36 episodes

Speaking to Nepalis working to build a better country, and going beyond the usual discourse on 'development'. We're always looking for new voices and great ideas to chat about.

Nepal Now Marty Logan

    • Society & Culture
    • 5.0 • 3 Ratings

Speaking to Nepalis working to build a better country, and going beyond the usual discourse on 'development'. We're always looking for new voices and great ideas to chat about.

    Recovering Nepal’s stolen art and restoring its culture

    Recovering Nepal’s stolen art and restoring its culture

    I’ve lived in Nepal for over a decade now, and I’m still astonished to see where, and what, Nepalis worship. Temples and shrines are mostly obvious—sometimes because roads or sidewalks will curve sharply to avoid them—but as I’m walking through my neighbourhood I might spot a smudge of auspicious vermillion powder on a tree trunk, a tiny niche in a cement wall, or even on a sidewalk.

    That is why I was not surprised when today’s guest, Roshan Mishra of Taragaon Museum and the Global Nepali Museum, stressed that Nepal’s is a living culture. And that is one of the main reasons he is among a group of dedicated culture activists who have just launched a new campaign to repatriate idols and other works of art that were stolen from Nepal after it opened to tourism in the 1950s.

    One estimate is that 70-80 percent of ‘gods and goddesses’ were spirited from the country until the 1990s. Activists have been trying for years to get them back, with some success. Mishra says the strength of the new Nepal Heritage Recovery Campaign is that it adopted a process to work with the Nepal department of archaeology and other institutions, inside and outside the country. Since it launched informally in January of this year, more than 25 possibly stolen objects have been identified, a “huge achievement”, he says.

    Just one note: when describing the launch of the new campaign Roshan refers a couple of times to the DG. That is the director general of Nepal’s department of archaeology.

    I’m happy to be posting this episode in the middle of one of Nepal’s biggest festivals—Dasain. To everyone listening who is celebrating, Happy Dasain!

    Resources

    Nepal Heritage Recovery Campaign

    Global Nepali Museum

    Lost Arts of Nepal

    Nepal Now social links
    Facebook
    Instagram
    Twitter
    LinkedIn
    Thanks as always to Nikunja Nepal for advice and inspiration.
    Music: amaretto needs ice ... by urmymuse (c) copyright 2018 Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution Noncommercial  (3.0) license.  
    http://dig.ccmixter.org/files/urmymuse/57996 Ft: Apoxode

    • 29 min
    Women start leading local climate adaptation work

    Women start leading local climate adaptation work

    In less than a month COP26 will have begun. Because of the shocking and destructive fires, floods, droughts and other climate disasters worldwide in the past year, it’s a good guess that more people than ever will focus on the global climate meeting in the UK.  How much will the leaders of the richest and most polluting countries promise to cut greenhouse gas emissions that cause global warming, and how much money will they pledge to poorer countries to adapt to the new, dangerous climate realities? Those are the questions that everyone will want answered.

    Meanwhile, every day, people on the ground have no choice but to adapt in order to survive in a new world of intense rainfall, heat and cold. In Nepal, women are especially affected: they must walk further to fetch the day’s water, tend to family members who become ill from previously unknown diseases borne by mosquitoes flying ever higher in the hills and, as they increasingly lead household farms, women must find alternatives when water becomes too scarce to grow traditional crops.

    Thanks to one initiative, women are also taking the lead to approach local governments for money to fund projects to adapt to climate change. Today we’ll hear about three efforts in Bardiya and Ilam districts, spearheaded by women trained to identify community needs and develop plans and budgets necessary to respond to them.

    Speaking of money, our guest today, Anuja Shrestha from TEWA, will mention lakhs of Nepali rupees. If you don’t know this term, one lakh equals 100,000 rupees.

    If you haven't already, don't forget to like, follow or favourite Nepal Now in your usual podcast app. Leave a review in Apple podcasts if you think more people should know about the show. Thanks!

