21 episodes

Three clinical psychologists and trainers at CDP come together to talk about the good, the bad, and the ugly of actually implementing Evidence-Based Psychotherapies (EBP’s). Practical for your Practice is a bi-weekly podcast featuring stories, ideas, support, and actionable intel to empower providers to keep working toward implementing EBP’s with fidelity and effectiveness.



This project is sponsored by the Uniformed Services University (USU); however, the information or content and conclusions do not necessarily represent the official position or policy of, nor should any official endorsement be inferred on the part of, USU, the Department of Defense, or the U.S. Government. 

Practical for Your Practice The Center for Deployment Psychology

    • Health & Fitness
    • 4.9 • 9 Ratings

Three clinical psychologists and trainers at CDP come together to talk about the good, the bad, and the ugly of actually implementing Evidence-Based Psychotherapies (EBP’s). Practical for your Practice is a bi-weekly podcast featuring stories, ideas, support, and actionable intel to empower providers to keep working toward implementing EBP’s with fidelity and effectiveness.



This project is sponsored by the Uniformed Services University (USU); however, the information or content and conclusions do not necessarily represent the official position or policy of, nor should any official endorsement be inferred on the part of, USU, the Department of Defense, or the U.S. Government. 

    Making Space for Your Imposter Syndrome

    Making Space for Your Imposter Syndrome

    We’ve all been there–wondering if we measure up to the expectations we have from others and for ourselves. Imposter Syndrome, as its been sometimes called, is almost universal, and yet feels so unique to ourselves. Join us as we discuss imposter syndrome, how it shows up for us in EBP implementation, and how we can make room for it.Dr. Joshua Semiatin, PHD is a clinical psychologist in Baltimore, MD. He currently practices at Department of Veterans Affairs, Baltimore, MD.Calls-to-action: For example: Subscribe to the Practical for Your Practice PodcastSubscribe to The Center for Deployment Psychology Monthly Email

    • 31 min
    Showing up for Immunocompromised Clients

    Showing up for Immunocompromised Clients

    In the context of a global pandemic where every one of us lives daily with uncertainty and barriers to connection with others, these challenges and burdens are magnified in the lives of our immunocompromised clients. From expanding our understanding of who is immunocompromised to empathy for their unique challenges to discussing practical strategies in clinical care, join us as we sit in the uncertainty together, discussing showing up, connecting with, and serving these clients. Amanda Rhodes, Psy.D. is a licensed psychologist and researcher in the Health Psychology and Neurobehavioral Research Group (HPNRG) at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) / National Institutes of Health (NIH). Dr. Rhodes received a Bachelor of Arts in psychology from Lehigh University, a Master of Arts in psychology from Kean University, and a Doctorate in combined school and clinical psychology from Kean University. Her doctoral dissertation investigated acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) and opioid use in patients with chronic pain. Dr. Rhodes completed a competitive, APA-accredited internship utilizing mindfulness-based interventions at the Brattleboro Retreat Psychiatric Hospital in Vermont, USA. She then completed a two-year postdoctoral research fellowship in the Pediatric Oncology Branch at NCI/NIH.Resources mentioned in this episode: A contextual-behavioral perspective on chronic pain during the COVID-19 pandemic and future times of mandated physical distancingACBS ACT for Health SIG & Resources for working with Chronic Health Conditions If listeners are interested in learning more about this approach, a colleague and I are leading a 2-day (virtual) training in June called ACTivating Health: A Skills Building Workshop to Help People with Chronic Medical Conditions Calls-to-action: For example: Subscribe to the Practical for Your Practice PodcastSubscribe to The Center for Deployment Psychology Monthly Email

    • 28 min
    Enhancing Resilience with Psychological Flexibility Training

    Enhancing Resilience with Psychological Flexibility Training

    What is resilience? What is Psychological Flexibility? What are the points of convergence between these two concepts? Practically speaking (and you know we LOVE practical stuff), it turns out that the Psychological Flexibility model may offer a unique pathway to the direct enhancement of resilience. In this episode, we chat with Dr. Wyatt Evans about his exciting insights and research about the role that psychological flexibility may play in resilience. Wyatt R. Evans, Ph.D., ABPP, is a board-certified clinical psychologist in the VA North Texas Health Care System and private practice in the Dallas-Fort Worth area. His areas of clinical and research interest include combat and operational stress, moral injury, trauma-focused treatment, and resilience enhancement. Dr. Evans currently supports DoD-, VA-and NIH-funded research into the prevention and treatment of PTSD, moral injury, and other stress reactions among military personnel. His primary area of expertise is in Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT), and he has developed programs for utilizing ACT to treat a moral injury, enhance resilience, and facilitate posttraumatic growth. On moral injury, Dr. Evans has published on definitional distinctions, interventions, religious/spiritual considerations, and associated outcomes. Dr. Evans is a co-investigator on an initial acceptability/feasibility trial of ACT for moral injury and is the lead author of a recently published book titled The Moral Injury Workbook. Resources mentioned in this episode: CDP Presents: Engaging Acceptance and Commitment Therapy Processes to Enhance Resilience in Military Personnel with Wyatt Evans, Ph.D., and Andy Santanello, Psy.D. (https://deploymentpsych.org/CDPP-ACT-Archive) [03:20]Bonanno, G. (2021). The end of trauma: How the new science of resilience is changing how we think about PTSD. Basic Books.[23:16]Homepage of the ACT for Military Special Interest Group of the Association for Contextual Behavioral Science (https://contextualscience.org/act_for_military_sig) Calls-to-action: For example: Subscribe to the Practical for Your Practice PodcastSubscribe to The Center for Deployment Psychology Monthly Email

