100 episodes

Power Station is a podcast about change making. We talk to nonprofit leaders about how they build community, advocate for policy change, and make an impact in overlooked and underinvested communities. Their stories and strategies don’t often make headlines but are often life changing. They may not be household names, but they probably should be.

There is no “one way” to support, build and engage communities. Power Station provides a platform for change makers to talk about their way. We look into the challenges nonprofits face in creating change and the barriers they sometimes create for themselves. And we get real about having a voice and using it well in the current political environment.

Why me? My 20+ years of experience in local and national nonprofits has taught me what it takes to sustain an organization and be of value to a community. I want to hear about how a well-honed infrastructure builds community, supports policy advocacy, and makes a meaningful impact.

Power Statio‪n‬ Anne Pasmanick

    • Government
    • 4.9 • 22 Ratings

Power Station is a podcast about change making. We talk to nonprofit leaders about how they build community, advocate for policy change, and make an impact in overlooked and underinvested communities. Their stories and strategies don’t often make headlines but are often life changing. They may not be household names, but they probably should be.

There is no “one way” to support, build and engage communities. Power Station provides a platform for change makers to talk about their way. We look into the challenges nonprofits face in creating change and the barriers they sometimes create for themselves. And we get real about having a voice and using it well in the current political environment.

Why me? My 20+ years of experience in local and national nonprofits has taught me what it takes to sustain an organization and be of value to a community. I want to hear about how a well-honed infrastructure builds community, supports policy advocacy, and makes a meaningful impact.

    Power Station with Lupi Quinteros-Grady

    Power Station with Lupi Quinteros-Grady

    How many of us can look back on a single foundational experience that shaped how we see ourselves? Lupi Quinteros-Grady can. She was 14 years old and an immigrant when she attended a program at Latin American Youth Center. She connected to a diverse group of young people and over time honed the confidence and skills needed to advocate on issues, including HIV, that directly affected the community. Years later, Lupi graduated from college, the first in her family to do so, and was offered a position at LAYC, managing the same program she once attended. She accepted and after 23 years of developing its holistic approach to academics, conservation, workforce development, housing and mental health, Lupi became LAYC’s CEO. She is now shifting programs and resources to meet the almost unimaginable needs generated by Covid19. LAYC has created new system to support families with food, emergency rental assistance and mental health counseling. And it intervenes when young people become disconnected from school, a result of caring for younger siblings when parents are ill. This is powerful work with local roots and national relevance.
     

    • 36 min
    Power Station with Maya Martin Cadogan

    Power Station with Maya Martin Cadogan

    What I love most about DC PAVE-Parents Amplifying Voices in Education-is that it reinvents an outdated model for building parent leadership. In the conventional model parents meet with teachers to assess their children’s progress and attend school-wide events largely to affirm decisions that have already been made. PAVE wants parents to be in the room where the real decision making is made and prepares them to do exactly that. It focuses on Black and Brown lower-income parents who often feel overlooked by school and city officials and in the era of Covid19, are stressed by a loss of jobs, income and housing. PAVE teaches parents how educational systems work and invites them to shape and propose their own policy platform. Most importantly, parents learn how to partner with city officials to make change possible. PAVE was founded by Maya Martin Cadogan, whose earliest lessons in advocacy came from her mother, an activist devoted to educational equity. There is so much information, nuance and richness in a conversation with Maya that you may have to listen twice. I know I did. 
     
     
     

    • 42 min
    Power Station with Ted Piccolo

    Power Station with Ted Piccolo

    Ted Piccolo refers to himself as an accidental advocate. It all started when he helped a fellow member of the Colville Indian Reservation craft a business plan for a promising new venture. The plan was sound, but her application for a bank loan was rejected. The bank required her to have $2,500 in equity to make the loan. Like many others on the reservation in rural northwest Washington state, she did not have the assets needed (credit, savings or a home) to meet that threshold. It was a crushing setback and it motivated Ted to find a solution for those whom banks do not serve. He found his answer in the Community Development Financial Institution Fund, a resource within the US Department of Treasury, that deploys funds to underinvested communities. Ted took the many steps needed to become a certified CDFI and now operates the Northwest Native Development Fund, which has made $8 million in loans to tribes throughout Washington, Idaho and Montana. As Ted explains, Native people have a long tradition of sustaining their land and prospering through trade. Ted is a voice for the right of all communities to thrive.
     