    Resources

    TEWA

    Prakriti Resources Center

    COP26
    Nepal Now social links
    Facebook
    Instagram
    Twitter
    LinkedIn
    Thanks as always to Nikunja Nepal for advice and inspiration.
    Music: amaretto needs ice ... by urmymuse (c) copyright 2018 Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution Noncommercial  (3.0) license.       http://dig.ccmixter.org/files/urmymuse/57996 Ft: Apoxode

    • 31 min
    Maximize mask wearing

    Maximize mask wearing

    Vaccines, vaccines, vaccines. This is what I’m talking and reading about these days when the subject is Covid-19. I’ve had my jab, and so has my wife, but my daughter, who’s under 18, has not, because Nepal hasn’t offered them to that age group yet, but she still has to go to school this week to take exams. My parents in Canada, who are over 80, have had two jabs, and now they’re talking about a booster shot. And on it goes.

    But here in Nepal only 20% of people are fully vaccinated and 22% partly vaccinated. More doses are reportedly on the way, and this week’s news that neighbouring India will start exporting vaccines in October is encouraging, but it’s going to be months, at least, before the population approaches a vaccination rate where we can start to relax. 

    In the meantime, masks are the answer. Today we’re speaking with Preeti Adhikary of the NORMmask project. You may have heard about its work in Bangladesh, where it was launched in 2020. The project is now also rolling out in Pakistan, India and Latin America. 

    One note: in one of my questions today you’ll hear me refer to the results from Bangladesh as a 300% increase in mask wearing. In fact, the rise was three-fold, which I assumed was the same as 300% but is actually 200%. Now you know why I chose to study liberal arts after graduating high school….

    Thank you for downloading this episode — we’d really like to hear what you thought of it, so once you’re done, please leave a review at Apple Podcasts.

    Resources

    NORM website
    Covid-19 Rapid Action Taskforce Nepal

    Nepal Now social links
    Facebook
    Instagram
    Twitter
    LinkedIn
    Thanks as always to Nikunja Nepal for advice and inspiration.
    Music: amaretto needs ice ... by urmymuse (c) copyright 2018 Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution Noncommercial  (3.0) license.       http://dig.ccmixter.org/files/urmymuse/57996 Ft: Apoxode

    • 27 min
    New university taking liberal arts approach

    New university taking liberal arts approach

    Unfortunately, Nepal’s universities do not, in general, enjoy good reputations. Politicization is a main reason for that. But a new institution, University of Nepal, plans to avoid that pitfall by establishing itself as a public university, governed by a board of trustees.

    More importantly, says today’s guest and member of the development board, Dovan Rai, UoN will offer a liberal arts education. Graduates will be equipped to deal with a broad range of future challenges, not only those contained within their field of specialization.

    To be located in Nawalparasi district, in south-central Nepal, UoN could be opening its doors as soon as two years from now.

    You can let us know what you thought of our chat on Instagram, Facebook, Twitter or LinkedIn. We’re Nepal Now or Nepal Now pod. You can also write to me directly at marty@martylogan.net.

    If you’re not already subscribed to Nepal Now, why don’t you like, follow or favourite the show now wherever you’re listening to this. And if you think more people should hear the show, help spread the word by reviewing us on Apple Podcasts.

    Thank you to Suraya Logan for helping with Nepal Now’s social media. My name is Marty Logan. I produced this show and I’ll talk to you again soon.

    Resources
    University of Nepal
    Fundraising contact — bipin.adhikari@uon.edu.np

    Nepal Now social links
    Facebook
    Instagram
    Twitter
    LinkedIn
    Thanks as always to Nikunja Nepal for advice and inspiration.
    Music: amaretto needs ice ... by urmymuse (c) copyright 2018 Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution Noncommercial  (3.0) license.       http://dig.ccmixter.org/files/urmymuse/57996 Ft: Apoxode

