coaching for, I don't know, 12 or 13 years. Right now, I'm working with a large pharma organization helping with late stage drug trials, doesn't sound like technology at all, but one of the things that I've read along the way is this idea that management is the technology of human accomplishment.

    And agile management, agile leadership, and in fact, agile process, agile values, principles, just lump that all together for the moment, we can argue about the nuances later, I'm sure we will. If you bring all those things together, you have human accomplishment, and that's led me to my reason for doing what I do, which is to liberate human potential. I coach to liberate human potential. And I leave pauses like I just left for you, there's a little mine field.

    Dr. Dave:                      I love it.

    Ewan O'Leary:               Let's go for it, man.

    Dr. Dave:                      I love it. So, let's talk about the social justice conflicts in the US and around the world, you know? How is that affecting you, you know, in here? How does that make you feel my brother?

    Ewan O'Leary:               I, first off, thank you for acknowledging me as your brother, that is an enormous, enormous... I feel so much respect for that. We have some problems which may seem intractable right now, and I know that

    • 32 min
    EAFH35: Tracy and Sabrina Shares Social Justice Experiences in an Interracial Family

    EAFH35: Tracy and Sabrina Shares Social Justice Experiences in an Interracial Family

    EAFH35: Tracy and Sabrina Shares Social Justice Experiences in an Interracial Family













































    Dr. Dave:

    Tracy Trace and her daughter Sabrina. Welcome to the KnolShare with Dr. Dave podcast. How are you guys doing today?

    Tracy:

    You go first Bri.

    Dr. Dave:

    She's like ...

    Sabrina:

    I'm good. How are you all?

    Dr. Dave:

    You good? We're amazing. We're amazing. How about you, Tray, what's going on with you?

    Tracy:

    I'm doing all right.

    Dr. Dave:

    All right. I'm happy to hear that. How's my friend, Steve? My bro-in-law.

    Tracy:

    Oh, he's fine.

    Dr. Dave:

    I just want to let you know that I have a bromance with your dad, so it's just a thing. So let's just start, and perhaps you guys could do an elevator pitch to introduce yourselves. I know lots about you, but I'd rather let the audience hear it in your own voice.

    Tracy:

    I am Tracy Treacy and I have known Dr. Dave for a long time.

    Dr. Dave:

    Good, good.

    Tracy:

    I have no idea how long. All of my adulthood I have known Dr. Dave, how's that?

    Dr. Dave:

    That's true.

    Tracy:

    Yes.

    Dr. Dave:

    Yes.

    Tracy:

    All of my adulthood. And for profession, I am a psychotherapist.

    Dr. Dave:

    Okay.

    Tracy:

    And for my identity, I am a mom and I enjoy being a mom. And I, I call myself a, I don't know, self-care guru, something like that, holistic healer. Been doing it for about 20 some years. And I enjoy what I do, work does not feel like work, so I'm never dreading doing what I'm doing. It always feels like I'm walking in my light and in where I'm supposed to be and life is good.

    Dr. Dave:

    Good. So Sabrina, can I get an elevator pitch from you?

    Sabrina:

    So, I'm Sabrina. I guess if my mom introduces herself as a mother, I'm a daughter. I live in Brooklyn and I first and foremost am a nerd. It dictates the way that I approach my work and my personal life. I just want to get to know everything about everything all the time, but specifically as it relates to slavery and race. And so, right now, I work for a digital media lab called Accelerate Change and we support digital organizers across the country in a new organizing fashion called blended organizing, which we will start building January 1st. And our support for organizers basically turned out marginal votes for the November 3rd general election. And so, now we're working really hard to get it together for the Georgia runoff. So that's what I do in my day job, without the day job I would just be reading and writing about slavery.

    Dr. Dave:

    Man, I am so glad I'm getting to know you, I really am. Hey, so it's really awesome that mom and daughter living in a mixed family. So how has that shaped your thinking and experiences with social justice?

    Tracy:

    Hm. Why don't you take that one Sabrina?

    Sabrina:

    Well, I mean we were just talking about this.

    Tracy:

    We were.

    Sabrina:

    What was that two hours ago? Literally it was a mistake, but serendipitous, I guess at this point. I woke up this morning thinking about how oftentimes growing up, I would see my mom's race getting called into question. And it was really strange for me because I always thought that she was excited about it, that's the way I perceived it as a young individual. And then on top of the constant questioning that I was going through, so people would be like, "What are you?" Every day of my life since K5. And no one can make sense of my race, but I knew that I was Black, I knew that I was a Black girl, but I didn't know that these questions were traumatizing,

    • 48 min
    EAFH-34: Michael Spayd Talks Systemic Consciousness and Systemic Racism

    EAFH-34: Michael Spayd Talks Systemic Consciousness and Systemic Racism

    EAFH34: Michael Spayd talks Systemic Consciousness and Systemic Racism













































    Dr. Dave:

    So, welcome to the KnolShare with Dr. Dave Podcast, Michael. I'm just so excited to have you today for our conversation about The Social Justice Center's impact, especially in the Agile community.

    Michael Spayd:

    Thank you for having me, Dave.

    Dr. Dave:

    Yeah, I'm just really glad that you were able to connect. So let's just kick off and begin by you doing a quick elevator pitch about who is Michael Spayd and make sure our audience knows who you are and the good work that you're doing, if there is good work. Just kidding.

