113 episodes

Power Problems is a bi-weekly podcast from the Cato Institute. Host John Glaser offers a skeptical take on U.S. foreign policy, and discusses today’s big questions in international security with distinguished guests from across the political spectrum. Podcast Hashtag: #FPPowerProblems.
See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Power Problems Cato Institute

    • Government
    • 4.6 • 66 Ratings

Power Problems is a bi-weekly podcast from the Cato Institute. Host John Glaser offers a skeptical take on U.S. foreign policy, and discusses today’s big questions in international security with distinguished guests from across the political spectrum. Podcast Hashtag: #FPPowerProblems.
See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Oil & Great Power Politics

    Oil & Great Power Politics

    Access to oil is so vital that powerful countries can take extraordinary measures to protect themselves from ever being vulnerable to oil coercion. Rosemary A. Kelanic, Assistant Professor of Political Science at Notre Dame University, discusses the recent history of great powers’ quest for oil security and what kind of future military postures the United States and China may take toward the Persian Gulf.
     
    Rosemary A. Kelanic bioRosemary A. Kelanic, Black Gold and Blackmail: Oil and Great Power Politics, (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 2020).Rosemary A. Kelanic, “Why Iran’s ‘Oil Weapon’ Isn’t That Scary,” The Washington Post, June 18, 2019.
    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    • 42 min
    Bad Friends: America’s Middle East Allies

    Bad Friends: America’s Middle East Allies

    President Joe Biden claimed he would defend human rights around the world, but his track record paints a different picture, especially in the Middle East. Quincy Institute senior fellow Annelle Sheline discusses how U.S. policies in the region have protected oppressive leaders while undermining American interests.
    Show Notes
    Annelle Sheline bioAnnelle Sheline, “House Passes Measure Ending U.S. Support for Saudi War in Yemen,” Responsible Statecraft, September 23, 2021Annelle Sheline and Steven Simon, “Reset Overdue: Remaking U.S.-Saudi Relations,” Quincy Brief no. 6, October 2020
    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    • 38 min
    The Battle of Ideas over America's Role in the World

    The Battle of Ideas over America's Role in the World

    Stephen Wertheim is a senior fellow at the Carnegie Endowment for Peace. He discusses 20 years of failed post-9/11 national security policies, the strategy of global military dominance, and the ongoing the battle of ideas on the U.S. role in the world.
    Show Notes:
    Stephen Wertheim bioStephen Wertheim, “The Ever-Ready Answer for Failure in Afghanistan: More War,” The Washington Post, Stephen Wertheim, “Delusions of Dominance: Biden Can’t Restore American Primacy – And Shouldn’t Try,” Foreign Affairs, January 25, 2021.
    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    • 40 min
    A Distracted Grand Strategy

    A Distracted Grand Strategy

    U.S. Naval War College professor Peter Dombrowski argues that the most pressing problems Americans face are internal domestic challenges and non-military risks like pandemics and climate change. But national security policy devotes disproportionate time and resources to confronting inflated threats from external actors. He joins the show to discuss the problems with an overly militarized grand strategy that has failed to properly identify or prioritize threats.
     
    Show Notes
     
    Peter Dombrowski bioSimon Reich and Peter Dombrowski, The End of Grand Strategy: U.S. Maritime Operations in the Twenty-First Century (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 2018).Peter Dombrowski and Simon Reich, “Does Donald Trump Have a Grand Strategy?” International Affairs 93, no. 5, (September 2017): pp. 1013-1037.
    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    • 37 min
    Cutting Through the Noise on Afghanistan Withdrawal

    Cutting Through the Noise on Afghanistan Withdrawal

    The chaos that accompanied the U.S. military withdrawal from Afghanistan does not negate the wisdom of bringing the war to an end, despite protestations in Washington about U.S. credibility and the "sustainability" of endless war. Benjamin H. Friedman, policy director at Defense Priorities, weighs in. 
     
    Show Notes 
    Benjamin H. Friedman bioBenjamin H. Friedman, “Exiting Afghanistan: Ending America’s Longest War,” Defense Priorities, August 2019.
    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    • 38 min
    How to Actually End Endless Wars

    How to Actually End Endless Wars

    The now-popular "ending endless wars" slogan has generated more political rhetoric than real policy changes. David Sterman, senior policy analyst at New America, helps define the concept of "endless war" as a strategy based on unachievable objectives and offers practical policy solutions for a substantive shift away from the War on Terror. 
    Show Notes
    David Sterman bioDavid Sterman, “Defining Endless Wars: The First Step Towards Ending Them,” New America, January 26, 2021.Peter Bergen, David Sterman, and Melissa Salyk-Virk, “America’s Counterterrorism Wars: Tracking the United States’s Drone Strikes and Other Operations in Pakistan, Yemen, Somalia, and Libya,” New America, June 17, 2021.
    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    • 43 min

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5
66 Ratings

66 Ratings

BurCap ,

Great podcast

This is one of the best IR/foreign policy podcasts out there. I look forward to every episode.

SeminoleJack ,

This is great stuff!

Love all foreign policy and IR stuff but particularly the discussions on civil-military relations.

Otis Junior Nixon Jr. ,

This dude from Swarthmore is an idiot.

I can’t believe he’s a professor. He doesn’t know the first thing about Vietnam, Iran, Iraq or Afghanistan.

Top Podcasts In Government

You Might Also Like

More by Cato Institute