100 episodes

Podcasts with Authors about their New Books

New Books Network Marshall Poe

    • News
    • 4.3 • 90 Ratings

Podcasts with Authors about their New Books

    Soraya de Chadarevian, "Heredity Under the Microscope: Chromosomes and the Study of the Human Genome" (U Chicago Press, 2020)

    Soraya de Chadarevian, "Heredity Under the Microscope: Chromosomes and the Study of the Human Genome" (U Chicago Press, 2020)

    “What are chromosomes? And what does it mean to treat them as visual objects?” asks Soraya de Chadarevian in her new book, Heredity Under the Microscope: Chromosomes and the Study of the Human Genome (University of Chicago Press, 2020). Considering this question as she follows the history of microscope-based practices in chromosomal research across a variety of contexts—from the medical clinic to the study of human variation—de Chadarevian offers readers a new history of postwar human genetics. This approach enables her to argue that cytogenetics was far from just “old fashioned biology that was eventually superseded by molecular approaches” and to show the continuities and interdependencies between different methods for studying our DNA.
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    • 52 min
    Jim Mason, "An Unnatural Order: The Roots of Our Destruction of Nature" (Latern Books, 2002)

    Jim Mason, "An Unnatural Order: The Roots of Our Destruction of Nature" (Latern Books, 2002)

    First published by Simon & Schuster in 1993 and then by Continuum in 1998, Jim Mason’s An Unnatural Order: The Roots of Our Destruction of Nature has become a classic. With a new Lantern edition expected in early 2021, the book explores, from an anthropological, sociocultural, and holistic perspective, how and why we have cut ourselves off from other animals and the natural world, and the toll this has taken on our consciousness, our ability to steward nature wisely, and the will to control our own tendencies.
    Jim Mason writes: “My own view is that the primal worldview, updated by a scientific understanding of the living world, offers the best hope for a human spirituality. Life on earth is the miracle, the sacred. The dynamic living world is the creator, the First Being, the sustainer, and the final resting place for all living beings—humans included. We humans evolved with other living beings; their lives informed our lives. They provided models for our existence; they shaped our minds and culture. With dominionism out of the way, we could enjoy a deep sense of kinship with the other animals, which would give us a deep sense of belonging to our living world.
    “Then, once again, we could feel for this world. We could feel included in the awesome family of living beings. We could feel our continuum with the living world. We could, once again, feel a genuine sense of the sacred in the world.”
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    • 1 hr 27 min
    Victoria Phillips, "Martha Graham's Cold War: The Dance of American Diplomacy" (Oxford UP, 2019)

    Victoria Phillips, "Martha Graham's Cold War: The Dance of American Diplomacy" (Oxford UP, 2019)

    Dr. Victoria Phillips adeptly tells the story of Martha Graham's role as diplomat, arts innovator, and dancer. Her book Martha Graham's Cold War: The Dance of American Diplomacy (Oxford UP, 2019) is a look at the years that her company toured the world as an example of American democracy and freedom. Martha Graham's Cold War frames the story of Martha Graham and her particular brand of dance modernism as pro-Western Cold War propaganda used by the United States government to promote American democracy. Representing every seated president from Dwight D. Eisenhower through Ronald Reagan, Graham performed politics in the global field for over thirty years. This fascinating story takes you through the world of Martha Graham and her famous dancer as they circle the globe promoting American values and artistic ingenuity.
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    • 52 min
    S. Burrows and G. Roe, "Digitizing Enlightenment: Digital Humanities and the Transformation of 18th-Century Studies" (Liverpool UP, 2020)

    S. Burrows and G. Roe, "Digitizing Enlightenment: Digital Humanities and the Transformation of 18th-Century Studies" (Liverpool UP, 2020)

    Digitizing Enlightenment: Digital Humanities and the Transformation of 18th-Century Studies (Liverpool UP, 2020) explores how a set of inter-related digital projects are transforming our vision of the Enlightenment. The featured projects are some of the best known, well-funded and longest established research initiatives in the emerging area of ‘digital humanities’, a field that has, particularly since 2010, been attracting a rising tide of interest from professional academics, the media, funding councils, and the general public worldwide. Advocates and practitioners of the digital humanities argue that computational methods can fundamentally transform our ability to answer some of the ‘big questions’ that drive humanities research, allowing us to see patterns and relationships that were hitherto hard to discern, and to pinpoint, visualise, and analyse relevant data in efficient and powerful new ways.
    In the book’s opening section, leading scholars outline their own projects’ institutional and intellectual histories, the techniques and methodologies they specifically developed, the sometimes-painful lessons learned in the process, future trajectories for their research, and how their findings are revising previous understandings. A second section features chapters from early career scholars working at the intersection of digital methods and Enlightenment studies, an intellectual space largely forged by the projects featured in part one.
    Highlighting current and future research methods and directions for digital eighteenth-century studies, the book offers a monument to the current state of digital work, an overview of current findings, and a vision statement for future research.
    Simon Burrows is a Professor of History and Digital Humanities at Western Sydney University, Australia, where he is Leader of the Digital Humanities Research Group.
    Glenn Roe is Professor of French Literature and Digital Humanities in the Faculty of Letters at Sorbonne University, where he teaches into the UFR of French and Comparative Literature and is attached to the Centre d’étude de la langue et des littératures françaises (CELLF UMR 8599) and the LabEx OBVIL.
    Dr Alexandra Ortolja-Baird is a visiting researcher at the British Museum and teaches Digital Humanities at University College London.
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    • 1 hr 21 min
    Justin Gage, "We Do Not Want the Gates Closed Between Us: Native Networks and the Spread of the Ghost Dance" (U Oklahoma Press, 2020)

