6 episodes

If you want to understand what’s wrong with our public schools, you have to look at what is arguably the most powerful force in shaping them: white parents. A five-part series from the makers of Serial and The New York Times. Hosted by Chana Joffe-Walt.

Nice White Parents The New York Times

    • Society & Culture
    • 3.8 • 23.4K Ratings

If you want to understand what’s wrong with our public schools, you have to look at what is arguably the most powerful force in shaping them: white parents. A five-part series from the makers of Serial and The New York Times. Hosted by Chana Joffe-Walt.

    5: ‘We Know It When We See It’

    5: ‘We Know It When We See It’

    An unexpected last chapter. Some white parents start behaving differently.

    • 52 min
    4: 'Here’s Another Fun Thing You Can Do'

    4: 'Here’s Another Fun Thing You Can Do'

    Is it possible to limit the power of white parents?

    • 48 min
    3: ‘This Is Our School, How Dare You?’

    3: ‘This Is Our School, How Dare You?’

    We saw what happens when white families come into the school. What happens when they stay out?

    • 45 min
    2: 'I Still Believe in It'

    2: 'I Still Believe in It'

    White parents in the 1960s fought to be part of a new, racially integrated school. Where’d they go?

    • 51 min
    1: The Book of Statuses

    1: The Book of Statuses

    A group of parents take one big step together.

    • 1 hr
    Introducing: Nice White Parents

    Introducing: Nice White Parents

    A new limited series about building a better school system, and what gets in the way.

    • 2 min

Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5
23.4K Ratings

23.4K Ratings

PJ943 ,

Nice white reactions

If your review of this podcast cites these factors:

A) poverty in a school’s neighborhood
B) family dynamics in a school’s neighborhood which are associated with
C) the majority races in a school’s neighborhood
D) the “good intentions” of the white parents in this series
E) test scores, grades or achievements of the students in a high school
F) how “good” a school is

contextualized by your own white opinion on what these things mean, using your immediate emotions, reactions, and thoughts

as justification,

You didn’t listen to this podcast. You reacted to it.

These are not valid points of review for a series which seeks to examine all of the definitions of the very things we white community members take for granted about our educational community every day, and the conclusions are worth scrutinizing — at a level deeper than “my school was good because blah blah blah…”

Listen to it again.

Myske ,

This podcast is racist.

Shocked that Apple would allow a racist anti-white podcast to be featured in its podcast app. I knew the times had gone down this road, but Apple seemed more responsible.

The title doesn’t say it’s just some white parents from half a century ago It’s just “white parents.” Imagine if in response to black gangs killing people I had a podcast called “nice black people” and the description said something like “want to know why the streets aren’t safe? It’s black people.” This is no different.

Apple, you are promoting racism. Do better.

Bernoulli71 ,

Makes good observations but goes overboard on race factors

The biggest predictor of a child’s educational success is parental income, not race. Of course race plays into so many things in our culture, including public schooling, and this series fleshes out some worthy observations of that. Economic class trumps it all however and yet it is only given a few sidebar mentions. A podcast needs subscribers though and focusing on “Nice White Parents” instead of “Nice Upper Middle Class Parents” makes it provocative and and gets more clicks. This podcast goes double down on our society’s current system of race relations: it’s ok to examine white behavior critically, and even poke fun at white people a bit, but it’s taboo to do the same of any other race, even if the evidence is there. With that limited racial approach it misses it’s mark to make change.

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