300 episodes

MarketScale is bringing you the best B2B audio content from our studios in Dallas, TX. With relevant industry interviews and shows like Business Casual, Business Class, and the Mecca Minute, we're unpacking the most industry-shaking B2B news, tips, and trends. Whether you're looking for casual content or professional ponderings, MarketScale is your ultimate workday companion.

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    • Business
    • 5.0, 3 Ratings

MarketScale is bringing you the best B2B audio content from our studios in Dallas, TX. With relevant industry interviews and shows like Business Casual, Business Class, and the Mecca Minute, we're unpacking the most industry-shaking B2B news, tips, and trends. Whether you're looking for casual content or professional ponderings, MarketScale is your ultimate workday companion.

    How the Toyota Production System Can Cut Costs and Grow Your Company

    How the Toyota Production System Can Cut Costs and Grow Your Company

    The Fourth Revolution explores the evolution of and science behind lean production practices with guest Stephen Dardaris, director of continuous improvement for Hillrom. From post-war factory production to modern-day automation, manufacturing has evolved and continues to change. Dardaris explained how Toyota’s Production System fits into production history while still influencing global manufacturing efficiency with revolutionary ideas and practices.Applicable for more than just cars, the Toyota Production System can apply to a variety of production environments, particularly high-mix, low volume production. Dardaris moved through the holistic picture of a company, from supply to assembly, transport and even accounting. By trimming away the fat and honing in on real, lean numbers, the Toyota Production System returns tangible profits.Lean production may seem like a no-brainer for better, more profitable production, but Dardaris said doing “lean” things is a lagging measure that produces results over time, not necessarily immediately upon implementation.For this reason, some lean practices require a leap of faith and trust in what may seem like radical change. Most companies, Dardaris said, are caught in the middle, afraid of risk and trusting the process. The Toyota Production System is not a “cost-out process,” a simple money-saving initiative.On the contrary, Dardaris said, TPS is a growth strategy, a business initiative designed to be more than just save a money-saver and a streamlining concept with an eye for big growth.

    • 47 min
    Electric Vehicles Impact on Tire Design

    Electric Vehicles Impact on Tire Design

    Welcome to this information quick hit edition of the fourth revolution, brought to you by Bartell. I’m James Kent. Today I'm going to talk about the impact electric vehicles have on tire Design.Environmental concerns have primarily driven the increasing popularity of electric cars, but the impacts of electric vehicles reach further than reducing carbon emissions. As the differences between electric and gasoline-powered cars become more evident, the automotive industry must adjust to support these new demands. One major area of research and development is in the tire industry.Tire design and manufacturing have evolved along with the automobile over the decades, and the electric vehicle phenomenon is another step in this journey. How will electric vehicles impact the tire market? Is the tire wear different? Will new specialty tires be in demand?The tire design must support the goal of optimizing the vehicle range of electric cars on a single charge while delivering high performance and a long lifecycle. With over 200 variables involved in tire design, including tread design, material selection, manufacturing process, construction, and sidewall design, this is no easy task.Tires are a critical component of overall electric vehicle performance. Differences in torque, mass, size, and rolling resistance each have a noticeable effect on the tire function and longevity. High--performance electric vehicles, such as Teslas, can wear out a set of tires in just 8,000-12,000 miles if driven hard.Michelin’s R&D team has been working tirelessly to deliver tires optimized for electric vehicles. Making tires for about 45 percent of the electric vehicles produced in the United States, Michelin dedicates much of its track time to electric vehicles. The effort has paid off as Michelin has made numerous advancements, including improving rolling resistance performance for electric vehicle tires.Electric vehicles are freeing drivers from the dependence on gasoline. These technologically advanced cars offer drivers a clean and comfortable ride, but tire wear is a major concern. Without the proper tire, this smooth ride could be cut short.At Bartell, we provide cutting-edge solutions for the tire and rubber industry. Helping build more efficient, effective, and safer tires for a wide range of vehicles, including the newest EVs, Bartell continues to improve manufacturing by delivering enhanced technologies.If you’d like to learn more about Bartell’s equipment for manufacturers in the tire and rubber industry, go to www.bartellmachineery.com/markets/tire-rubber.

