13 episodes

The Riverwise Podcast is bringing together Detroit citizens to consider new and forms of resistance to continuing economic and political marginalization in communities of color. For over three years now, the Riverwise collective has created media that depicts local activism and the profound new work being done in Detroit neighborhoods. Through the quarterly Riverwise magazine, Riverwise community conversations, and the Riverwise Writing Workshop, we're developing our collective voice.

The podcast format allows us even more access to grassroots organizations and individuals who are rethinking our institutions, creating self-reliant communities, and laying the path to a more equitable society. We hope you can join us as we regularly uplift these stories of personal struggle and new ideas.

Riverwise Podcas‪t‬ Detroit is Different Stories

    • News Commentary

The Riverwise Podcast is bringing together Detroit citizens to consider new and forms of resistance to continuing economic and political marginalization in communities of color. For over three years now, the Riverwise collective has created media that depicts local activism and the profound new work being done in Detroit neighborhoods. Through the quarterly Riverwise magazine, Riverwise community conversations, and the Riverwise Writing Workshop, we're developing our collective voice.

The podcast format allows us even more access to grassroots organizations and individuals who are rethinking our institutions, creating self-reliant communities, and laying the path to a more equitable society. We hope you can join us as we regularly uplift these stories of personal struggle and new ideas.

    Detroit Community High School Makerspace

    Detroit Community High School Makerspace

    Episode Notes
    A class-action lawsuit initiated in July 2020 is demanding the City of Detroit establish a meaningful water affordability program for low-income residents and a permanent end to water shutoffs. Arguing for the plaintiffs, the ACLU and NAACP were in federal court on February 3 to oppose a motion by the City of Detroit to dismiss the lawsuit. We thought this would be a good time to share, in two consecutive podcast episodes, a conversation that was started last year with participants and facilitators of the Detroit Community High School Makerspace in Brightmoor, who are approaching the water crisis by attempting to democratize access to clean water.

    "The true purpose of education is to awaken the gifts of our young people."

    The words of Bart Eddy have guided him and the students at Detroit Community High School (DCHS) for over twenty years. Much of that stated ideal is manifested through the DCHS makerspace, which has become a vital part of the DCHS curriculum and the Brightmoor community.

    Bart Eddy, co-founder of DCHS and its makerspace, joined Riverwise in February 2020 and again during the summer to discuss the importance of shaping an educational environment around community needs and the various interests of a diverse student body.

    Along with the bike repair shop, they've been working on a water filtration and catchment system which will allow water-insecure households in Brightmoor and, eventually, across the city, to collect drinkable water from accessible neighborhood water stations.

    In this 13th installment of the Riverwise Podcast, we present Eddy's insight into the potential of the Makerspace to nurture community while expanding our definition of ‘place-based education’.

    In the next Riverwise podcast episode, we talk to several current and former DCHS students who share more on the water filtration system and what it means to conceive and execute a project that has an immediate impact on families struggling in their community.

    The Riverwise Podcast is bringing together Detroit citizens to consider new and forms of resistance to continuing economic and political marginalization in communities of color. For over three years now, the Riverwise collective has created media that depicts local activism and the profound new work being done in Detroit neighborhoods. Through the quarterly Riverwise magazine, Riverwise community conversations, and the Riverwise Writing Workshop, we're developing our collective voice.

    • 53 min
    Moratorium on Home Evictions

    Moratorium on Home Evictions

    Episode Notes
    Despite President Biden's extension of the federal moratorium on home evictions through March, renters and homeowners throughout Detroit and the nation are still being evicted at alarming rates. The current safeguards against home eviction lack enforcement mechanisms and furthermore, the moratorium doesn’t address the fact that renters and homeowners are falling behind due to surging pandemic-related unemployment. Cash assistance and rental and mortgage forgiveness need to be a part of any compassionate, equitable response to the worst days of the coronavirus pandemic. 

    As renters are falling further behind on rent and housing activists across the nation are strongly advocating for the Center for Disease Control's moratorium to be extended and strengthened. Ending the moratorium, whether now or in March, will leave thousands of Detroiters homeless during the worst health crisis the nation has seen in generations. Most experts agree that the quickest path to community health is secure housing and access to clean water.
     
    Wednesday, January 18 saw a nationally coordinated action against home evictions. Riverwise spoke with Nzinga Masani-Manuel and Rochella Stewart of Detroit People's Platform (DPP), and Reverend Roslyn Bouier of DPP and Brighmoor Connections about the current movement to keep Detroit residents in their homes. Their efforts include lobbying City Council members to sign on to a letter supporting an indefinite extension of federal and state moratoriums, as well as steering government cash assistance directly to Detroit households in need of assistance with rent, utility payments, and clean water.

    The Riverwise Podcast is bringing together Detroit citizens to consider new and forms of resistance to continuing economic and political marginalization in communities of color. For over three years now, the Riverwise collective has created media that depicts local activism and the profound new work being done in Detroit neighborhoods. Through the quarterly Riverwise magazine, Riverwise community conversations, and the Riverwise Writing Workshop, we're developing our collective voice.

