9 episodes

Welcome to Liturgical Libations and Lamentations. Here at Libations and Lamentations, we believe that all people are theologians whether they like it or not. As such, we hope this resource will help to refine and shape the theology of the church (particularly laymen and women) toward a more orthodox and articulate expression.

Liturgical Libations and Lamentations Libations and Lamentations

    • Christianity
    • 5.0 • 5 Ratings

Welcome to Liturgical Libations and Lamentations. Here at Libations and Lamentations, we believe that all people are theologians whether they like it or not. As such, we hope this resource will help to refine and shape the theology of the church (particularly laymen and women) toward a more orthodox and articulate expression.

    B3: Sanctity of Life

    B3: Sanctity of Life

    Bonus 3: Sanctity of Life.

    Question 314. How should Christians understand the value of life?

    All life belongs to God. Human life is especially sacred because we are created in God’s image, and because Jesus came to give us new and abundant life in him. Christians, therefore, should act with reverence toward all living things, and with special regard for the sanctity of human life. (Genesis 1:26–27; 2:5–8; Psalm 104:24–30; Matthew 6:26; John 10:10; Acts 17:24–29; Colossians 1:15–20)

    Question 309. Why does God prohibit murder?

    Because every human being is made in God’s image, all human life is sacred, from conception to natural death. Therefore, I may not take the life of others unjustly. (Genesis 9:6; Deuteronomy 19:4–13; Psalm 94:1–7; Isaiah 46:3–4; Romans 12:19–21)

    Anglicans For Life: https://anglicansforlife.org/

    March For Life: https://marchforlife.org/

    New Catechism: http://www.anglicanchurch.net/?/main/catechism

    • 24 min
    S1E5: To Be a Christian; Part 2.4 - The Sacraments

    S1E5: To Be a Christian; Part 2.4 - The Sacraments

    To Be a Christian: An Anglican Catechism

    Part II + Believing in Christ

    The Sacraments

    Question 102: What is a sacrament?

    "A sacrament is an outward and visible sign of an inward and spiritual grace. God gives us the sign as a means whereby we receive that grace, and as a tangible assurance that we do in fact receive it."  - To Be a Christian, pg. 30

    —-—

    Bishop Edmund Guest of Rochester

    “ … this word ‘only’ in the aforesaid article did not exclude the presence of Christ’s body from the Sacrament, but only the grossness and sensibleness in the receiving thereof.  For I said unto him though he took Christ’s body in his hand, received it with his mouth, and that corporally, naturally, really, substantially, and carnally, as the doctors do write, yet did he not for all that see it, feel it, smell it, nor taste it.  And therefore I told him I would speak against him therein, and the rather because the article was of mine own penning.  And yet I would not for all that deny anything that I had spoken for the presence.  And this was the sum of our talk. And this that I said is so true by all sorts of men that even D. Harding [Catholic writer who was Jewel’s antagonist] writeth the same, as it appears more evidently by his words reported in the Bishop of Salisbury’s [i.e. John Jewell] book, pagina 325, which be these, ‘Then ye may say, in deed; substantially, that is, in substance; and corporally, carnally, and naturally; by the which words is meant that His very body, His very flesh, and His human nature is there, not after corporal, carnal, or natural wise, but invisibly, unspeakably, supernaturally, spiritually, divinely, and by way unto Him only known’.”  (Letter of Guest, 1566, in Stone, 1909: II, 210-211).

    • 54 min
    S1E4: To Be a Christian; Part 2.3 - Believing in Christ (Ecclesiastical Articles of the Apostles’ Creed)

    S1E4: To Be a Christian; Part 2.3 - Believing in Christ (Ecclesiastical Articles of the Apostles’ Creed)

    To Be a Christian: An Anglican Catechism

    Part II + Believing in Christ

    The Apostles Creed and the Church

    “The [Apostles] Creed exists, as all Creeds and Confessions do, to define and defend this commitment that is basic to being a Christian... As a whole, the Creed testifies to the vital core of God’s self-revelation. It is a consensus document, coming to us with the resounding endorsement of faithful believers over nearly two thousand years, for it has been recited by Christian communities at all times and in all places throughout the history of the Christian Church. And it is a benchmark of orthodoxy, that is, of right belief, guiding our understanding of God’s revealed truth at points where our sin-clouded minds might go astray.” - To Be a Christian, pg. 15-6

