39 episodes

Explore the people, news and events that keep the Uncompahgre Valley moving forward. The Montrose Press's podcast, Montrose Fresh, brings you insights into the home of the Black Canyon National Park three days a week. 

https://www.montrosepress.com/

 

Montrose Fres‪h‬ Montrose Daily Press

    • Daily News
    • 5.0 • 9 Ratings

Explore the people, news and events that keep the Uncompahgre Valley moving forward. The Montrose Press's podcast, Montrose Fresh, brings you insights into the home of the Black Canyon National Park three days a week. 

https://www.montrosepress.com/

 

    Bill would lift the statute of limitations on civil sexual abuse claims

    Bill would lift the statute of limitations on civil sexual abuse claims

    Welcome to Montrose Fresh, from The Montrose Daily Press. It’s FridayFebruary 26th, and we’re here with local news, events, announcements, jobs, and more that matter to us here in Western Colorado. 

    Today - A bill that would lift the statute of limitations on civil sexual abuse claims moves forward.

    Today’s episode is brought to you by Elevate Internet. Whether it’s for your home or your business they offer the best speeds at the best price. Right now, if you refer a friend you can get $25 off! Give them a call for more information at 844-386-8744 or visit them at www.elevateinternet.com.

    Now, our feature story...

    A bill that would lift the statute of limitations for civil suits related to child sexual abuse cleared committee on Wednesday. The sponsors are hopeful of greater justice for victims.

    Senator Don Coram of Montrose and Sen. Jessie Danielson of Wheat Ridge, are the primary sponsors of Senate Bill 73. x

    The bill is similar to one that Coram advanced last year. That one was held over indefinitely with no explanation. Now, he is optimistic that SB-73 will pass.

    The bill would change the existing law that prevents child sexual assault survivors from bringing a civil suit after six years of turning 18. 

    In addition to lifting this limit, the bill would eliminate restrictions on what damages can be recovered. 

    Senate Bill 73 also further defines sexual misconduct.

    If the measure becomes law, victims of child sex crimes would be able to sue for any injury dating from 2014, going forward.

    House sponsor Matt Soper, said a child typically would not be able to tell their story until much later in life. By that time, the statute of limitations may have expired.

    Soper noted that passing SB-73 would at least give victims the chance to have their cases heard in civil court.

    He reiterated that the bill applies only to those who were under 18 when they were sexually abused. 

    Raana Simmons, director of Public Affairs for the Colorado Coalition Against Sexual Assault, recently said that healing from sexual trauma has no timeline. And the civil legal system is the only system designed to provide survivors with the financial resources they need to cover the costs of things like counseling and medical care.

    To Simmons, survivors in Colorado deserve the ability to access the civil legal system on their own schedule. 

    There’s a companion bill too. Senate Bill 88, the Child Sexual Abuse Accountability Act.

    This bill would create a new right of civil action targeting institutions accused of protecting predators.

    Soper said that it’s a creative way to try to get institutions like the Boy Scouts, the Catholic Church, the Olympic Committee and even our schools to help provide evidence, not harbor predators.

    In the meantime, Soper and Coram are pleased to see SB-73 pass unanimously through the Senate Health and Human Services Committee. 

    There is bipartisanship and geographic diversity behind the bill.

    To stay up to date on this story, or read more, visit us at Montrosepress.com.

    Now, some local history. This week's local history is brought to you by England Fence. England Fence is family owned and operated, and they're ready to help you build your dream fence, archway, gate, or deck. Give them a call at 970-249-4430, or head over to their website englandfence.com.

    The Museum of the Mountain West is a history museum in Montrose, If you haven’t already seen, it includes a collection of historic log cabins, Western town stores, and other historic buildings which have all been moved to the site.

    Back in 2018 The museum was listed on the Colorado state register of historic properties. The museum even owns a historic carriage shop, where champion boxer Jack Dempsey trained.

    And finally, before we go we’d like to take a moment to remember the life of Eldon R. Reynolds of Delta.

    Eldon was a twin, born in L

    • 7 min
    A local resource for families dealing with mental health issues.

    A local resource for families dealing with mental health issues.

