10 episodes

Welcome to the Reckoning Press podcast. Reckoning is a nonprofit, annual journal of creative writing on environmental justice. "Reckoning", according to the definition most relevant here, is an imperfect means of navigation by which one determines where they’re going using only where they’ve been. Environmental justice is the notion that the people (and other living things) saddled with the consequences of humanity’s poor environmental choices and the imperative to remedy those choices are not the ones responsible for them. This podcast will feature very occasional poetry, fiction and essays from the journal, plus interviews with the authors. Hosted by publisher Michael J. DeLuca, with guests.

Reckoning Press Podcast Reckoning Press Podcast

    • Arts
    • 5.0 • 2 Ratings

Welcome to the Reckoning Press podcast. Reckoning is a nonprofit, annual journal of creative writing on environmental justice. "Reckoning", according to the definition most relevant here, is an imperfect means of navigation by which one determines where they’re going using only where they’ve been. Environmental justice is the notion that the people (and other living things) saddled with the consequences of humanity’s poor environmental choices and the imperative to remedy those choices are not the ones responsible for them. This podcast will feature very occasional poetry, fiction and essays from the journal, plus interviews with the authors. Hosted by publisher Michael J. DeLuca, with guests.

    Podcast Episode 20: On Having a Kid in the Climate Apocalypse

    Podcast Episode 20: On Having a Kid in the Climate Apocalypse

    Subscribe via RSS, Google Podcasts, Android, Stitcher, iHeartRadio or on iTunes!

    Welcome back to the Reckoning Press podcast. It's been ages, but we're ramping up to a lot of cool new stuff in the coming year and beyond, including lots more podcasts, a fundraiser to increase payrates to 10c/word, $50/page for poetry and pay staff better too, t-shirts, pins, who knows what else. Homebrew recipes. Foraging instructions. Bespoke lectures about culling invasive species. We're flush with ideas, as we should be, but we're always looking for more. Drop us a line if you've got any?

    Reckoning Press is a US-based nonprofit; we flourish under your regard. Please support us on Patreon, consider donating directly, buy a book or an ebook, read our contributors' beautiful work for free online, and submit! We're always open to submissions, we're always excited in particular to read work from Black, brown, Indigenous, queer, disabled, trans, or otherwise marginalized poets, writers and artists.

    You can find all this and more on our website at: reckoning.press/support-us. You can subscribe to this podcast on iTunes or by visiting reckoning.press/audio.

    Thank you very much for listening.


    Hi folks,
    Joey Ayoub, the swift-talking and firily intellectual host of the excellently named political SF podcast The Fire These Times, asked me if I would record this essay for him. He's devoted quite a bit of time on the podcast to the theory and efficacy of solarpunk, and this is great and necessary work--as you may know I am extremely enthusiastic about criticism of solarpunk--I feel like the more critical thinking we devote to the direction we're all taking in imagining a livable, equitable, practicable future, the better chance we have of pulling it off.

    I had not until this moment thought of this essay, "On Having a Kid in the Climate Apocalypse", as part of solarpunk. I wrote it as the editorial for Reckoning 2 back in 2017, when I was still the editor and not merely the publisher of Reckoning, but even then, I'd been thinking of Reckoning as a counterpoint to solarpunk. A journal of creative writing about environmental justice. A practical, constructive approach to imagining the future, a repudiation of climate denialism, fatalism, ecofascism, an acknowledgement of and focus on the feelings all this evokes for us now, in the present. That's what this essay is. And I dearly hope that solarpunk has adapted and will continue to adapt to encompass all that. Because we need a big tent. A tent big enough to hold the world?

    My kid is almost five now. Hopefully that means I've got some distance from the feelings that drove me to write this, but I should warn you that every other time I have attempted to read this aloud has involved tears.

    • 19 min
    Podcast Episode 19: Somnambulist

    Podcast Episode 19: Somnambulist

    Subscribe via RSS, Google Podcasts, Android, Stitcher, iHeartRadio or on iTunes!