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    Notes on the conversation regarding the communion and intercession of the saints:

    http://northamanglican.com/a-reformed-litany-of-the-saints-for-all-saints-day/

    http://northamanglican.com/a-reformed-litany-of-the-saints-an-anglo-catholic-speculative-rebuttal/

    https://www.earthaltar.org/post/ora-pro-nobis-a-response-to-rev-ben-jefferies-reformed-litany-of-the-saints

    http://northamanglican.com/concerning-the-saints/

    https://www.earthaltar.org/post/ora-pro-nobis-pt-2-a-defense-from-scripture-and-tradition

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    Note on the reference to the Amazon Synod of the Roman Catholic Church: The statue of “Pachamama” which was displayed in an idolatrous manner within the Vatican was never intended to represent the Blessed Virgin Mary as was incorrectly stated on the Podcast; rather it represented a South American fertility goddess which we believe should definitely not (ecumenical or otherwise) have been displayed within a sacred Church.

    • 49 min
    S1E3: To Be a Christian; Part 2.2 - Believing in Christ (Trinitarian Articles)

    S1E3: To Be a Christian; Part 2.2 - Believing in Christ (Trinitarian Articles)

    To Be a Christian: An Anglican Catechism

    Part II + Believing in Christ

    The Apostles Creed and the Holy Trinity

    “The [Apostles] Creed exists, as all Creeds and Confessions do, to define and defend this commitment that is basic to being a Christian. Its central article—which declares who and what Jesus Christ was, is and will be—is the fullest and longest; the article on God the Creator (the Father) introduces it, and the article on the Holy Spirit and the Christian salvation follows from it. As a whole, the Creed testifies to the vital core of God’s self-revelation. It is a consensus document, coming to us with the resounding endorsement of faithful believers over nearly two thousand years, for it has been recited by Christian communities at all times and in all places throughout the history of the Christian Church. And it is a benchmark of orthodoxy, that is, of right belief, guiding our understanding of God’s revealed truth at points where our sin-clouded minds might go astray.” - To Be a Christian, pg. 15-6

    *** Note on Accuracy: Jay misquotes Christ on the Cross saying that he was making reference to Psalm 21 (Domine, in virtute tua). In reality, Christ quoted Psalm 22 (Deus, Deus meus) when he cries out to the Father, “My God, My God, why have you forsaken me” (Psalm 22:1).

    • 50 min
    S1E2: To Be a Christian; Part 2.1 - Believing in Christ (Scripture and the Creeds)

    S1E2: To Be a Christian; Part 2.1 - Believing in Christ (Scripture and the Creeds)

    To Be a Christian: An Anglican Catechism

    Part II + Believing in Christ

    Holy Scripture and the Creeds

    “For Anglicans, as for all genuine Christians, authentic Christianity is apostolic Christianity. Apostolic Christianity rests on the historic, eyewitness testimony of Jesus’ followers, the apostles, to the facts of Jesus’ life, death, resurrection, ascension, present heavenly reign, and promised future return. Both Jesus and his apostles understood these facts to fulfill the Old Testament hopes of the Kingdom (or reign) of God, to which God’s covenant with Israel was intended to lead, and which the Christian Church has received as a reality from Jesus and his apostles. Anglicans affirm that the Bible, the Old and New Testament together, is “God’s Word written” (Articles of Religion, 20), from which we learn these authoritative facts. By the second century, these key facts of apostolic faith had been organized into a syllabus of topics for catechetical teaching (the Rule of Faith), and this syllabus became the Apostles’ Creed—so called because it sums up the apostolic faith.” - To Be a Christian, pg. 15

    Links mentioned in today’s episode:

    Anglican Studies Podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/primacy-of-scripture-part-1/id482438110?i=1000106715803

    Sacramentalist Podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/06-andy-stanley-marcionite-heretic-or-expositor-of-paul/id1457082281?i=1000438836588

    • 32 min
    B2: St. James of Jerusalem (October 23rd)

    B2: St. James of Jerusalem (October 23rd)

    October 23rd, Feast Day of St. James of Jerusalem

    St. James was the first bishop of Jerusalem and was a kinsman (brother?) of our Lord, Jesus Christ. He is mentioned frequently in the New Testament, and was the principle overseer of the Jerusalem Council in Acts 15. He is also Jay’s patron saint.

    Feast with us today as we learn about this important figure in the Apostolic Church.

    • 20 min

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