    Good morning I’m subbing in today! Welcome to Montrose Fresh, from The Montrose Daily Press. It’s Wednesday February 24th and we’re here with local news, events, announcements, and more that matter to us here in Western Colorado. 

     Today -- a local resource for families dealing with mental health issues.

    Today’s episode is brought to you by Elevate Internet. Whether it’s for your home or your business they offer the best speeds at the best price. Right now, if you refer a friend you can get $25 off! Give them a call for more information at 844-386-8744 or visit them at elevateinternet.com

    Mental health issues affect not only the people experiencing them, but also their families.

    So starting March 17th, the National Alliance on Mental Illness will begin hosting family support groups in Montrose.

    The meetings will then take place every third Wednesday of each month from 5:30 to 7 p.m. at P.I.C Place. 

    “There seems to be a significant need,” said Eva Veitch, who is co-facilitating the NAMI support groups with Kathy Riggle.

    The National Alliance on Mental Illness -- or NAMI (pronuncation of NAMI -- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8Un9fy_3wbY) already has ongoing Zoom meetings each Thursday which draw people from all over the region --even from out of state. And in Montrose, families keep calling, seeking support as their loved ones struggle with illnesses like bipolar, schizophrenia, and suicide attempts.

    NAMI Western Slope Program Director Leslie Kent said that supporting and educating family members is critical to the overall family dynamic.

    Kent knows firsthand how important resources like this are. She was married for 22 years to a person dealing with bipolar. For her, NAMI was a lifesaver and a game-changer, because she finally found a family that understood what she was experiencing.

    Kent now conducts the regular Zoom-based family support sessions every Thursday.

    And she said she is excited to see family support meetings start up in Montrose soon.

    Outside of the zoom sessions and support meetings NAMI also operates a national helpline at 800-950-6264. And the crisis text line can be reached by texting NAMI to 741-741.

    Other resources included the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline, 800-273-8255, and locally, The Center for Mental Health crisis line, 970-252-6220.

    Of course, if someone you know is in immediate danger, call 911, but notify the dispatcher that it is a psychiatric emergency and ask for someone trained in crisis intervention to respond.

    Next, we’d like to highlight local athlete Ashden Oberg who has come into his own this season as a key component for the Montrose boys basketball team.

    His coach says that he’s made great strides from last year. 

    Oberg has provided the Indians with an interior presence, one that Montrose used with ease in a recent win against Moffat. He’s been steady around the basket, shooting 76% on the season, with three performances where he was perfect from the field.

    Finally, we’d like to take a moment today to remember the life of Kurt Allen Haugland.

    Kurt was born on December 16th, 1980, the second of twins and youngest of four. He grew up in central Wisconsin and graduated high school in 1999. After high school, Kurt, along with the rest of the family, moved to Colorado. During his time there, he helped his parents build their home and graduated from Colorado Mesa University with a degree in biology. He later attended Midwestern University and got a Masters in Cardiovascular Science.

    Kurt went on to work for Scripps Memorial Hospital in California, where he played an intricate role in life-saving heart surgeries. He was also actively involved with his church in California where he helped build a church in Costa Rica and spread the gospel along the Amazon River in Brazil.

    Kurt had a great sense of humor and a razor sharp wit that always kep

    • 6 min
    How Gov. Jared Polis' plans align with developments in Montrose

    How Gov. Jared Polis' plans align with developments in Montrose

    Good morning and welcome to Montrose Fresh, from The Montrose Daily Press. It’s MondayFebruary 22nd and we’re here to bring you a closer look at our top stories, events and more that matter to us here in Western Colorado. 

    Today -  We’re taking a look at how some of Governor Jared Polis' plans align with developments in Montrose.

    Today’s episode is brought to you by Elevate Internet. Whether it’s for your home or your business they offer the best speeds at the best price. Right now, if you refer a friend you can get $25 off! Give them a call for more information at 844-386-8744 or visit them at elevateinternet.com

    Standing before lawmakers in his State of the State address on Wednesday, Governor Jared Polis discussed year long challenges the state has faced because of the pandemic and other factors.

    He also talked about the future in Colorado, a future that could be aided by tax cuts, the expansion of broadband internet access, and upgrading roads.

    Polis has alluded to his more-than-$1 billion economic stimulus plan - a plan that could create thousands of jobs for the economy.

