13 episodes

PT Elevated Podcast is a clinically focused podcast for physical therapists and other rehab providers. We may occasionally talk about big ideas and nerd out on research, but our ultimate goal is to provide knowledge and tools that you can apply in the clinic right away. We want you to learn something that helps you elevate your practice and increase your confidence. Let’s get started.

PT Elevated Evidence In Motion

    • Education
    • 5.0 • 4 Ratings

PT Elevated Podcast is a clinically focused podcast for physical therapists and other rehab providers. We may occasionally talk about big ideas and nerd out on research, but our ultimate goal is to provide knowledge and tools that you can apply in the clinic right away. We want you to learn something that helps you elevate your practice and increase your confidence. Let’s get started.

    Don't Be Afraid to Have Questions | Season 1 Recap

    Don't Be Afraid to Have Questions | Season 1 Recap

    We have had an incredible first season of PT Elevated! In this season's final episode, we are going back through the clinical discussions we have had throughout the season.
    Join Kory, JJ and Paul as they talk through the expert guests' clinical perspectives that they thought were most helpful for new clinicians.
    Here are some of the highlights:
    Every guest had a systematic approach that was different from the other. The focus shouldn't be on the systematic approach but about using your systematic approach well with your patients.
    Doing the basics well is one of the most important things to work on as a new clinician, because experts do the basics well.
    Don't be afraid to have questions. Having questions in your practice is how you learn and grow.
    Take the time to step back and think, instead of jumping on the first diagnosis that comes to mind. Try to prove yourself wrong.
    JJ's Favorite Moments from the Season: On Teresa Schuemann's episode, she said that you can't grandma off the couch and teach her power cleans right away, but you can teach someone that is a grandma how to do power cleans and other exercises properly and you should. Along with Derek Clewley's advice to clinicians to be curious.
    Paul's Favorite Moments from the Season: The idea reflected by many of the guests of "keeping a beginner mind" as a clinician. And the stress that was placed on taking the time to get to know your patients.
    Kory's Favorite Moments from the Season: The humility of the expert guests, giving up their time to help all clinicians with their expertise.
    Ad Info: Continue your learning past what you hear today, EIM offers certifications that elevate your clinical decision making and help get you to the next level of patient care and expertise. Get 5% off by letting your program advisor know you’re a PT Elevated Podcast listener. Check out your program options here.
    More Links:
    Catch up on all the episodes
    @ZimneyKJ
    @PMintkenDPT
    @primalphysicaltherapy

    • 37 min
    Tissue Take Time to Heal | Mark Gallant

    Tissue Take Time to Heal | Mark Gallant

    Mark Gallant, DPT, OCS, FAAOMPT, joins our hosts Paul Mintken and Kory Zimney to talk through lateral hip pain. Dr. Mark works at Onward Richmond, an out of network practice in Richmond, Virginia focused on helping athletes heal quickly and perform better. Dr. Mark is also a graduate of Evidence In Motion's Orthopaedic Physical Therapy Residency and the Orthopaedic Manual Physical Therapy Fellowship.
    Here are some of the highlights:
    Alison Grimaldi's JOSPT article, "Gluteal Tendinopathy: Integrating Pathomechanics and Clinical Features in Its Management" on hip pain in 2015 is the key article that can give you a good foundation to learn more about lateral hip pain.
    Tissues take time to heal. Three visits is not always going give you the time to see your patients get better.
    The tendon is not going to heal if the patient doesn't eat proper nutrition, get proper sleep and have some sort of activity that they do. The lifestyle aspects are the best place to start.
    For runners suffering from, doing hip strengthening is not going to change running mechanics, so the first place to start with these active individuals is to look at their running mechanics.
    Mark Gallant's Clinical Pearl: Excessive data is the enemy. Doing a few tests really well, having a few manual therapy techniques you can do really well and having a few exercises that you can coach really well will be more productive than doing a mediocre job at everything. 
    Ad Info: Continue your learning past what you hear today, EIM offers certifications that elevate your clinical decision making and help get you to the next level of patient care and expertise. Get 5% off by letting your program advisor know you’re a PT Elevated Podcast listener. Check out your program options here.
    The last episode of the season will feature questions and comments from you the listener. Send your questions, whether they be episode-specific, clinical or research-related to podcast@eimpt.com. Your question may be featured in the last episode, so include some info about you and your practice. We look forward to hearing your questions!
    More Links:
    Gluteal Tendinopathy: Integrating Pathomechanics and Clinical Features in Its Management
    Contact Mark Gallant
    @ZimneyKJ
    @PMintkenDPT
    @EIMTeam

