24 episodes

A podcast made to help writers find the best literary agent for their writing and business career.

Lit Match Abigail K. Perry

    • Arts
    • 5.0 • 18 Ratings

A podcast made to help writers find the best literary agent for their writing and business career.

    How to Write a Query Letter (Part 3): Paragraph Three, the Author Bio (and Final Tips)

    How to Write a Query Letter (Part 3): Paragraph Three, the Author Bio (and Final Tips)

    This is the third episode in a three-part series of episodes on how to write a query letter. Abigail teaches writers how to write the third (and final!) paragraph of the query letter, or the author bio. 

    Sometimes writers overthink the author bio, putting undue stress on themselves and this paragraph. This episode covers some tips on how to write this paragraph, som including:


    The Dos and Don’ts of the Author Bio (great tips especially pulled from Kelly Simmons blog on Career Authors!) 
    Do you need to include social media numbers?
    What to write if you don’t have a lot of details to put in bio

    Plus, Abigail shares one of her favorite tricks from Kelly Simmons’ article: Why a P.S. can create one final, special connection to the queried agent! 

     

    If you enjoyed this episode, don’t miss out on the other two episodes in the three-part series:


    Paragraph One: the Hook
    Paragraph Two: the Book (Blurb or Back Cover)

     

    And don’t forget to check out Kelly Simmons’ article on Career Authors:


    How to Write a Query Letter

    • 21 min
    How to Write a Query Letter (Part 2): Paragraph Two, the Blurb (or Back Cover Copy)

    How to Write a Query Letter (Part 2): Paragraph Two, the Blurb (or Back Cover Copy)

    This is the second episode in a three-part series of episodes on how to write a query letter. In it, Abigail teaches writers how to write the second paragraph of the query letter, otherwise known as the blurb or back cover copy. 

    The back cover copy is the most important section in a query letter. Abigail shares important details writers need to make it stand out, some including:

     

    3 Key Details Needed in Every Back Cover Copy:


    Character: Who is the main character? What do they want? What makes them ironic or the least likely hero for the story?
    Central/Main Plot: What is the main plotline? How does the character’s choices impact the plot and vice versa? How can you whittle this down so it’s concise and catchy?
    Hook: What makes your story different from others in the same genre? 

    ***Jessica Faust and James McGowan list and describe these in their awesome Bookends Youtube video. Check out their channel for more amazing writing tips and advice on all things publishing***

     

    James Scott Bell’s 3-Sentence Method to Write a Back Cover:


    Name the main character, their vocation, and their situation when the story opens (also include what they want).
    But + “when this happens”: Think of the inciting incident of your story, what throws your character’s norm off course.
    Now + “death stakes”: What are the main stakes in your novel—physical, psychological, or professional? How are they spotlighted in your back cover, and why will they be raised as the story moves towards its climax?    

     

    The Secret: Great to include in your back cover!

     

    Example: Abigail analyzes some back cover copy examples to model how a strong back cover includes the details and strategies discussed in this episode. 

     

    Additional Resources:


    Revision and Self-Editing for Publication (Jame Scott Bell)
    Query Letter Blurb (Bookends YouTube Channel) 
    The Five People You Meet in Heaven (Mitch Albom)

    • 39 min
    How to Write a Query Letter (Part 1): Paragraph One, the Hook

    How to Write a Query Letter (Part 1): Paragraph One, the Hook

    In the first episode of a three-part series of episodes on how to write a query letter, Abigail teaches writers how to write the first paragraph of their query letter. To do this, she covers important elements like:


    What a query letter is and why a writer who wants to traditionally publish needs one
    4 essential details in every first paragraph 
    4-5 factors that determine a strong comp (comparable title)
    More!

    Plus! Abigail offers a free critique of the first paragraph to the first 10 writers only. Details on how to submit to Abigail and other examples and resources in this episode below:

     

    I WANT A CHANCE AT ABIGAIL’S FREE CRITIQUE! Here’s what to do:


    Email Abigail at: abigailkperry@gmail.com 
    Subject Title: Quick Query Tips Paragraph One
    Embed the first paragraph ONLY in the email
    Not required, but if you want to follow Abigail or share the show, go for it! 

    ***If you are not one of the first ten writers to email Abigail in the requested format, you may not get a response.*** 

     

    FIRST PARAGRAPH EXAMPLE

    Dear AGENT’S NAME,

    I saw on Twitter that you love [SOMETHING THEY’VE SHARED PUBLICLY] and think you’d enjoy my book [YOUR BOOK IN ALL CAPS]. It is a [WORD COUNT and GENRE] that [SHORT LOGLINE] [OR] would entertain readers of [TWO COMPS THAT SHOW YOU UNDERSTAND YOUR GENRE AND ARE SOMETHING THE AGENT WOULD REPRESENT + BE ABLE TO SELL]. 