    Welcome back to the Reckoning Press podcast. It's been ages, but we're ramping up to a lot of cool new stuff in the coming year and beyond, including lots more podcasts, a fundraiser to increase payrates to 10c/word, $50/page for poetry and pay staff better too, t-shirts, pins, who knows what else. Homebrew recipes. Foraging instructions. Bespoke lectures about culling invasive species. We're flush with ideas, as we should be, but we're always looking for more. Drop us a line if you've got any?

    Reckoning Press is a US-based nonprofit; we flourish under your regard. Please support us on Patreon, consider donating directly, buy a book or an ebook, read our contributors' beautiful work for free online, and submit! We're always open to submissions, we're always excited in particular to read work from Black, brown, Indigenous, queer, disabled, trans, or otherwise marginalized poets, writers and artists.

    You can find all this and more on our website at: reckoning.press/support-us. You can subscribe to this podcast on iTunes or by visiting reckoning.press/audio.

    Thank you very much for listening.


    Today's episode has E. G. Condé reading his own story from Reckoning 6, "Somnambulist", a fever dream of radically revisionist postcolonial Indigenous futurism—what he calls "Taínofuturism". As I understand it, this is E. G.'s first piece of professionally published fiction, but I defy you to detect that in the utter confidence with which he delivers this performance. I don't want to risk breaking the spell, so I'll let his words speak for themselves.
    [Bio below.]

    "Somnambulist" by E. G. Condé

    • 18 min
    Podcast Episode 18: Enclosures

    Podcast Episode 18: Enclosures

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    Today I'm going to read you an essay by Paulo da Costa, "Enclosures", from Reckoning 6. I think of this piece as a new perspective in an ongoing conversation that started, for me, with Kate Schapira's essay "On Political Change, Climate Change, and the Choice to Not Have Children" that appeared in Catapult in 2017, and my editorial piece in Reckoning 2, "On Having a Kid in the Climate Apocalypse" (which just ran in audio form on the excellent Lebanese political podcast The Fire These Times, and which we're planning on re-running here sometime in the next couple weeks). It's a conversation that leads from all the young people all over the world who are throwing themselves out in front of the extractive capitalist machine, begging for a future, and asks how we, the older generation, parents and potential parents and caregivers and people who love children everywhere, are to prepare them for this future we and our parents and ancestors have made for them. How do we adapt the values and skills and ways of understanding the natural world that nurtured us which were instilled in us by older generations in such a way as to honor what they taught us but not let our children be bound, doomed, by all the parts of that which cannot sustain. It's a long, hard conversation, and I'm very grateful to Paulo for continuing it.

    I also think this works brilliantly as a followup to the discussion Juliana Roth, E.G. Condé and Priya Chand had here the other week about animal rights and consciousness. I should warn you that this essay is full of some quite vivid cruelty to animals.

    Also, I should prepare you for the fact that my foreign language background is in Spanish; paulo speaks Portugese and there is a great deal of Portugese in this story which I am going to muck up considerably. Thank you for bearing with me.

    [Bio below.]

    "Enclosures" by paulo da costa

    • 32 min
    Podcast Episode 17: Dramatis Personae of the Apocalypse

    Podcast Episode 17: Dramatis Personae of the Apocalypse

    Subscribe via RSS, Google Podcasts, Android, Stitcher, iHeartRadio or on iTunes!

    Hi everyone, my name's Catherine, and today for the Reckoning Press Podcast I'm going to be reading you the poem "Dramatis Personae of the Apocalypse", which is a poem that appears in Reckoning 6, and it is by the author Avra Margariti.