    • 30 min
    CPGs narrow the width of the goalpost | Derek Clewley

    CPGs narrow the width of the goalpost | Derek Clewley

    Derek Clewley, DPT, PhD, FAAOMPT, is an assistant professor at Duke Doctor of Physical Therapy program. He is on the team that worked on the 2017 revision of the Neck Pain Clinical Practice Guideline (CPG) as well as the upcoming revision. His research has spanned across orthopaedic physical therapy, including pain science, dry needling and manual therapy.
    Clewley joins our hosts Kory Zimney and Paul Mintken to talk through the 2017 revision of the Neck Pain CPG - how the articles were selected to inform the CPG and the process used to create it.
    Here are some of the highlights:
    The research that is chosen to inform the recommendations in the CPG goes through a rigorous process to be selected and used.
    The wealth of research allowed the 2017 Neck Pain CPG to be more definitive and confident in its recommendations, but going forward there will not be these earth-shattering changes to the CPG.
    Finding clinical decision dilemmas and solving them with the CPG as well as a clinical decision aid is one of the focuses to help clinicians implement the CPG into actual clinical practice.
    As an entry-level clinician, use the CPG as a foundation to build on for your clinical practice and clinical reasoning.
    Derek Clewley's Clinical Pearl: Be curious as a clinician. You can feel confident with your skills and the research, but strike the balance of being open and critical to new research and ideas. Be willing to be somebody different five years from now than you thought you would be.
    Ad Info: Continue your learning past what you hear today, EIM offers certifications that elevate your clinical decision making and help get you to the next level of patient care and expertise. Get 5% off by letting your program advisor know you’re a PT Elevated Podcast listener. Check out your program options here.
    The last episode of the season will feature questions and comments from you the listener. Send your questions, whether they be episode-specific, clinical or research-related to podcast@eimpt.com. Your question may be featured in the last episode, so include some info about you and your practice. We look forward to hearing your questions!
    More Links:
    2017 Neck Pain Clinical Practice Guideline
    @djclewpt
    @ZimneyKJ
    @PMintkenDPT
    @EIMTeam

    • 34 min
    If you don't hit max effort, you don't have a reliable test| Erik Meira

    If you don't hit max effort, you don't have a reliable test| Erik Meira

    Erik Meira, PT, DPT, has been practicing physical therapy for over 20 years. He mainly treats elite athletes at this point in his career alongside running his own company The Science PT, where he hosts a podcast, writes blogs and teaches continuing education courses. Meira joins our hosts Kory Zimney and Paul Mintken to talk about all things ACL injuries.
    Here are some of the highlights:
    Foundational Research for ACL
    Mechanisms for noncontact anterior cruciate ligament injuries: knee joint kinematics in 10 injury situations from female team handball and basketball Young Athletes With Quadriceps Femoris Strength Asymmetry at Return to Sport After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Demonstrate Asymmetric Single-Leg Drop-Landing Mechanics Compensatory Strategies That Reduce Knee Extensor Demand During a Bilateral Squat Change From 3 to 5 Months Following Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Measure your athlete's quad index by thinking of your testing protocol as a combination of hurdles that the athlete needs to cross. One test can't answer everything.
    Taking a step back to consider if there are any other ways to explain the effects you are seeing in your patients is an important part of growing in your clinical reasoning. 
    Erik Meira's Clinical Pearl: I just want to do function, but it's important to get back to the simple, basic things and do them very well. Get yourself a hand-held dynamometer that has an inline setup with a push-pull setup. Then, use it for quantifiable, reliable measures.
    Ad Info: Continue your learning past what you hear today, EIM offers certifications that elevate your clinical decision making and help get you to the next level of patient care and expertise. Get 5% off by letting your program advisor know you’re a PT Elevated Podcast listener. Check out your program options here.
    The last episode of the season will feature questions and comments from you the listener. Send your questions, whether they be episode-specific, clinical or research-related to podcast@eimpt.com. Your question may be featured in the last episode, so include some info about you and your practice. We look forward to hearing your questions!
    More Links:
    The Science PT
    @ZimneyKJ
    @PMintkenDPT
    @EIMTeam
     