     

    Additional Resources:


    Carly Watters: Ways to start your query letter

    • 20 min
    First Chapters: Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban

    First Chapters: Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban

    We're back with book three!

    Abigail sits down with certified editor and book coach Savannah Gilbo to discuss and analyze the first chapter of HARRY POTTER AND THE PRISONER OF AZKABAN.

    Following the normal first chapter analysis format, Abigail and Savannah discuss how the first chapter in POA sets up expectations for the big picture story using Paula Munier's seven key first chapter questions (THE WRITER'S GUIDE TO BEGINNINGS). They take a special look at how Harry's balance of internal feelings and how he interacts with his surroundings excite readers despite the lack of action. 

    Abigail and Savannah then zero-in on the small picture and break down the first chapter of POA with the five commandments (Story Grid). They also nerd out about their love for JKR's mastery of red herrings and set ups that continually awe and surprise the reader, even if it's their umpteenth time reading it.

    What do you think makes up the first scene in POA? If you don't remember it, feel free to read the first chapter of POA—and then join us for this lively conversation. 

     P.S. Don't miss out on Savannah's amazing podcast for writers: FICTION WRITING MADE EASY

     

    Connect with us:

    Twitter: @abigailkperry @savannahgilbo

    Instagram: @abigailkperry | @savannah.gilbo

    Website: www.abigailkperry.com  | https://www.savannahgilbo.com/

    • 53 min
    Quick Query Tips: 3 Strategic Ways to Research Literary Agents

    Quick Query Tips: 3 Strategic Ways to Research Literary Agents

    Welcome to the first Quick Query Tips episode!

    While Abigail books more literary agents and editors for the show, she turns the focus from interviews with literary agents to the research and submission process. 

    In this episode, Abigail shares three of her favorite and strategic ways to research literary agents. This is a very hands-on episode as Abigail shares how she researches literary agents, editors, and authors for the show.

    Although the spreadsheet she uses is slightly different than what she recommends a writer use (see her episode with Tee Moore for more details on the ideal spreadsheet for the research process), the strategies are the same. To demonstrate, Abigail uses the three strategies to find literary agents she wants to email *live*—and pushes writers to question why a literary agent would be a good fit for their querying book and writing and publishing career. 

    You can find the links for some off the three recommended strategies here:


    Publisher's Marketplace
    Acknowledgments section in the back of a book
    Three Great Websites

    www.querytracker.net 
    www.mswishlist.com 
    www.manuscriptwishilst.com 



     

    • 31 min
    First Chapters: Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets

    First Chapters: Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets

    We're back! 

    Abigail sits down with Savannah Gilbo to discuss and analyze the first chapter of HARRY POTTER AND THE CHAMBER OF SECRETS.

    This is an especially interesting conversation on first chapters since the first chapter of HPCOS is also the first chapter in the sequel to middle grade fantasy phenomenon, HARRY POTTER AND THE SORCERER'S STONE.

    In it, they discuss the big picture for HPCOS using Paula Munier's seven key questions to analyze a first chapter—shortly followed by a debate: Does the the story event in the first chapter of COS work as a scene or a beat? And if it's a beat, does it take two chapters to cover the first scene in HPCOS?

    This episode is a testament to why discussions about how a story (and a first chapter!) works are so important—by sharing our different perspectives, we continue to grow as writers, editors, publishers, literary agents, and storytellers. 

    What do you think makes up the first scene in HPCOS? If you don't remember, feel free to read the first two chapters of HPCOS, and then join us in this lively conversation.  

     

    P.S. Don't miss out on Savannah's amazing podcast for writers: FICTION WRITING MADE EASY

    Savannah provides a wealth of knowledge and practical tips on writing every week. 

    LISTEN HERE: https://www.savannahgilbo.com/podcast

     

    Connect with us:

    Twitter: @abigailkperry @savannahgilbo

    Instagram: @abigailkperry | @savannah.gilbo

    Website: www.abigailkperry.com  | https://www.savannahgilbo.com/

    • 55 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
18 Ratings

18 Ratings

WaddleIRead ,

Great Writers’ Resource

Both the agent interviews and the analysis of first pages are very helpful for writers in the revision and querying processes. Highly recommend!

Susan - ofeverymoment ,

I’m so glad I stumbled on this podcast!

I’ve binged on all the episodes so far! Having begun editing the first draft of my Women’s Fiction novel, Abigail’s information on first chapters and scene analysis is timely and helpful. Her literary agent interviews are enlightening and making the query process feel less intimidating. I wish I could remember who to thank for leading me here. ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

Marianne Richmond ,

Helpful!

I’ve been a published author for 25+ years and still find so much mystery around the “how to find an agent” question. Abby is the perfect guide to helping authors with information that will help them succeed in telling their stories!

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