62 episodes

Engaging the brightest minds working to solve one of the world's toughest challenges—child abuse. Join us for conversations with leading experts on science, law, medicine, morality, and messaging. This podcast is brought to you by National Children's Alliance, the largest network of care centers in the U.S. serving child victims of abuse. Visit us online at nationalchildrensalliance.org.

One in Ten National Children's Alliance

    • Science
    • 4.8 • 21 Ratings

Engaging the brightest minds working to solve one of the world's toughest challenges—child abuse. Join us for conversations with leading experts on science, law, medicine, morality, and messaging. This podcast is brought to you by National Children's Alliance, the largest network of care centers in the U.S. serving child victims of abuse. Visit us online at nationalchildrensalliance.org.

    Beyond Pride: Can Kids Trust Us When They Tell Us Who They Are?

    Beyond Pride: Can Kids Trust Us When They Tell Us Who They Are?

    This is a critical time for the child protection and Children’s Advocacy Center community to be allies for LGBTQ kids. Nearly two dozen states have considered anti-trans bills and some have made it difficult if not impossible for trans youth to receive gender-affirming care. In today’s One in Ten podcast, we speak with Al Killen-Harvey, president and co-founder of the Harvey Institute, about how child abuse professionals can better support LGBTQ youth and families. How can we ensure that child abuse investigations aren’t politicized? How can we identify and overcome our own biases and lack of knowledge to provide better care for these kids and their families? And how do we open our own hearts to create a welcoming and inclusive community where all kids can thrive?
    Topics in this episode:
    Origin story (1:46)How welcoming is our field for LGBTQ kids and families? (6:30)Advice for child abuse professionals (10:54)Mental health impact of anti-trans legislation (14:53)Gender-affirming care (19:49)The sense of threat and anger (27:37)Risks to trans youth (35:57)What can child abuse professionals do? (37:25)Be a life raft for kids (44:34)For more information (47:27)Links:
    Al Killen-Harvey, LCSW, is the president and co-founder of the Harvey Institute
    Heidi Stern-Ellis, LCSW
    Chadwick Center for Children and Families at Rady Children’s Hospital in San Diego
    CAC, Children’s Advocacy Center
    CPS, child protective services
    For more information about National Children’s Alliance and the work of Children’s Advocacy Centers, visit our website at NationalChildrensAlliance.org. Or visit our podcast website at OneInTenPodcast.org. And join us on Facebook at One in Ten podcast.
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    • 47 min
    The Limits of ACEs, Live Panel Discussion

    The Limits of ACEs, Live Panel Discussion

    The 1998 CDC-Kaiser Permanente Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) Study helped build public understanding of the consequences of untreated childhood trauma. All these years later, does this tool tell the complete story? In this panel discussion recorded at National Children’s Alliance’s 2022 Leadership Conference, we explore what ACEs can—and can’t—accomplish in terms of influencing public support for policies that benefit kids. How can ACE screenings be used (and misused)? And what’s next for public health messaging that matters. Join Dr. Ernestine Briggs-King and Dr. Jonathan Purtle for a panel discussion moderated by NCA CEO Teresa Huizar in our first live-to-tape episode of One in Ten. 
    Topics in this episode: 
    Origin stories (2:07)What’s good and bad about ACEs (5:39)Public policy messaging (14:15)ACEs and racism (22:42)Protective factors and resilience (24:58)The six messages (29:08)What we’re curious about (36:48)Audience questions (39:54)Links: 
    Ernestine Briggs-King, Ph.D., is a clinical/community psychologist; the director of research at the Center for Child and Family Health; director of the Data and Evaluation Program at the UCLA-Duke University National Center for Child Traumatic Stress; and an associate professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Duke University School of Medicine 
    Jonathan Purtle, Ph.D., is associate professor of public health policy and management and director of policy research at NYU’s Global Center for Implementation Science 
    CDC-Kaiser Permanente Adverse Childhood Experiences Study (1998), Vincent J. Felitti, MD, FACP; et al 
    Previous episodes on related topics: 
    “Reframing Childhood Adversity,” with Julie Sweetland from FrameWorks Institute (April 14, 2022); includes a link to the “Reframing” study
    “Greater Than the Sum—Multiple Adversities in Children’s Lives,” with Dr. Sherry Hamby (August 6, 2020; originally broadcast February 14, 2020, as “Mending the Tears of Violence”) 
    “The ACEs Message and Its Unintended Consequences,” with Dr. Jonathan Purtle (May 20, 2021) 
    “The Hidden Cost of Resilience,” with Dr. Ernestine Briggs-King (July 17, 2020; originally broadcast January 10, 2020) 
    “Bonus Content: Universal Screening for Adverse Childhood Experiences,” with Dr. David Finkelhor (May 21, 2020) 
    “Beyond ACEs,” with Dr. Lisa Amaya-Jackson (December 4, 2019) 
    “The Science of Storytelling,” with Nat Kendall-Taylor from FrameWorks Institute (June 28, 2019) 
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    • 52 min
    Collateral Damage: Kids and the Internet Privacy Wars