    • 43 min
    Protrusion Fixes a Lot of Jaw Issues | Nick Rainey

    Protrusion Fixes a Lot of Jaw Issues | Nick Rainey

    Nick Rainey, PT, DPT, OCS, FAAOMPT joins our hosts Kory Zimney and Paul Mintken to talk about temporomandibular disorders (TMD). He shares his expertise in diagnosing, treating and how to use the knowledge you already have as a physical therapist to help a large portion of patients with TMD.
    Here are some of the highlights:
    Nick Rainey shares how he gained his expertise in TMD through his desire to understand what he felt was an orthopaedic and pain disorder that he could have a real impact on as a physical therapist.
    One of the main screeners for new patients includes a central sensitization screen to help determine overlapping pain conditions, which is often a factor with TMD patients.
    There is a bi-directional relationship between the jaw and the spine. Treating the dysfunction is the key in determining whether to treat the spine or the jaw, instead of treating based on where they are feeling pain.
    The biggest mistake that new clinicians make when looking at a TMD patient is paralysis by analysis. Treat what you see, and don't worry about over-analyzing.
    Dry needling the lateral pterygoid is really helpful because you can't reach it with your hand.
    Nick Rainey's Clinical Pearl: Who cares what you do? Who comes after you if you make a mistake? Understanding how Medicare can fine you and what exactly the HIPPA rules are for your state is important for clinicians to understand what their risks are.
    Ad Info: Continue your learning past what you hear today, EIM offers certifications that elevate your clinical decision making and help get you to the next level of patient care and expertise. Get 5% off by letting your program advisor know you’re a PT Elevated Podcast listener. Check out your program options here.
    The last episode of the season will feature questions and comments from you the listener. Send your questions, whether they be episode-specific, clinical or research-related to podcast@eimpt.com. Your question may be featured in the last episode, so include some info about you and your practice. We look forward to hearing your questions!
    Additional Links:
    Nick Rainey on LinkedIn
    @ZimneyKJ
    @PMintkenDPT
    @EIMTeam

    • 33 min
    Load Isn't as Important as Making the Muscle Tired | Kyle Kimbrell

    Load Isn't as Important as Making the Muscle Tired | Kyle Kimbrell

    Kyle Kimbrell, PT, MPT joins Kory Zimney and JJ Thomas to discuss using Blood Flow Restriction (BFR) in the clinic. Kimbrell was first exposed to BFR through research and Johnny Owens' twitter and now works as an instructor for Owens Recovery Science in the West Coast Division.
    Here are some of the highlights:
    The clinical reasoning behind using BFR with the right patients comes down to a better understanding of the muscle and how it responds to load.
    One of the best cases for BFR are people that have an osteoarthritic knee. You can make the quadricep work hard and the knee doesn't have to 
    Getting your patients discharged quickly doesn't mean that you were successful with your patient. Many patients need capacity building and biology building takes time, and BFR helps with building that biology.
    In building muscles, load isn't as important as making the muscle tired.
    Convincing your patients that are scared of BFR can be as easy as just telling them that the pressure can be tight, but it will only be for a few seconds. Then, you can underload and give them the highest pressure just to let them see how the muscle feels and be familiar with it.
    BFR can reduce the time under tension, because it makes your muscles fatigue faster.
    When your patients starts counting all by themselves, you have the right load for your patient.
    Ad Info: Continue your learning past what you hear today, EIM offers certifications that elevate your clinical decision making and help get you to the next level of patient care and expertise. Get 5% off by letting your program advisor know you’re a PT Elevated Podcast listener. Check out your program options here.
    The last episode of the season will feature questions and comments from you the listener. Send your questions, whether they be episode-specific, clinical or research-related to podcast@eimpt.com. Your question may be featured in the last episode, so include some info about you and your practice. We look forward to hearing your questions!
    More Links:
    Kyle Kimbrell's LinkedIn
    @primalphysicaltherapy
    @ZimneyKJ
    @EIMTeam

    • 35 min

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