    During his speech, Polis said he wants to get rid of special interest tax breaks and use the savings to lower taxes. 

    He also said he’s focused on eliminating the business personal property tax to benefit thousands of small businesses.

    In addition, he wants to provide up to $600 per child through the Colorado Child Tax Credit and stop taxing Social Security benefits for seniors.

    Polis noted that meeting these goals should not only help jumpstart Colorado and boost the economy, but will improve the quality of life for Coloradans.

    The message drew applause from the crowd.

    The $24 million raised for the Colorado COVID Relief Fund was also highlighted.

    But how do these goals align with current developments in Montrose?

    A few topics in particular that were brought up, aligned with the potential future of Montrose. 

    One of those has been a hot topic in recent months. Affordable housing.

    Montrose’s push for affordable housing dates back to at least 2016.

    Montrose’s City Council’s support for affordable housing in the community has been well documented.  And the councilors have been vocal about the need during city council meetings and work sessions for several months.

    And housing developments are potentially on the way. The Basecamp Subdivision, a multi-family development could bring 276 units. The HUB at Montrose Crossing also presents another opportunity for apartment units.

    The wealth of new dwelling spaces could become attractive options for locals residents, and open up housing for others in the area.

    Polis also mentioned the need to invest in rural communities. Though Montrose has already seen an influx of new business on Main additional funds may give a significant boost to the Montrose downtown area.

    And then there’s the proposal to stop taxing seniors’ Social Security benefits. This could help those in Montrose relying on such a plan. People aged 65-74 lead the pack among all age groups in Montrose -- that’s 71% higher than the state average.

    The move to expand broadband access has already made some headway in Montrose. Earlier this month, Montrose County School District, in partnership with Elevate and Clear Networx, received a state grant to address the need for high-speed internet within the community. This will aid students, educators and other staff who lack stable and reliable internet access needed for online learning.

    Finally, any sort of relief on tax burdens for middle class families may be welcomed, too, as 27% of household income in Montrose is below $25,000.

    And before we go,  we’d like to highlight Fran Noonan. Noonan was experiencing numbness in her hand and so, went to the emergency room. She wasn’t thinking that she would soon be headed to St. Mary’s Hospital in Grand Junction

    • 8 min
    Montrose County now vaccinating thousands per week

    Montrose County now vaccinating thousands per week

    Welcome to Montrose Fresh, from The Montrose Daily Press. It’s FridayFebruary 19th, and we’re here with local news, events, announcements, jobs, and more that matter to us here in Western Colorado. 

    Today - With larger and larger shipments of the coronavirus vaccine, Montrose County now administers thousands per week.

    Today’s episode is brought to you by Elevate Internet. Whether it’s for your home or your business they offer the best speeds at the best price. Right now, if you refer a friend you can get $25 off! Give them a call for more information at 844-386-8744 or visit them at www.elevateinternet.com.

    Now, our feature story...

    Montrose County has gone from being neglected in terms of the COVID-19 vaccine supply - to now receiving larger and larger shipments. 

    We went from being able to administer a few hundred vaccines during the first weeks in January, to nearly 3,000 over the course of just three days last week.

    Montrose County Media Relations Manager Katie Yergensen talked about the change in pace on  Tuesday during a League of Women update. Yergensen is also the county’s co-lead on vaccination logistics.

    Here’s what she had to say:

    Vaccine supplies come from the county via the state, which in turn receives allocations from the federal government. In addition to public health, about 10 community based providers also receive vaccine doses from the government, as do some senior care facilities.

    Thanks to continued advocacy by commissioners and state legislators, Montrose County has been receiving larger shipments than back in January.

    Last week, the county and partners kept long lines flowing steadily. The county is even consulting with a home health care company to help identify housebound individuals in need of the vaccine.

    The increasing supplies are cutting down the county’s wait list, which at one point was about 6,500 strong.

    But as more community-based providers like medical practices and pharmacies come online, vaccines could outpace demand within a month according to Dr. Joe Adragna - the Montrose County pandemic specialist. 

    That would free up county employees who have been pulled away from other duties. 

    Adragna also recently addressed some of the prevalent myths circulating about the vaccine.