     
     
     
     
     

    • 30 min
    Power Station with Indira Henard

    Power Station with Indira Henard

    The world needs to catch up to Indira Henard, executive director of the DC Rape Crisis Center. She champions survivors of sexual violence, which she views as inextricably linked to other forms of oppression, including racial and gender inequity. And she applies this intersectional lens to all areas of the Center’s work, from clinical therapy to advocacy for public policies that support survivors. Indira believes that we need to take a bold next step, an inter-generational conversation about sexual violence: how it is defined, whom we believe when it is reported and what accountability looks like. Women that the Center works with have been re-traumatized by the pandemic and the brutal insurrection at the US Capitol. Indira and her team are standing up for them all. As bleak as this work might seem it brings Indira joy. Having swapped out a career on Capitol Hill and the White House to become a voice for and with survivors in the real Washington DC, she is exactly where she needs to be.
     

    • 35 min
    Power Station with Marco Davis

    Power Station with Marco Davis

    What if your job was to ensure that Latino leaders have a seat at decision making tables in the public and private sectors? This is the work that Marco Davis leads as President & CEO of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute. Its fellowships place talented young Latinos with members of Congress who are themselves Latino change makers. This experience, coupled with real-time training, prepares the next generation to navigate the policy making process and the nuances of Capitol Hill culture. With 63 million Latinos in the nation, almost 20% of the population, claiming these seats at the table is long past due. And given the pandemic’s disproportionate impact on Latinos, from rates of infection to loss of businesses to exposure as frontline workers, their engagement in equitable recovery planning is urgent. If you need more evidence of CHCI’s efficacy, its alumni network of 4000  Latino leaders speaks volumes. This pipeline of influence and expertise represents to future of our country. And don’t miss the opportunity to hear great leaders speak from the heart on CHCI’s new podcast, Here to Lead. Marco is optimistic and he makes me optimistic too.
     
     
     
     

    • 37 min
    Power Station with Melissa Jones

    Power Station with Melissa Jones

    If you worry about our nation’s capacity to recover from Covid19, this episode may change your perception of what is possible. Melissa Jones is executive director of BARHII- Bay Area Regional Health Inequities Initiative- a collaborative that is charting a course for recovery in 9 hard-hit counties. This partnership between public health agencies, municipalities and community organizations was launched in the mid 1990s to tackle inequities that are often the underlying cause of illness. They apply the same framework to Covid19, which has disproportionately impacted African Americans, Pacific Islanders and Latinx people, from a loss of jobs to loss of life. BARHII focuses on the social determinants of health, factors that are not addressed in the doctor’s office: housing conditions, isolation, and lack of a living wage. Melissa lays out changes in public policy needed to ensure an equitable recovery. New policies include the provision of housing by municipalities for those who cannot quarantine in crowded households. And BARHII advocates for philanthropy to act with urgency, making grants to cover these costs. Melissa is a leader whose voice must be heard, from here to the White House.
     
     
     
     

    • 34 min

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
22 Ratings

22 Ratings

JayClaw4 ,

Only True Advocates Subscribe

Truly one of the most underrated Podcasts in the country. As someone who is intellectually curious, I always come away informed and feel compelled to do more to make an positive impact in my personal and professional life. The podcasts can be seen as "calls to action" and repeatedly give local, regional and national nonprofit leaders a voice. Cannot understand why the podcasts does not have a major sponsor. It truly deserves one. A must subscribe.

jivetteb ,

Informative and relevant!

Such a well-rounded, informative, and well-presented podcast! I have learned so much about current events and what our non-profit leaders are doing to create change. My favorite episode is hands down the interview with Lizette Escobedo, where she talks about the 2020 Census in times of a global pandemic.

ehustings ,

Working for good

Inspiring, insightful, and at the cutting edge of social justice and change - this podcast is a welcome and optimistic breath of fresh air. Thank you Anne!

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