47 episodes

River Talks is an educational series presented by the Cumberland River Compact. River Talks features conversations with experts, artists, researchers, professionals, and characters from around the Cumberland River Basin and beyond. In each episode of River Talks we explore a new topic related to the health, enjoyment, and protection of the Cumberland River basin’s water, people, and special places. Join us as we explore the Cumberland River in each new episode.

River Talks Cumberland River Compact

    • Business
    • 5.0 • 12 Ratings

River Talks is an educational series presented by the Cumberland River Compact. River Talks features conversations with experts, artists, researchers, professionals, and characters from around the Cumberland River Basin and beyond. In each episode of River Talks we explore a new topic related to the health, enjoyment, and protection of the Cumberland River basin’s water, people, and special places. Join us as we explore the Cumberland River in each new episode.

    Hot in Here: Nashville's Urban Heat Island, Impacts, and Mitigation Efforts

    Hot in Here: Nashville's Urban Heat Island, Impacts, and Mitigation Efforts

    The Summer of 2022 is already the second hottest summer in Nashville on record. And it's not over yet. Urban areas like Nashville experience a phenomenon known as the Urban Heat Island Effect, which means temperatures are higher in the city than in surrounding rural areas. Vulnerable residents, such as children and the elderly, are at risk for heat illness when temperatures rise. Hot days aren't just a nuisance. They're dangerous. While it’s not always talked about, there are more heat-related deaths in the United States than deaths from floods, tornadoes, lightning, hurricanes, and blizzards combined. The hottest parts of the city are areas that lack trees and green spaces, which naturally cool us down.

    Nashville is one of 14 cities in the US participating in an urban heat mapping campaign this summer. Community scientists from across Nashville will have the opportunity to participate in the campaign to map hot spots across the city by driving pre-determined routes with sensors attached to their cars. The data will show the warmest and coolest spots in our city to help inform heat mitigation efforts by city public health and environmental officials, nonprofits, urban planners, urban foresters, and researchers.

    Today's guests:


    Krissy Hurley, Meteorologist in Charge at the National Weather Service Office in Nashville, TN
    Dr. Kendra Abkowitz, Chief Sustainability and Resilience Officer with the Office of Mayor John Cooper and the City of Nashville
    Mekayle Houghton, Executive Director, Cumberland River Compact
    Carol Ziegler, Professor of Nursing at Vanderbilt University School of Nursing and Co-Founder of the Climate, Health, and Energy Equity Lab at the Wondr’y
    Dr. David Padgett, Associate Professor of Geography, Tennessee State University

    More information available on our blog: https://cumberlandrivercompact.org/2022/07/26/urban-heat-nashville/


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    • 41 min
    Going on the Offense with Regenerative Agriculture (featuring Mitchell Hora and Jeremiah Durbin)

    Going on the Offense with Regenerative Agriculture (featuring Mitchell Hora and Jeremiah Durbin)

    Now more than ever, farmers are challenged with keeping valuable topsoil on fields, fostering soil that can retain water during periods of drought, and bringing back life to our soils so that they can provide for us long into the future. Healthy soils filter pollutants, store carbon, and infiltrate water, keeping our rivers and streams cleaner and healthier. The continual implementation of soil health practices is part of regenerative agriculture (sometimes referred to as RegenAg) that promotes farming in balance with what nature already does well.

    The regenerative agriculture movement is not necessarily new and follows many practices that Indigenous communities have used for centuries. Common regenerative techniques that are part of the current movement include cover cropping, where crops are planted in the soil after a cash crop is harvested instead of leaving the soil bare, and no-till, which leaves the soil in place rather than plowing. These practices help maintain living roots in the soil, increase water infiltration, and improve future growth in those soils.

    In this episode of River Talks, we are joined by two leading soil health entrepreneurs and innovators, Mitchell Hora and Jeremiah Durbin. Together, they share how we can scale-up the implementation of regenerative agriculture by going on the offense, using big data and technology, and leaning into a future of farming that helps companies, consumers, and growers meet both their environmental and profit goals.

    https://cumberlandrivercompact.org/2022/06/20/regenerative-sustainable-agriculture-tennessee/

    The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline is a hotline for individuals in crisis or for those looking to help someone else. To speak with a certified listener, call 1-800-273-8255. The Crisis Text Line is a texting service for emotional crisis support. Text HELLO to 741741. It is free, available 24/7, and confidential.


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    • 49 min
    The Water Industry's Impending Silver Tsunami (with TN Assoc. Utility Districts, Pellissippi State, Cumberland River Compact, and TN STEM Innovation Network)

    The Water Industry's Impending Silver Tsunami (with TN Assoc. Utility Districts, Pellissippi State, Cumberland River Compact, and TN STEM Innovation Network)

    Clean and abundant water is provided to communities across the United States by skilled and trained environmental professionals. Yet the water workforce is facing an impending retirement crisis, with an expected 30 to 50 percent of the workforce retiring in the next decade. The crisis has reached emergency levels in many rural communities. At the same time, our water, wastewater, and stormwater infrastructure are in desperate need of reinvestment to be resilient for the future, and stricter guidelines are coming out to protect water.  Ensuring clean water is available to communities necessitates a highly-skilled, trained, and certified workforce.

    The 2018 state water report, Tennessee H20, outlines the crisis we could face. It states that while protecting the availability of water in our state is important, “equal attention must be given to the critical need associated with a diminishing workforce charged with the maintenance, security, and growth of our infrastructure investment. The state is quickly reaching the disturbing point of not having a sufficient number of operators to protect, manage, and maintain these systems in the future.”