    He said some people are very concerned that getting it implants them with a nano-chip for tracking. Not only is that “just not true,” but believing it requires a lot of faith in a government that initially could not assemble enough protective gear at the start of the pandemic.

    Adragna said that of the 52 million doses administered nationally, as many as 5% might not have had an immune response — but the vaccine is, at present, the best weapon.

    Over the past two days the county estimated vaccinating around 2,000 people, including some in Phase 1B2, which includes people between the ages of 65 and 69 as well as school district employees.

    For information about the vaccine priority phases and to see about pre registration, visit montrosecountyjic.com. 

    Now, some local history. This week's local history is brought to you by England Fence. England Fence is family owned and operated, and they're ready to help you build your dream fence, archway, gate, or deck. Give them a call at 970-249-4430, or head over to their website englandfence.com.

    Born in 1896 in Montrose Keplar Barth Johnson was an American architect and a member of the American Institute of Architects. From 1937 to 1962, he was the Region 5 Architect for the U.S. Forest Service. In 1945, he designed an experimental and innovative lookout tower on La Cumbre Peak in the Los Padres National Forest. 

    And finally, before we go we’d like to take a moment to remember the life of 

    Sheryl Lynn Starbuck. Sheryl was born in Montrose, and grew up in Olathe, graduating from Olathe high school in 1968. After high school, Shery

    • 8 min
    Recent storm brings power outages and much needed precipitation

    Recent storm brings power outages and much needed precipitation

    Good morning I’m subbing in today! Welcome to Montrose Fresh, from The Montrose Daily Press. It’s Wednesday February 17th and we’re here with local news, events, announcements, and more that matter to us here in Western Colorado. 

     Today -- Although the region remains in drought conditions, the recent storm brought Montrose to .85 inches of precipitation since the start of the year.

    Today’s episode is brought to you by Elevate Internet. Whether it’s for your home or your business they offer the best speeds at the best price. Right now, if you refer a friend you can get $25 off! Give them a call for more information at 844-386-8744 or visit them at elevateinternet.com

    But before we begin, -- The Montrose United Methodist Church will host lenten services online at 7 p.m. tonight. To participate visit montroseUMC.org

    Now, our feature story. A powerful storm draped Montrose in white on Sunday. Nearly 10 inches of snow fell within the city limits. A light snow fell again in parts of town on Tuesday morning.

    A strong cold front had moved through the state, dropping temperatures to well below freezing and, in some parts of Colorado, below zero.

    Although the region remains locked in drought conditions, the recent storm brought Montrose to .85 inches of precipitation since the start of the year. That’s just shy of the average.

    A chilly Valentine’s Day played out across the country, freezing roads and flipping vehicles in places like Oklahoma and Texas. And power outages afflicted citizens nationwide as temperatures plunged.

    In Montrose, some households lost power. The Delta-Montrose Electric Association described them as “small but long.” Many of these were actually from car crashes involving DMEA power poles and equipment.

    Power crews worked restoring power from 3 a.m. Sunday through the mid-afternoon.

    In all, 101 DMEA members experienced power interruptions.

    Jasen Bronec, DMEA’s CEO said that weather systems like that always create increased demand on the electric grid, but he’s proud that they delivered on our commitment.

    Because of the cold snap and possibility of more snow, DMEA is suspending all service disconnections through February 21st.

    Members struggling to pay their electric bills are encouraged to contact DMEA as soon as they can. 

    DMEA also offered some suggestions for minimizing the occurrence and impact of outages:

    First -- drive with caution in bad weather.

    Stock up on flashlights, batteries, books and board games.

    Consider a portable power bank to charge cell phones.

    Conserve heat by keeping doors and windows closed.

    The winter weather is also yet another reminder of the perils of backcountry recreation.

    As we’ve mentioned in other episodes, in Colorado alone, 10 people have died in avalanches this season. 

    The Colorado Avalanche Information Center said the past week was the deadliest for recreational avalanche accidents in the country.

    Persistent slab avalanches are common, but the conditions this winter are not.

    Experts reiterate the need to check the avalanche forecast and conditions every day at avalanche.state.co.us, and to be prepared with the proper equipment. Don’t head into the backcountry alone.