    This is a poem with particularly dark content, I don’t think Avra would argue with that—as you will see when we get to her bio, she is an author who works deeply in horror, and she has an entire collection of horror poetry which is now out from Weasel Press and is titled The Saint of Witches, and if you like what I'm about to read you, you should go check it out. I think one of the things that allows me to read this poem and not descend too far into the darkness (which is not my preferred location, because I’m kind of a scaredy-cat) is that it’s very cleverly structured to be understood as a self-contained short play, a tragedy: and that’s where we get the title, the dramatis personae or players of the play, who are going to take us into this content but then also let us go from it, when the action is over. And we can kind of imagine that the poem is, like, a short interlude: it’s really difficult stuff, but it’s also formal, stylized, there’s a sense that this is something—an entertainment, a frightening one—which is being set to the side of what we might call realism. So even for me, generally a non-horror-reader because I’m so good at freaking myself out without anybody else's help, I can work with that: and I’m grateful for the vivid starkly lit scenes that Avra shows us here, their argument that in fact there are formal methods for talking about the things that frighten us.

    I'm going to proceed to Avra's bio and then I'll read you the poem.

    [Bio below.]

    Dramatis Personae of the Apocalypse by Avra Margariti

    • 6 min
    Podcast Episode 16: On Animal Rights and Animal Consciousness

    Podcast Episode 16: On Animal Rights and Animal Consciousness

    Subscribe via RSS, Google Podcasts, Android, Stitcher, iHeartRadio or on iTunes!

    Hello, everyone, and welcome back to the Reckoning Press Podcast. It’s me, Michael J. DeLuca. I’m here for a very special experiment; we’re going to try our first roundtable. I have here with me Priya Chand, E.G. Condé and Juliana Roth, and they’re going to talk about animal consciousness, animal rights, and human rights.

    [Bios below.]

    Take it away, Juliana!

    • 1 hr 4 min
    Podcast Episode 15: Heat

    Podcast Episode 15: Heat

    Subscribe via RSS, Google Podcasts, Android, Stitcher, iHeartRadio or on iTunes!

    Welcome back to the Reckoning Press podcast. It's been ages, but we're ramping up to a lot of cool new stuff in the coming year and beyond, including lots more podcasts, a fundraiser to increase payrates to 10c/word, $50/page for poetry and pay staff better too, t-shirts, pins, who knows what else. Homebrew recipes. Foraging instructions. Bespoke lectures about culling invasive species. We're flush with ideas, as we should be, but we're always looking for more. Drop us a line if you've got any?

    Reckoning Press is a US-based nonprofit; we flourish under your regard. Please support us on Patreon, consider donating directly, buy a book or an ebook, read our contributors' beautiful work for free online, and submit! We're always open to submissions, we're always excited in particular to read work from Black, brown, Indigenous, queer, disabled, trans, or otherwise marginalized poets, writers and artists.

    You can find all this and more on our website at: reckoning.press/support-us. You can subscribe to this podcast on iTunes or by visiting reckoning.press/audio.

    Thank you very much for listening.


    Today I'm going to read you Tim Fab-Eme's poem "Heat".

    [Bio below.]

    He is also the current poetry editor for Reckoning 7! So for those of you interested in submitting, this is a chance to get a window on the inside of his head.

    Tim may be the writer who's work has appeared most often in Reckoning's pages. Three different Reckoning editors, including me, have selected his work for publication. I hope you can imagine how delighted I was when he agreed to edit for us. His writing style, the impact it has on me, is hard to quantify, though I keep trying. There's an intensity to it, a personal closeness that comes from an incredibly narrow-focused first-person POV and always leaves me fairly devastated. He's obviously interested in form but not bound by it, his lines have a lyricality that comes from rhythmic agility, surprising internal rhyme, and are always informed by his startlingly close observation of people. There's so much here! I'm afraid I'm too much of a fanboy at this point to articulate any of it much more coherently than that, and with respect to this poem, I think anything else I say will be doing the words themselves a disservice. So now I'm going let the poem speak for itself.

    Heat by Tim Fab-Eme

    • 4 min

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