    Collateral Damage: Kids and the Internet Privacy Wars

    Justin Fitzsimmons, associate vice president at the National White Collar Crime Center, joins us to raise the alarm about the way in which technology companies, social media outlets, and online privacy advocates are now purposely pitting adult privacy rights against the protection and safety of children. Think end-to-end encryption is totally innocuous? What if that means that pedophiles can endlessly trade child sexual abuse images online with impunity? And how do we—as advocates for children—keep issues of child protection front and center for policy makers, for tech and social media, and ultimately for all Americans?
    Topics in this episode:
    Origin story (1:43)Trends in technology-facilitated crime (2:45)The privacy problem (6:56)Our tech-driven lives (14:22)What law enforcement needs (18:55)What parents need to know (27:17)What child abuse professionals need to do (34:23)Don’t let technology scare you (41:40)For more information (45:52)Links:
    Justin Fitzsimmons is associate vice president at the National White Collar Crime Center (nw3c.org), former president of the Board of Directors at National Children’s Alliance, and an expert on technology-facilitated crime.
    CACs: Children’s Advocacy Centers
    CSAM: child sexual abuse materials
    ICAC: Internet Crimes Against Children Task Force Program
    New York Times articles “The Internet Is Overrun with Images of Child Sexual Abuse. What Went Wrong?,” “How Laws Against Child Sexual Abuse Imagery Can Make It Harder to Detect,” and “Tech Companies Detect a Surge in Online Videos of Child Sexual Abuse”
    NCMEC: National Center for Missing and Exploited Children
    NDAA: National District Attorneys Association
    Common Sense Media
    The Connected Parent
    HealthyChildren.org
    See also our previous episode, “Predators in Our Pockets: The New Digital Hunting Grounds”
    For more information about National Children’s Alliance and the work of Children’s Advocacy Centers, visit our website at NationalChildrensAlliance.org. Or visit our podcast website at OneInTenPodcast.org. And join us on Facebook at One in Ten podcast.
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    • 46 min
    The Fear of False Allegations

    The Fear of False Allegations

    If you’ve ever worked anywhere near the criminal justice system, you know how heartbreaking it is when a case goes to trial and you have a clear disclosure and great victim testimony and really solid corroborating evidence—and the jury acquits. In a child sexual abuse case, what would make a jury hear all of that and still acquit? Tayler Jones-Cieminski and other researchers set out to explore that very question, especially one specific aspect of juror beliefs: the myth about the prevalence of false allegations. What would happen at trial if there were an increased fear of false allegations? And does gender have anything to do with it? 
    Topics in this episode:
    Origin story (3:05)Disparity between evidence and verdict (7:17)Fear of false allegations (11:49)Implications for criminal justice system (24:32)Role for juror education, public education (28:33)Advice for child abuse professionals (31:30)Future research (34:41)Sharing the credit (38:40)For more information (40:35)Links:
    Tayler Jones-Cieminski is a doctoral student at the University of Illinois at Chicago 
    “Jurors’ Gender and Their Fear of False Child Sexual Abuse Accusations Are Related to Their Belief in Child Victims’ Allegations.” Tayler M. Jones, Bette L. Bottoms, Kajal Sachdev, Jonathan Aniciete, and Karis Gorak (2021): Journal of Child Sexual Abuse, DOI: 10.1080/10538712.2021.1931612
    Bette Bottoms, Ph.D. 
    OJJDP, the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention
    Tamara Haegerich, Ph.D.  
    Kari Nysse-Carris, Ph.D.
    “How Accurate Is Our Memory After 20 Years?” is our interview with Gail Goodman 
    Thomas D. Lyon, Ph.D. 
    Michael E. Lamb, Ph.D.
    Jonathan Golding, Ph.D. 
    Voir dire 
    “Child victim empathy mediates the influence of jurors’ sexual abuse experiences on child sexual abuse case judgments: Meta-analyses.” Tayler M. Jones; Bette L. Bottoms; and Margaret C. Stevenson. (2020). Psychology, Public Policy, and Law, 26(3), 312–332. DOI: 10.1037/law0000231  Also available from the University of Evansville.
    For more information about National Children’s Alliance and the work of Children’s Advocacy Centers, visit our website at NationalChildrensAlliance.org. Or visit our podcast website at OneInTenPodcast.org. And join us on Facebook at One in Ten podcast.
    Support the show