    • 28 min
    A climate campaign for the Himalaya

    A climate campaign for the Himalaya

    Hi. This is Marty Logan. I wanted to let you know that I’m hosting a new podcast for IPS News. It’s called Strive: Toward a more just, sustainable world. It’s about people everywhere who are taking action to address climate change, racism, inequality and many other challenges we all face today. One thing that I think makes Strive different is we’ll be discussing solutions, not just adding to your burden by detailing the problems. Our first episode looked at how civil society in South Asia is leading a Covid mask-up campaign. On the next one we hear how a community currency can invigorate poor communities in Kenya that are often sidelined by the national economy. Please, look for Strive on your podcast player, or click on the link in the notes to this episode. OK, on to Nepal Now:
    From Oct 31st to Nov 12th this year the UN Climate Change Conference, COP26, will meet in Glasgow, Scotland. The COP, which is short for the conference of the parties—basically the nearly 200 governments that have signed the UN climate change treaty—has been meeting since 1994 to try to agree on limiting the production of greenhouse gases that contribute to the global warming that results in climate change.
    And still, after all those meetings, the best-case scenario for the eight Asian countries home to the Hindu-Kush Himalaya, including Nepal, is that one-third of the mountains’ glaciers will melt by the end of this century. The worst-case: 2/3 will disappear. This is not as simple as getting used to the absence of those massive rivers of ice: the glaciers are a key source of the water that nourishes 3 billion people, 1/3 of the world’s population, in Asia. And as we all know, water is essential for life.
    The International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development, or ICIMOD, has been informing the world about the impacts of climate change on the Hindu-Kush Himalaya, or HKH, for years. And of the impact on the 240 million people who live in the mountains, and of those 3 billion who rely on them for water. Today we’re speaking with Nanki Kaur, Regional Programme Manager, Adaptation and Resilience Building, about ICIMOD’s campaign ahead of COP26. It makes the case that more attention, and resources, must go to fighting the impacts of climate change in the HKH.
    If you enjoy what you heard, make sure that you follow, favourite or like Nepal Now on any podcast player so you don’t miss the next episode. We’re on Stitcher, iHeartRadio, Spotify, Google and Apple podcasts, and more. Between shows keep up with what we’re doing and chat with us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram: we’re Nepal Now or Nepal Now pod.
    Thank you to Suraya Logan for her work on Nepal Now’s social media. I’m Marty Logan. I produced this episode and I’ll talk to you again soon.
    Resources
    #HKH2Glasgow Campaign
    COP26
    Strive podcast
    Nepal Now social links
    Facebook
    Instagram
    Twitter
    LinkedIn
    Thanks as always to Nikunja Nepal for advice and inspiration.
    Music: amaretto needs ice ... by urmymuse (c) copyright 2018 Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution Noncommercial  (3.0) license.       http://dig.ccmixter.org/files/urmymuse/57996 Ft: Apoxode

    • 32 min
    We're all online—But who's in control?

    We're all online—But who's in control?

    Nepalis are online. Full stop. We can no longer say that Nepalis in cities are online, or that educated Nepalis are online. In a 2020 survey, 89% of Nepalis said that they used Facebook. 62% of the mobile phones that people carried around were smartphones, and the figure was growing. The Covid-19 pandemic has surely caused it to rise further. 
    This has huge implications for many aspects of people’s lives. In this episode I talk about a number of those with Shubha Kayastha of Body & Data. Do people know who’s watching them when they’re online? Or who is able to watch them? Do they know what steps they can take to find out? Is Big Tech really trying to make it easier for you to protect your privacy online? What about the government?
    We discuss how women, queer people and members of other marginalized groups are trolled and bullied. Hint: it’s got a lot to do with power distribution, and echoes what happens in the physical world. 
    I really enjoyed this chat—it made me think about some pretty basic things in very different ways. I guess that’s why this episode is a bit longer than usual, but take the extra time if you can—it’s worth it. 
    If you like what you heard, please give us a rating on Apple Podcasts. Or buy us a coffee, by clicking on the link under Resources. Keep up with the show between episodes on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook and LinkedIn. We’re Nepal Now or Nepal Now pod. You can send me your feedback, ideas or just say hi, at marty@martylogan.net. 
    Thank you to Suraya Logan, for her work on the show’s social media. I’m Marty Logan. I produced this episode and will talk to you again soon. 
    Resources
    Body & Data
    Buy Nepal Now a coffee
    Nepal Now social links
    Facebook
    Instagram
    Twitter
    LinkedIn
    Thanks as always to Nikunja Nepal for advice and inspiration.
    Music: amaretto needs ice ... by urmymuse (c) copyright 2018 Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution Noncommercial  (3.0) license.       http://dig.ccmixter.org/files/urmymuse/57996 Ft: Apoxode
    --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/nepalnow/message

    • 39 min

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