    • 39 min
    Living Our Best Second Lives

    Living Our Best Second Lives

    In this episode, Andy, Kevin, and Jenna chat with Dr. Carin Lefkowitz about CDP’s Second Life training assets. Unique affordances of virtual worlds (including some funny mishaps) are discussed along with some practical tips for making the best use of Second Life to improve your practice. Carin M. Lefkowitz, Psy.D., is a clinical psychologist and Senior Military Behavioral Health Psychologist at the Center for Deployment Psychology (CDP) at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences in Bethesda, Maryland. Dr. Lefkowitz earned her M.A. and Psy.D. in clinical psychology at Widener University, with a concentration in cognitive-behavioral therapy.Resources mentioned in this episode: Second Life landing page in deploymentpsych.org, https://deploymentpsych.org/virtual-provider-training-in-second-life [timestamp] Calls-to-action:Subscribe to the Practical for Your Practice PodcastSubscribe to The Center for Deployment Psychology Monthly Email

    • 30 min
    Making Cognitive Health a Priority in Practice: Getting back to basics with Compensatory Cognitive Training (CCT) and CogSMART

    Making Cognitive Health a Priority in Practice: Getting back to basics with Compensatory Cognitive Training (CCT) and CogSMART

    In this episode, we talk about the ways brain injury, sustained in the context of trauma, can have longer-lasting effects than other mTBI’s, and why mental health providers are in an ideal position to help clients focus on cognitive health by teaching strategies to improve functioning. Join us as Dr. Beth Twamley demystifies how the strategies used in Compensatory Cognitive Training (CCT) and Cognitive Symptom Management and Rehabilitation Therapy (CogSMART) can help to address impairments in prospective memory, attention, learning and memory, and executive functioning. We hope you check out how this recovery-oriented approach can be incorporated into your practice to empower clients to make functional gains and improve their quality of life. Dr. Twamley is a neuropsychologist and a Professor of Psychiatry at UC San Diego. Much of her work is based at the VA San Diego Healthcare System, where she is a VA Rehabilitation Research and Development Research Career Scientist and the Director of the Clinical Research Unit of the Center of Excellence for Stress and Mental Health. Dr. Twamley’s research has focused on cognitive training and other interventions to improve real-world functioning for individuals with psychiatric disorders, traumatic brain injuries, and other cognitive impairments. She has developed and evaluated Compensatory Cognitive Training (CCT) and Cognitive Symptom Management and Rehabilitation Therapy (CogSMART) with funding from NIH, VA, DoD, NSF, BBRF/NARSAD, and UC San Diego grants. These treatment manuals and other clinical materials are available at no charge on her website, www.cogsmart.com. Resources mentioned in this episode: http://www.cogsmart.com/ [18:40]https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCIZPMnYv3RDIYFI7CETy7sA [18:45]https://deploymentpsych.org/COGSmart-Archive [19:50] Calls-to-action: Review webinar recording on CogSMART https://deploymentpsych.org/COGSmart-ArchiveAccess manuals on the CogSMART website: http://www.cogsmart.com/Subscribe to the Practical for Your Practice PodcastSubscribe to The Center for Deployment Psychology Monthly Email

    • 26 min
    Stress is your friend? Reinterpreting Stress as Fuel for Performance

    Stress is your friend? Reinterpreting Stress as Fuel for Performance

    Who isn’t stressed these days? Stress seems ubiquitous in ourselves, our clients, and everyone else! The good news? According to our guest this episode, Dr. Gabriel Paoletti, stress doesn’t have to mean that things are going wrong. Stress is actually an indicator of the things that matter to us and what we care about. Listen with us as Dr. Paoletti stresses reorienting our approach from “feeling good” to “doing good.”Gabriel Paoletti, EdD, MAPP.Dr. Paoletti is a Mental Fitness Scientist at the Uniformed Services University’s Consortium for Health and Military Performance (CHAMP). He is a subject matter expert in mental skills, positive and performance psychology, resilience, and leadership. Dr. Paoletti translates basic and clinical research to create culturally appropriate, evidence-based, impactful written and multimedia educational resources and presentations in the Human Performance Resources by CHAMP (HPRC) team.Resources mentioned in this episode:Human Performance Resources by CHAMP website - https://www.hprc-online.org [14:30]Create a “Stress Helps Me” Mindset worksheet - https://www.hprc-online.org/mental-fitness/spiritual-fitness/create-stress-helps-me-mindset/ [14:40]Make Stress Good For You! - https://www.hprc-online.org/mental-fitness/sleep-stress/make-stress-good-you [26:30]Active Constructive Responding - https://www.hprc-online.org/mental-fitness/sleep-stress/active-constructive-responding-acr-worksheetCalls-to-action: For example:Subscribe to the Practical for Your Practice PodcastSubscribe to The Center for Deployment Psychology Monthly Email

    • 28 min

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
9 Ratings

9 Ratings

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