    Michael Spayd:

    I hope so.

    Dr. Dave:

    Yeah.

    Michael Spayd:

    Well, I've been in the Agile World about 20 years actually and have done a lot of large-scale transformations and started the Agile Coaching Institute with Lyssa Adkins in 2010. And more recently started a company called The Collective Edge with Lyssa and Michael Hamman and Kat Conner. And the time I've spent in the Agile community has been around bringing disciplines, methodologies, techniques in from other disciplines outside of technical ones or Agile software development like facilitation, professional coaching, organizational change and culture, leadership development, things that are really important that are needed in the Agile community but that the Agile community doesn't necessarily know a whole lot about or is not native to them. And I just finished a book with Michele Madore called Agile Transformation: Using the Integral Agile Transformation Framework To Think And Lead Differently. And that's about a big picture view of how transformations go and when we can expect them to happen and when we can't.

    Dr. Dave:

    Excellent.

    Michael Spayd:

    And that's a little about me.

    Dr. Dave:

    That's wonderful. So let's talk about the emotions that systemic racism bring to the surface for you, and really how do you deal with those feelings? Because those are heavy things for people like myself, but what of for you?

    Michael Spayd:

    Yeah, sure.

    Dr. Dave:

    What is that experience and the emotion that comes with that?

    Michael Spayd:

    Well, so I would say that before this year of 2020, my awareness of systemic racism was fleeting, to be honest. It was in patches or in moments and not sustained more as it is now. As I've been reflecting on just the killings this year, the clear record of police violence and oppression and how that extends into all kinds of other places, has really sobered me about that and made me... There's some guilt for me. I wasn't paying attention to this in a way that I wish I would've before. So there's some regret that way. And there's also just some deep compassion.

    I remember going to... I live in Richmond, Virginia right now, and going down Monument Avenue where there's all these Confederate monuments and seeing the Robert E. Lee one, which has been taken over by Black Lives Matter and all these pictures on little stakes of black people that have been killed. And just feeling into that in a much deeper way than I have before. And just seeing the pattern and the picture and just raising my empathy for what that's like. It's sort of horrifying to me. So just trying to increase my awareness of systemic racism, the racism in me.

    Dr. Dave:

    Yeah. So do you sense there are challenges with social justice in the Agile community and where there is little empathy for black, indigenous and people of color lives in this space?

    Michael Spayd:

    Sure, in the same way that it is in most of our society.

    • 27 min
    E79: Finding Your Engagement Sweet Spot During COVID-19

    E79: Finding Your Engagement Sweet Spot During COVID-19

    E79: Finding Your Engagement Sweet Spot During COVID-19



























    By: Dr. Dave Cornelius

    Finding your engagement sweet spot in this turbulent, uncertain, novel, and ambiguous (TUNA) environment is ”wicked-hard”.  I have inserted the Bostonian ”wicked-hard” colloquialism as I reflect on a previous weekly commute from the West to the East Coast for a customer engagement.  People in the office would often use ”wicked-hard” to describe some of the technological and people collaboration challenges.  I view people engagement in two categories that include 1) social engagement and 2) execution engagement.  It is estimated that the lack of engagement cost organizations approximately $550B in productivity loss each year.  That is a lot of productivity loss.

    One question that I pose to agile, business, and executive coaches is what people and teams are missing because they are remote.  Recently, I spoke with a few agile coaches and they agree that social (casual) conversation is a key experience that is limited.  The ability to walk over to your colleague for a casual talk about sports, the kids, politics (no, not that!), and advice is now harder than ever.  A few of the experiences shared by the coaches to compensate for our distance were 1) teams are leaving open Slack channels to signal impromptu virtual meetups, 2) book clubs, and 3) virtual social events for happy hour and parties.  I would invite us to also practice the core protocol of “freedom” and allow our team members to “Check out” without judgement, explanation, or drama.  Each individual should be able to say , “I’m checking out”.  The benefit of creating social engagement while we are virtual will continue to help us build community and develop beneficial cultural experiences.

    Beyond the social interaction between team members, we should not lose sight of the execution engagement that produces value for the organization.  In my coaching practice, I use a qualitative survey to help team members understand the level of engagement by probing the following:



    * Understands the customer requests

    * Takes initiative to lead without being asked

    * Recommends solutions to problems and provide innovative ideas

    * Contributes to technical and other conversations

    * Meets Say – Do (Stories planned vs Stories done)

    * Supports Dependent Team(s)



     

    We apply the 360-feedback model that help team members use a blind selection practice to randomly provide feedback to each other.  Team members receive confidential and anonymous feedback from peers and others on cross functional teams who may also contribute.  The survey responses are measured using the following value ranges:



    * 80%-100% - support the team’s focus to excel

    * 60%-79% - monitor the patterns observed, influence to grow

    * 59% and below – seek to understand and coach toward improvement



    This model helps to build trust between the team members.  The frequency of this event usually take place every two or three months.  High-performing people contribute to high-performing teams and the work of leaders will be to create transparent methods that influence aspiration and engagement in this global pandemic.

    Learn more by visiting www.knolshare.org

    Music by: Kayanna Brow-Hendrikson

    Copyright 2020 KnolShare and Dr. Dave Cornelius

    Until next time, Be well, stay safe, and connect soon.

    • 4 min

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