    • 41 min
    Exploring the Memoir of a Stolen Boyhood with Author Stephen Mills

    Exploring the Memoir of a Stolen Boyhood with Author Stephen Mills

    Today’s episode is a conversation with author and survivor Stephen Mills about his recently published memoir, Chosen. For those who haven’t yet read his book, which we highly recommend, it recounts Mills’ abuse at the hands of a camp counselor over several years, and his long journey towards healing. While many institutional abuse cases involve boys, there are very, very few published accounts of male survivorship. And, if we’re to help boys who have been abused, then it’s critical for us to understand how this experience may differ from that of female survivorship. Mills’ account is deeply moving, and it challenges all of us to better protect boys in the first place, and better help them heal if they have been abused.
    Topics in this episode:
    Why we need this story (1:17)Stigma and shame (3:42)Grooming family and community (6:50)Longing for justice (17:34)Pushing institutions to change (26:17)Public policy wishes (29:45)Advice for child abuse professionals (34:39)Learn signs and tactics (41:46)For more information (47:01)Links:
    Stephen Mills is the coauthor with Roger Fouts of Next of Kin: My Conversations with Chimpanzees. He has advised and written for an array of public interest organizations in the fields of human rights, civil liberties, and the environment. Since 1983, he has worked with the Natural Resources Defense Council, building campaigns that have mobilized millions of people in support of environmental protection, and he serves as an ambassador for CHILD USA.
    StephenMillsAuthor.com includes resources for survivors, families, and everyone and information on ways to take action to prevent child sexual abuse
    “At a Place Where He Was Supposed to Be Safe, He Was Molested,” by Bruce Feiler, The New York Times, April 26, 2022
    Other memoirs mentioned: Notes on a Silencing by Lacy Crawford; Half the House: A Memoir by Richard Hoffman; and The Tricky Part: One Boy’s Fall from Trespass into Grace by Martin Moran
    Child Victims Act of 2019 (New York)
    CHILD USA has information on child protection laws across the country, including statutes of limitation reform
    U.S. National Blueprint to End Sexual Violence Against Children and Adolescents from Keep Kids Safe
    For more information about National Children’s Alliance and the work of Children’s Advocacy Centers, visit our website at NationalChildrensAlliance.org. Or visit our podcast website at OneInTenPodcast.org. And join us on Facebook at One in Ten podcast.
    Support the show (https://www.nationalchildrensalliance.org/donate-now/)

    • 47 min
    Reframing Childhood Adversity

    Reframing Childhood Adversity

    April is Child Abuse Prevention Month, a great time to talk about the way we message around child abuse and childhood adversities. The ways in which we’ve messaged about childhood adversity in the past may have served us very well, helping people come to terms with how important the topic is, the scope of the problem, and the lifelong impacts of it. But they may not be serving us very well now. 
    What if, in describing the problem as enormous and making that the centerpiece of our messaging, we’re making people think that the problem is intractable and they’re powerless as an individual person to make a change? Or, in focusing on the stories of individual families in order to gain empathy for them, what we really seem to be implying to the public is that there’s no room for public policy solutions, that this is a matter for each family to solve by themselves. We talked to Julie Sweetland, senior advisor at the FrameWorks Institute, about how to reframe childhood adversity.
    Topics in this episode:
    Origin story (2:21)Common communication traps (6:15)Threat of modernity (14:28)Key recommendations (19:09)Systemic racism (32:16)Hope and resilience (35:45)Collective responsibility (39:55)Evidence-based communication (42:00)For more information (43:52)Links:
    Julie Sweetland, Ph.D., is a sociolinguist and senior advisor at the FrameWorks Institute.
    ACEs: adverse childhood experiences
     “Reframing Childhood Adversity: Promoting Upstream Approaches,” by Julie Sweetland, FrameWorks Institute (February 16, 2021); a presentation of the report is also available on the FrameWorks site
    Harvard University Center on the Developing Child
    National Scientific Council on the Developing Child
    Prevent Child Abuse America
    Social Current
    CDC: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
    Zero to Three
    Ascend at the Aspen Institute
    Building Better Childhoods
    For more information about National Children’s Alliance and the work of Children’s Advocacy Centers, visit our website at NationalChildrensAlliance.org. Or visit our podcast website at OneInTenPodcast.org. And join us on Facebook at One in Ten podcast.
    Support the show

    • 44 min

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
21 Ratings

21 Ratings

eworldpeace ,

Great podcast for Child Welfare professionals

Great topics and very timely. I love the pace of the host too

JID1946 ,

Outstanding episode on child trafficking

I often hear students speak to “child prostitution” the benefits of legal prostitution and worst of all, prostitution as a “victimless crime.”

I plan to use the episode as a lesson on the problems and issues. My university tends to neglect victimology as a criminal justice perspective.

Well done.

Klrtg ,

Very informative - but where is the 11th episode?

At the end of episode 10 it says there is going to be another episode (with Dr. Amaya Jackson), is there a plan to actually publish that episode or any additional ones?

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