    In today's River Talk, we dive into the water workforce crisis and its impacts on our state, plus we explore how to connect young people to these rewarding STEM careers. Our guests on the podcast include Kevin Byrd from the Tennessee Association of Utility Districts, Cristina Carbajo with the Water Quality Technology Program at Pellissippi State Community College, Misty Brown with the Tennessee STEM Innovation Network, and, of course, the Cumberland River Compact. These diverse partners come together in a unique collaborative approach to addressing the water workforce crisis and to providing clean water for Tennesseeans.


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    • 39 min
    Mack Prichard: Collected Stories from Tennessee's "Conservation Conscience"

    Mack Prichard: Collected Stories from Tennessee's "Conservation Conscience"

    The Cumberland River Compact is pleased to collaborate with Tennessee State Parks and the Mack Prichard Legacy Project to present this special episode of River Talks to celebrate the legacy of Mack Prichard. This special episode of River Talks will introduce you to Mack Prichard in honor of Mack Prichard Day on March 31st.

    For some listeners, the name Mack Prichard is synonymous with Tennessee’s environment. For other the name may be new. But if you have stepped foot in a Tennessee State Park, Natural Area, or really any conserved land in our state, you can probably thank Mack for making your experience possible. Mack Prichard was known as The Conservation Conscience” of Tennessee and had a wide and lasting influence on Tennessee's environmental heritage.

    In this episode, you will hear some details about Mack's life, but most importantly, you will hear stories collected from his family, friends, and colleagues about Mack the conservationist, Mack the environmental advocate, and Mack the friend.

    The Cumberland River Compact extends our deepest gratitude to the family, friends, and colleagues of Mack Prichard who generously shared their stories with us.
    https://cumberlandrivercompact.org/2022/03/23/mack-prichard-collected-stories-from-tennessees-conservation-conscience/






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    • 18 min
    The Cumberland River: Nashville's Most Important Asset (with David Ewing)

    The Cumberland River: Nashville's Most Important Asset (with David Ewing)

    Summary:
    "The river belongs to all of us. We are a river city. It is part of our identity even if we do not see it much". - David Ewing

    The Cumberland River is a powerful and important waterway that connects Nashville with the region, supplies water to the area, and continues to be a mode of transportation. In this River Talk, we hear from local historian David Ewing about the history of the river and how it was literally responsible for the founding and growth of Nashville. Hear stories about how it froze, flooded, and how the Cumberland River put Nashville on the map. While sometimes ignored the Cumberland has been a driving force for the growth and development in Nashville.

    This podcast is pre-recorded audio from a lecture from David Ewing in September 2021. You will hear him occasionally mention photos or images.

    See more on our blog: https://cumberlandrivercompact.org/2022/02/21/the-cumberland-river-nashvilles-most-important-asset-with-david-ewing/

    About David Ewing:

    David Ewing is a ninth generation Nashvillian, historian and tour guide. He runs an upscale private history tour company called Nashville History On Tour. The Nashville Scene in 2017 named him “Best Historian”.  In 2018 the Nashville Scene named his Instagram page “The Nashville I Wish I Knew” the “Best Nashville Instagram Page” which has over 20,000 followers. In 2021 Mayor John Cooper said David Ewing is one of Nashville’s greatest historians.

    David is a graduate of Connecticut College and Vanderbilt School of Law. David previously was SVP of Government and Community Relations for the Nashville Chamber and held that same role at Gaylord Entertainment.  David has served on boards of the Metro Historical Commission, Metro Historic Zoning Commission, Cheekwood, The Nashville Symphony, The Nashville Opera, The Hermitage and Travelers Rest.  He is a graduate of Leadership Nashville, Leadership Middle Tennessee, Young Leaders Council and Leadership Donelson Hermitage.


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    • 39 min
    Gone But Not Forgotten: The History and Influence of Port Royal in the Red River Region (with State Park Ranger Bobby Cooley)

    Gone But Not Forgotten: The History and Influence of Port Royal in the Red River Region (with State Park Ranger Bobby Cooley)

    Along the banks of the Red River in Adams, TN sits the remnants of an influential, yet sometimes forgotten town: Port Royal. The town heritage is now stewarded by Tennessee State Parks. At only 30-acres, Port Royal State Park is the second smallest State Park in Tennessee but the area had a big and historic influence on our state. The town rose in prominence as an important commercial hub in the newly founded state of Tennessee. But you did not have to live in Port Royal to experience it. Businesses relied on Port Royal's waterway connections to larger towns, enslaved people built the structures, and thousands of Cherokee were forcibly marched through the town as part of the Trail of Tears.

    In this River Talk, we are joined by Port Royal State Park Ranger Bobby Cooley to explore the history and influence of Port Royal. Woven throughout the story of Port Royal is the influence of one waterway, the Red River, on the growth of the town.

    Learn more about the resources mentioned in this episode on our blog: https://cumberlandrivercompact.org/2022/01/24/port-royal-tennessee/


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    • 48 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
12 Ratings

12 Ratings

ChanKuc ,

Listen to every episode! Love it!

Fun Pod!

Tiffy B. ,

#Nashville...

for the Cumberland ( ͡°( ͡° ͜ʖ( ͡° ͜ʖ ͡°)ʖ ͡°) ͡°) #teamwork

Coco Fennell ,

River Talks

Excellent in variety of info... & great content

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