13 episodes

This podcast features "Native History Nerds" who emphasize that Native American and Indigenous histories and stories need to be taught and learned by everyone, not only in North America but also throughout the world. The primary hosts and founders of Native Circles are Dr. Farina King (Diné) and Sarah Newcomb (Tsimshian), who were inspired to start this podcast to educate wider publics about the interconnections and significance of Native American, Native Alaskan, and Indigenous experiences and matters. Dr. King is an associate professor of Native American History and the founding director of the Center for Indigenous Community Engagement (CICE) at Northeastern State University (NSU) in Tahlequah, homelands of the Cherokee Nation and United Keetoowah Band of Cherokees. Based in Dallas, Texas, Newcomb works as a freelance editor, writer, and blogger with degrees in English with a Focus in non-Fiction Creative Writing. Learn more about the podcast and episodes on the official website of "Native Circles" at https://nativecirclespodcast.com/.

Native Circles Dr. Farina King & Sarah Newcomb

    • History
    • 5.0 • 5 Ratings

This podcast features "Native History Nerds" who emphasize that Native American and Indigenous histories and stories need to be taught and learned by everyone, not only in North America but also throughout the world. The primary hosts and founders of Native Circles are Dr. Farina King (Diné) and Sarah Newcomb (Tsimshian), who were inspired to start this podcast to educate wider publics about the interconnections and significance of Native American, Native Alaskan, and Indigenous experiences and matters. Dr. King is an associate professor of Native American History and the founding director of the Center for Indigenous Community Engagement (CICE) at Northeastern State University (NSU) in Tahlequah, homelands of the Cherokee Nation and United Keetoowah Band of Cherokees. Based in Dallas, Texas, Newcomb works as a freelance editor, writer, and blogger with degrees in English with a Focus in non-Fiction Creative Writing. Learn more about the podcast and episodes on the official website of "Native Circles" at https://nativecirclespodcast.com/.

    Dr. John Little on creating change and awareness through Indigenous centered projects.

    Dr. John Little on creating change and awareness through Indigenous centered projects.

    Join us as we speak with Dr. John Little, a Standing Rock Dakota, about his research, work, and various projects which support Native Americans. Dr. John Little is currently the Director of Native Recruitment and Alumni Engagement at the University of South Dakota. He earned his Ph.D. in History at the University of Minnesota. His dissertation is titled, "Vietnam Akíčita: Lakota And Dakota Military Tradition In The Twentieth Century," which examines Native American Vietnam War veteran and military experiences. He has taught in Native American Studies, Leadership and Sustainability, and History. He has also developed a variety of student success and retention programs and developed national and statewide recruitment networks for students. He was a past director of the Indian University of North America, a Native American college readiness program for high school graduates at the Crazy Horse Memorial in the Black Hills of South Dakota. His interests are broad but include history, Native student success and retention, leadership, education, Native Studies, Lakota and Dakota language, and film. He has co-directed a feature length award winning film, titled More Than A Word, and several other short pieces. His film work has supported the movement to change the name of the Washington national football team mascot, emphasizing issues about Native American-themed mascots and cultural appropriation.

    • 55 min
    A conversation about San Carlos Apache history with Marcus Macktima

    A conversation about San Carlos Apache history with Marcus Macktima

    This episode features a conversation about San Carlos Apache history with Marcus Macktima, a San Carlos Apache scholar. He received a BA in History with a minor in Native American Studies in 2015; and his MA in Native American Studies in 2018 at the University of Oklahoma. Marcus is a doctoral candidate in the History Department of the University of Oklahoma. His dissertation is tentatively titled, “Issues of Forced Political Identities: The San Carlos Apache Peoples.” In 2022, he accepted a position at Northern Arizona University as a pre/post-doctoral fellow.
    Look for his chapter, “Sacred Space and Identity: The Fight for Chi’chil Biłdagoteel (Oak Flat) and the History of the San Carlos Apachean Peoples,” in The North American West in the Twenty-First Century (November 2022) edited by Brenden W. Rensink.

    • 47 min
    Alaska Native history and food sovereignty with Dr. Bridget Groat

    Alaska Native history and food sovereignty with Dr. Bridget Groat

    Dr. Bridget Groat is currently an assistant professor in the Native American and Indigenous Studies and history departments at Fort Lewis College. She is originally from Naknek, Alaska, which is a village located in the Bristol Bay region. She is Inupiaq, Alutiiq, Yup'ik, and Dena'ina. Her research focuses on salmon, Alaska Natives, food sovereignty, land and water, environmental history, Indigenous women, and Indigenous people.