    To learn more visit us at montrosepress.com

    Next, we’d like to highlight some local athletes! 

    Known for their offensive prowess through the first six games, the Indians’ defense potential was on display during their 50-23 win over Grand Junction Central on Saturday. The win was Montrose’s seventh as the team hit the halfway mark on the season.

    Finally, we’d like to take a moment today to remember the life  of Robert Lloyd Dix of Montrose. He went home to be with the Lord after a tragic and hard-fought battle with COVID. Bob grew up in Colorado, and married his high school sweetheart, Sue, in 1966. They lived in Gunnison while Bob got his teaching de

    • 8 min
    A local charity takes steps to set up near downtown

    A local charity takes steps to set up near downtown

    Good morning and welcome to Montrose Fresh, from The Montrose Daily Press. It’s MondayFebruary 15th and we’re here to bring you a closer look at our top stories, events and more that matter to us here in Western Colorado. 

    Today -  A local charity takes steps to set up near downtown, their goal is to serve the homeless, hungry and low-income individuals in our community.

    Today’s episode is brought to you by Elevate Internet. Whether it’s for your home or your business they offer the best speeds at the best price. Right now, if you refer a friend you can get $25 off! Give them a call for more information at 844-386-8744 or visit them at elevateinternet.com

    Before we begin, we’re excited to announce the launch of our new neighbor discussion platform. Neighbor is a free online forum you can trust to connect with your community, focus on facts & make a difference.​ Here’s managing editor Justin Tubbs on how this platform will work within our community.

    Visit NABUR.montrosepress.com to learn more.

    Now, our feature story.

    As a local charity takes steps to set up near downtown, the City of Montrose is looking to resume a homelessness task force.

    The Shepherd’s Hand Center is in the process of setting up a food distribution and services site. After months of back and forth with the city, the charity’s founder Garey Martinez was able to meet with City Manager Bill Bell and others to hash out some issues around what zoning applies to the building.

    Martinez said once Bell was told Shepherd’s Hand is not planning an overnight shelter there, everything lightened up. Bell agreed to convene the task force to help address the types of issues Shepherd’s Hand deals with while serving homeless, hungry and low-income individuals.

    Martinez said the planned center was not intending to replicate emergency overnight, seasonal shelter - which is currently provided by Montrose Lighthouse Ministries.

    He also noted that he’s very excited to be able to say that he’s cooperating and working with the City of Montrose. And because of the ongoing pandemic, Montrose’s needs are growing even more.

    The idea is to use the South Second Street location to continue the food box distribution Martinez currently does out of Cedar Creek Church. They’ll offer wraparound services by providing office space for similar nonprofits; a community room for those who want to use it, and a location to serve hot meals through the food trailer.

    Martinez and others have been busily renovating the South Second Street building. They anticipate being able to open in mid-March, but they’ll likely move the food trailer before then. 

    The goal is for it to be a community center, not just for the homeless and low-income, but open for everybody.

    Martinez and many others have worked for years to address homelessness and related issues. He is part of the Lighthouse Ministry as well, and also is on the board of the Food Bank of the Rockies.

    The Lighthouse is able to provide that overnight housing by subleasing from Tuxedo Corn the Brown Center. The city-owned building is leased to the growers who make up Tuxedo Corn for summer use as farmworker housing. In the winter, under the sublease, the Lighthouse uses it as an overnight shelter.

    Martinez also collaborates with more than 20 other organizations that grapple with the needs poverty creates in Montrose.

    To stay up to date on this story, visit us at montrosepress.com.

    And before we go,  we’d like to take a moment to remember the life of Rick Dwain Hurt, of Montrose. Rick was born in 1953 in Texas. He graduated from High School in 1971, and then attended the University of Texas in Austin, earning a degree in anthropology. While there, Rick discovered the Austin music scene which inspired his life-long love of Americana music. He got a master’s degree in archaeology from Texas Tech Univers

    • 7 min

Customer Reviews

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downhilldave360 ,

Nice to have in Montrose

I like that this is focused on Montrose. Boebert really is an idiot.

theshowerscenex3 ,

Awesome local news

Really look forward to every new episode that comes out!

ConradAtlas ,

Short and sweet - Great

Perfect bite sized review of local news. Thanks.

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