    Justin Gage, "We Do Not Want the Gates Closed Between Us: Native Networks and the Spread of the Ghost Dance" (U Oklahoma Press, 2020)

    Writing to U.S. President Grover Cleveland in 1888, Oglala Lakota leaders Little Wound, Young Man Afraid of His Horses, and Red Cloud insisted upon a simple yet significant demand to allow western Indigenous nations to retain intertribal communication networks, stating that "we do not want the gates closed between us." These vast networks - and the written letters, in-person visits, and anticolonial ideologies that sustained them - are the focus of historian Justin Gage's new book, We Do Not Want the Gates Closed Between Us: Native Networks and the Spread of the Ghost Dance (University of Oklahoma Press, 2020). Gage shows how sustained communication between reservations enabled a diversity of peoples to share knowledge of common experiences under U.S. settler colonialism, culminating with the rise and rapid spread of the Ghost Dance.
    Focusing on extensive correspondence between Indigenous communities at over thirty western reservations, Gage elevates the voices of Indigenous leaders, diplomats, family members, and others who sought to use English literacy, one of the United States' primary tools of assimilation, to resist confinement within colonial boundaries. The result is an essential study of how the U.S. federal government struggled and ultimately failed to limit Indigenous mobility and the powerful intellectual currents that helped Indigenous nations to assert their autonomy and sovereignty at the turn of the century.
    Annabel LaBrecque is a PhD student in the Department of History at UC Berkeley. You can find her on Twitter @labrcq.
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    • 1 hr 5 min
    Lamont Lindstrom, "Tanna Times: Islanders in the World" (U Hawaii Press, 2021)

    Lamont Lindstrom, "Tanna Times: Islanders in the World" (U Hawaii Press, 2021)

    For four decades, Lamont "Monty" Lindstrom has conducted research on the island of Tanna in the Pacific nation of Vanuatu. Considered by outsiders to be incredibly exotic, Tanna attracts tourists who come to see its active volcano, cargo cults, and customary practices. Lindstrom presents a different vision of Tanna in his new book, Tanna Times: Islanders in the World (University of Hawai‘i Press, 2020), showing us us how Tanna's cultural distinctiveness is part of its entanglement in larger processes of globalisation and colonisalism. This short, readable volume describes the history and culture of Tanna through the stories of fourteen unique individuals whose lives exemplify the island's history and culture. This book is valuable because it is a short, accessible, introduction to both Tanna and Vanuatu, written by someone with a lifetime's worth of expertise on the topic -- definitely a change from the vulgar adventure stories which have been published about the country. Best of all, Tanna Times is available for free as an open access download from University of Hawaii Press, which published the book as part of the Sustainable History Monograph Pilot program. The result is a unique and readable text perfect for anyone visiting Vanuatu, or for classroom use.
    In this episode of the podcast, Monty Lindstrom and host Alex Golub talk about cargo cults, protestant missionaries, sustainable tourism, and Austronesian cultural connections between Tanna and Hawai‘i. They discuss Monty's long-term fieldwork and a topic that is rarely covered: while many people talk about how to write your first book, few people discuss what it's like to write a book which might be your last. 
    Lamont Lindstrom is Kendall Professor of Anthropology at the University of Tulsa. His previous books include Across the World with the Johnsons: Visual Culture and Empire in the Twentieth Century, Bik Wok: Storian Blo Wol Wo Tu long Vanuatu, Chiefs Today: Traditional Pacific Leadership and the Postcolonial State, and Cargo Cult: Strange Stories of Desire from Melanesia and Beyond. 
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    • 55 min

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5
90 Ratings

90 Ratings

Bo Carlson ,

Wonderful Idea!

I can’t believe I’ve only just now stumbled upon this podcast! I’ve always wanted to read more, but it can be hard to find time to get through a whole book with so many other obligations. Now I can get introduced to new books while walking outside or while I’m commuting. The number of episodes y’all put out every day is remarkable!

Unfortunately I do have to agree with other commenters that the audio quality is unreliable, and some of the interviewers will either cut off the speaker or not ask the right questions. I hope this will improve over time; it’s such a great concept.

dkd84 ,

Great content!

I’ve listened to several channels for a couple of years now, and I’ve learned a lot. As a busy academic, I appreciate the opportunity to hear about new books that I may not have time to read. The usual length is about 45 minutes, which allows for the author to go into the book’s main arguments in some detail. The audio quality does vary somewhat, but I’ve noticed that it’s improved over the years. Find a channel or two that fit your interests and give it a listen!

dacrow1 ,

Allows the expert to talk

Every interview allows an expert to talk about what they know, at length, with just a few questions to keep it going. Totally different from most other podcasts, where the host dominates the conversation. You can learn a lot. If you find the sound quality for one interview is poor or the subject too narrow, just move on to the next one. There are hundreds, many first rate.

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