    Resources and ways to support:
    United Tribes of Bristol Bay - www.utbb.com
    Patagonia - www.patagonia.com
    Trout Unlimited - www.tu.org

    • 47 min
    Candessa Tehee and Indigenous Allotment Stories

    Candessa Tehee and Indigenous Allotment Stories

    Dr. Candessa Tehee is a Cherokee Nation citizen who earned her Ph.D. in Anthropology from the University of Oklahoma. She is also an accomplished artist who was recognized as a Cherokee National Treasure for fingerweaving in 2019. She previously served as the Executive Director of the Cherokee Heritage Center, as the Manager of the Cherokee Language Program, and worked in the Office of Curriculum and Instruction at the Cherokee Nation Immersion Charter School. She joined the faculty of Northeastern State University in Fall 2016 as a professor in the Department of Cherokee and Indigenous Studies. She currently serves as the Coordinator for the Cherokee Cultural Studies and Cherokee Education degree programs. She is the District 2 Tribal Councilor of the Cherokee Nation Tribal Council.
    See Candessa Tehee, "ᎪᎩ ᎤᏗᏞᎩ ᏗᏛᎪᏗ ᎾᏂᏪᏍᎬ ᎶᎶ: You can hear locusts in the heat of the summer," in Allotment Stories: Indigenous Land Relations under Settler Siege (2021) edited by Daniel Heath Justice and Jean M. O'Brien. Find the book at the following link: https://www.upress.umn.edu/book-division/books/allotment-stories

    • 37 min
    Samuel Villarreal Catanach on the role of language revitalization within the process of decolonization

    Samuel Villarreal Catanach on the role of language revitalization within the process of decolonization

    Samuel Villarreal Catanach is from and grew up in P'osuwaegeh Owingeh (the Pueblo of Pojoaque). He serves as the director of the Pueblo's Tewa Language Department. Samuel's goal is to give back to his community while continually defining and strengthening his identity and role as a Pueblo person. In this episode he shares his passion and personal experiences with language revitalization within the process of decolonization, why it matters for all Indigenous peoples to learn and use our languages and histories, the challenges within the field of language revitalization, and some uplifting observations that he has had during his time in this line of work.

    Resources: 
    First Peoples’ Cultural Council – fpcc.ca  
    Where Are Your Keys – whereareyourkeys.org
    The Language Warrior's Manifesto: How to Keep Our Languages Alive No Matter the Odds by Anton Treuer
    How to Keep Your Language Alive: A Commonsense Approach to One-on-One Language Learning by Leanne Hinton
    The Routledge Handbook of Language Revitalization by Leanne Hinton (Editor), Leena Huss (Editor), and Gerald Roche (Editor).
    Becoming Fluent: How Cognitive Science Can Help Adults Learn a Foreign Language by Richard Roberts and Roger Kreuz.

    • 1 hr 3 min
    Davina Two Bears on Decolonizing Anthropological Studies and Indigenous History

    Davina Two Bears on Decolonizing Anthropological Studies and Indigenous History

    In this episode, we speak with Dr. Davina Two Bears, a  Diné (Navajo) scholar from Diné Bikéyah (Navajo land) of Northern Arizona. Two Bears is a Visiting Assistant Professor of Anthropology and Postdoctoral Fellow at Swarthmore College. She shares with us her knowledge and research of the Old Leupp Boarding school, a federal American Indian boarding school on the Navajo reservation. She emphasizes the survivance and resistance of Diné youth and people.

    Dr. Two Bears has volunteered as a DJ playing Native American traditional and contemporary music, which you can learn more about at https://www.dublab.com/djs/davina-two-bears.

    You can watch some of Dr. Two Bears's presentations via the following links:

    "Shimásání Dóó Shicheii Bi’ólta’ - My Grandmother’s and Grandfather’s School," Cotsen Institute of Archaeology at UCLA, posted September 3, 2020.

    "Researching My Heritage Diné Navajo Survivance / The Old Leupp Boarding School with Davina Two Bears," School for Advanced Research, November 6, 2019.

    • 44 min

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