15 episodes

Welcome to Phronesis, a show dedicated to issues in political philosophy. Each episode will take a close look at important essays and ideas in political and social thought—linking them to historical and contemporary debates. Which is to say, finding where they are discussed in the footnotes to Plato. Presented by William Lombardo and Bradley Davis.

Phronesis Athwart

    • Politics
    • 5.0 • 7 Ratings

Welcome to Phronesis, a show dedicated to issues in political philosophy. Each episode will take a close look at important essays and ideas in political and social thought—linking them to historical and contemporary debates. Which is to say, finding where they are discussed in the footnotes to Plato. Presented by William Lombardo and Bradley Davis.

    Benjamin Fondane, "Man Before History"

    Benjamin Fondane, "Man Before History"

    Episode Notes
    In this episode we discuss Benjamin Fondane's essay "Man Before History: The Sound and the Fury" available in the volume Existential Monday. We are joined by Aaron Cummings, a PhD student in the History of Ideas at the University of Texas at Dallas, who previously wrote on Fondane for Athwart.

    If you liked this episode, please leave us a review! If you have any questions or comments, feel free to reach out to us on our website. Or, if you would like to read and listen to more of our work, go to www.athwart.org.

    Image: painting of MacBeth Act I, Season 3 by Samuel John Egbert Jones via Wikimedia Commons.

    Music courtesy of yn00001 via Musopen

    • 1 hr 15 min
    The Genealogy of Morals and Warspeak

    The Genealogy of Morals and Warspeak

    Episode Notes
    In this episode, we are joined by St. John's College Tutor Michael Grenke to discuss Lise van Boxel's Warspeak: Nietzsche’s Victory over Nihilism and Friedrich Nietzsche's Genealogy of Morals. Lise van Boxel's Warspeak, with an introduction from Grenke, is available from Political Animal Press.

    If you liked this episode, please leave us a review! If you have any questions or comments, feel free to reach out to us on our website. Or, if you would like to read and listen to more of our work, go to www.athwart.org.

    Image courtesy of guille pozzi via Unsplash.

    Music, The Prelude to Act I of Parsifal by Richard Wagner, conducted by Karl Much at the 1927 Beyreuth Festival via Wikimedia Commons

    • 1 hr 4 min
    Gilles Deleuze, "Postscript on the Societies of Control"

    Gilles Deleuze, "Postscript on the Societies of Control"

    Episode Notes
    In this episode, we discuss Gilles Deleuze's "Postscript on the Societies of Control." We were joined by special guest Geoff Shullenberger, who writes at Outsider Theory among other outlets—including Athwart. Additionally, Geoff recently launched an Outsider Theory podcast.

    If you liked this episode, please leave us a review! If you have any questions or comments, feel free to reach out to us on our website. Or, if you would like to read and listen to more of our work, go to www.athwart.org.

    Image of Presidio Modelo in Cuba courtesy of Friman via Wikimedia Commons.

    Music courtesy of yn00001 via Musopen.

    • 1 hr 27 min
    Leo Strauss, "Religion and the Commonweal"

    Leo Strauss, "Religion and the Commonweal"

    Episode Notes
    For this episode, we are joined by Samuel Goldman, Associate Professor of Political Science at George Washington University, executive director of the John L. Loeb, Jr. Institute for Religious Freedom, and director of the Politics & Values Program. Professor Goldman's book After Nationalism:
    Being American in an Age of Division is forthcoming this year.

    We discussed Leo Strauss's lecture "Religion and the Commonweal in the Tradition of Political Philosophy," recently published in American Political Thought.

    If you liked this episode, please leave us a review! If you have any questions or comments, feel free to reach out to us on our website. Or, if you would like to read and listen to more of our work, go to www.athwart.org.

    Image by Crystal Huff via Unsplash.

    Music courtesy of yn00001 via Musopen

    • 1 hr 25 min
    Walter Benjamin, "The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction"

    Walter Benjamin, "The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction"

    Episode Notes
    In this episode, we discuss Walter Benjamin's "The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction" with special guest Max Nussenbaum of the On Deck Writer Fellowship.

    The On Deck Writer Fellowship is an eight-week remote program for internet writers who want to improve their writing and grow an audience.

    The On Deck Writer Fellowship will be hosting "Drafted," a day-long writing & learning event on March 22, 2021 at 11 am EST. Hear from amazing speakers, meet other incredible writers, and learn how writing can accelerate your career online. Register for free.

    On Deck is currently offering special early-bird pricing of $1,990 for our third cohort, which kicks off April 17. Apply here.

    If you liked this episode, please leave us a review! If you have any questions or comments, feel free to reach out to us on our website. Or, if you would like to read and listen to more of our work, go to www.athwart.org.

    Image by Jeremy Yap via Unsplash.
    Music courtesy of yn00001 via Musopen

    Note: This episode of Phronesis is sponsored by On Deck.

    Dorothy Sayers, "The Lost Tools of Learning"

    Dorothy Sayers, "The Lost Tools of Learning"

    Episode Notes
    In this episode, we discuss Dorothy Sayer's "The Lost Tools of Learning." We are joined by Micah Meadowcroft, Managing Editor at The American Conservative. You can find his writing on TAC's website.

    If you liked this episode, please leave us a review! If you have any questions or comments, feel free to reach out to us on our website. Or, if you would like to read and listen to more of our work, go to www.athwart.org.

    Image courtesy of Jeffrey Hamilton via Unsplash

    Music courtesy of yn00001 via Musopen

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
7 Ratings

7 Ratings

taylorsee2020 ,

Excited for the future of this podcast

Came across this when I searched Adam Vermeule’s name & stumbled upon these guys. Great thinking & can’t wait to see where this all goes

Callicles' stepdad ,

Stellar discussions on stellar texts

Phenomenal selection of essays so far. Bold discussions. Give it a listen!! Heres 4 interrelated suggestions for the hosts: 1) stick closer to the texts themselves. This might ground the conversations and prevent them from wandering too far afield/becoming too reflective 2) summarize the text’s context, direction and main arguments more clearly at the beginning of the discussion to give listeners who haven’t read it a better idea of what’s at stake. 3) tell us what you’ll be reading next so we can read along. 4) figure out your sound equipment! A fair deal of the Machiavelli episode was muted :( all that being said, thanks again for producing thoroughgoing conversations on worthy thinkers, keep it up!

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