    • 3 min
    Fourth Revolution: How Supplier Diversity Networks Offer Innovation with Heico's Madi Dixon

    Fourth Revolution: How Supplier Diversity Networks Offer Innovation with Heico's Madi Dixon

    Here on the Fourth Revolution by Bartell, we talk about the disruptive technologies and trends that are changing the way we live and work. But today's topic is a bit more retrospective, as host Shelby Skrhak discusses the importance of corporate diversity initiatives with Madi Dixon, Women Business Enterprises Business Development Ambassador for Bartell parent company, Heico."Diversity shouldn't really be a conversation, but something that's accepted throughout a company's core values (and is) equally as important as costs and quality," Dixon said.A corporate supplier diversity program prioritizes using minority-owned, women-owned, veteran-owned, LGBT-owned, service-disabled or veteran-owned businesses as suppliers. Heico has long been certified as a women-owned, operated and controlled business, or WBE.Though supplier diversity been used as a vein of conscious capitalism in the past, almost as a gesture of goodwill, today's diversity network programs are not only competitive in cost and quality, but offer businesses an advantage."Businesses want innovation and partnership," Dixon said. "When we talk with businesses, they want to know how we can partner with them (and) how can we provide long-term solutions with something they may have never thought of before."To that end, Dixon offers this advice for businesses dipping their toes into supplier diversity programs: "Success in the supplier diversity network is through relationship building. Certification allows us to establish those relationships with supplier teams and, in turn, we create and grow the business."

    • 16 min
    How to Bring Your Legacy Company into the Digital Revolution with Derran Smith of Pettibone LLC

    How to Bring Your Legacy Company into the Digital Revolution with Derran Smith of Pettibone LLC

    The newest technologies like 5G, IoT devices, AI, and machine learning are "sexy" topics that drive conversation and thought leadership, but for many legacy companies, they're a moonshot to incorporate into their own businesses. Old technology, old methodology, and the feared "That's the way we've always done it!" are what keep long-time manufacturing businesses perpetually behind the times.Derran Smith, Vice President of Marketing for Pettibone, LLC, has observed this firsthand and shares his insight on large scale company-wide change for this episode of The Fourth Revolution by Bartell. Pettibone manufactures and markets a wide variety of material handling loaders, mobile site prep equipment, and automated production systems, as well as knobs, handles, custom plastic components, and more.No one ever said change is easy, and especially when it comes to changing entire products, processes, and even incorporating "robotic personnel" if you will, it's downright daunting."Companies are pouring millions of dollars into digital transformation initiatives, but a high percentage fail to pay off because companies put the cart before the horse focusing on a specific technology," Smith said.That's why Smith advises starting with your most central mission: your overall business strategy."Companies need to do the hard work of fitting the change into the overall business strategy first," he said. "In many cases, a wholesale disruption isn't necessary. You can respond by looking at your manufacturing processes and your distribution channels. What technology can you purchase today to help you?"

    • 27 min
    Fourth Revolution Headlines: Amid a Waning Workforce, Manufacturing Jobs Grow

    Fourth Revolution Headlines: Amid a Waning Workforce, Manufacturing Jobs Grow

    Tyson Foods is investing big bucks into its digital transformation. On August 8th it unveiled its brand new automation technology center in Springdale. Chairman John Tyson touted the facility as a, quote, "commitment to creating the next generation of manufacturing solutions through advanced automation, robotics and machine learning." The center has multi-faceted space for a machine vision technology lab, food production simulations and hands-on robotics training to open new doors for Tyson employees.Even amid job loss and and a waning workforce, the manufacturing industry has actually added jobs, according to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics' July report. In July, the sector added 16,000 new jobs, with the automotive industry supplying the bulk of the employment. This represents the second straight month of growth for manufacturing jobs, though it still doesn't match 2018's pace, which had almost 200% more fresh manufacturing jobs by this time last year.These have been your Fourth Revolution Headlines, by Bartell. 

    • 1 min
    The Solution to the Manufacturing Labor Shortage Might Be An Internal One with Greg Barnett of The Predictive Index

    The Solution to the Manufacturing Labor Shortage Might Be An Internal One with Greg Barnett of The Predictive Index

    You can hardly listen to a political speech without hearing the buzzword - “manufacturing jobs.” As baby boomers retire from their lifelong careers in manufacturing, no one is stepping up to fill these vacant positions. But why?The manufacturing industry has an “industry image issue," said Greg Barnett, senior vice president of The Predictive Index. Manufacturing jobs have lost their glamour as the industry has aged. In today’s flashy tech-centered world, manufacturing jobs look drab and unattractive in comparison to Silicon Valley startups.On this episode, we were joined by Barnett to discuss how manufacturing business can make internal changes to their company and recruit smart, long-term employees. Manufacturing jobs have several perks, and the industry itself is working hard to transition into the modern world by rebranding their look and appealing to the rising workforce.Core company changes are crucial to keeping the manufacturing industry alive, but Barnett said that all to often, he hears from his clients: “We’re not Google. We don’t do ping pong tables...and free food.”So how can manufacturing companies modernize and attract the rising workforce? Barnett broke it down into three parts: designing new leadership, defining company culture, and inspiring the workforce. Manufacturing businesses are in desperate need of a rebrand, starting with how young workers view and are trained for jobs.Education today is mostly done online, yet there is no pipeline for training future manufacturing workers on a digital platform. By redefining company culture, highlighting employment benefits to the public, and optimizing the workforce with the modern tools to succeed and grow, the manufacturing industry can flourish in today’s modern world.

    • 40 min

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