    • 54 min
    Detroiters Bill of Rights

    Detroiters Bill of Rights

    Episode Notes
    As we end the year 2020, Detroit People's Platform Transit Justice team member Renard Monczunski gives Riverwise Podcast listeners reason to be optimistic about 2021. Renard is part of a broad, community-based coalition brought together by Detroit councilmembers Mary Sheffield and Raquel Castaneda-Lopez in order to radically reform the city government. Together the group has introduced a 'Detroiters' Bill of Rights', which reflects decades of work by grassroots organizations to provide affordable water, guarantee a healthy environment, and provide increased mobility and disability justice. The ‘Detroiters' Bill of Rights’ increases community control of policing, putting into practice efforts to dismantle racist systems. We will have the opportunity to approve the Detroiters' Bill of Rights— among other City Charter revisions submitted by community members— in the November 2021 election. Renard explains why We should celebrate this opportunity to enshrine what could be the most progressive city charter in the nation.

    The Riverwise Podcast is bringing together Detroit citizens to consider new and forms of resistance to continuing economic and political marginalization in communities of color. For over three years now, the Riverwise collective has created media that depicts local activism and the profound new work being done in Detroit neighborhoods. Through the quarterly Riverwise magazine, Riverwise community conversations, and the Riverwise Writing Workshop, we're developing our collective voice.

    • 50 min
    The Amazon Deal: a Critical Look

    The Amazon Deal: a Critical Look

    Episode Notes
    Sugar Law Center Attorney Tonya Myers-Phillips,
    State Fairgrounds Development Coalition members, Frank and Karen Hammer

    In this tenth episode of the Riverwise Podcast, we hear from three Detroiters fighting for public involvement as the Mayor looks to fast-track the sale of Detroit's State Fairgrounds property to one of the world's richest corporations.

    What does the Amazon deal offer besides unskilled jobs— jobs that aren't even promised to Detroiters? What broader economic and social opportunities do we miss out on when we continue to talk only in terms of the 'job system'? What about the environmental impact for thousands of Eastsiders? Should the Detroit City Council have insisted on more from Amazon in terms of community benefits?

    Frank and Karen Hammer from the State Fairgrounds Development Coalition, which conceived the community-driven METAExpo plan, and Sugar Law Center attorney Tonya Myers-Phillips divulge how Mayor Duggan is avoiding the truth about Amazon job creation and bypassing Detroit's recently established Community Benefits Ordinance (CBO).

    The Riverwise Podcast is bringing together Detroit citizens to consider new and forms of resistance to continuing economic and political marginalization in communities of color. For over three years now, the Riverwise collective has created media that depicts local activism and the profound new work being done in Detroit neighborhoods. Through the quarterly Riverwise magazine, Riverwise community conversations, and the Riverwise Writing Workshop, we're developing our collective voice.

    • 50 min
    Author and Poet Roohee Marshall

    Author and Poet Roohee Marshall

    In this ninth episode of the Riverwise Podcast, we're joined by poet and author Roohee Marshall. Marshall has collected the insights and wisdom of 40 African-American elders through a series of comprehensive interviews. The volume, entitled A Generation Found: Precious Pearls of Wisdom, is a labor of love, inspired partly by a roadside conversation with 93-year old Ionia Woods, and partly by Roohee's own upbringing in Natchez, Mississippi. Marshall shares with us her own childhood memories and the process that led to curating this profound collection.

    In the midst of a year of collective emotional and physical health well beyond our expectations, Generation Found is needed therapy, healing through powerful, yet plainspoken, ancestral narratives.

    For more information, or to purchase online, visit: https://www.rooheemarshall.com

    Episode Notes
    The Riverwise Podcast is bringing together Detroit citizens to consider new and forms of resistance to continuing economic and political marginalization in communities of color. For over three years now, the Riverwise collective has created media that depicts local activism and the profound new work being done in Detroit neighborhoods. Through the quarterly Riverwise magazine, Riverwise community conversations, and the Riverwise Writing Workshop, we're developing our collective voice.

    • 28 min
    Nakia Wallace of Detroit Will Breathe

    Nakia Wallace of Detroit Will Breathe

    Detroit Will Breathe continues to play a critical role in nationwide protests against police brutality-- actions that have endured for over 100 days. In our ninth episode of the Riverwise Podcast, leading Detroit Will Breathe activist Nakia Wallace takes us inside the struggle to maintain a resistance that is being waged on both a local and national front.

    During the August 22 Detroit Will Breathe protest in downtown Detroit, we witnessed perhaps the Detroit Police Department's most brutal response to peaceful protests yet, during which medics, journalists and legal observers, in addition to protestors, continued being physically assaulted and injured, tear-gassed, and having masks pulled off their faces before being with pepper-sprayed and maced. Detroit Will Breathe has since filed a federal lawsuit against the City of Detroit for "unnecessary, unreasonable and excessive violence" during that protest and the dozens of others that have been held since the May 25 murder of George Floyd.

    As federal agents sent by the Trump regime enter the streets of Detroit, Wallace incorporates a historical perspective on resistance to government oppression against Black voices and asks why Detroit political leaders accept federal aid to increase law enforcement but refuse to demand the critical aid we need in the form of basic health services?

    Episode Notes
    The Riverwise Podcast is bringing together Detroit citizens to consider new and forms of resistance to continuing economic and political marginalization in communities of color. For over three years now, the Riverwise collective has created media that depicts local activism and the profound new work being done in Detroit neighborhoods. Through the quarterly Riverwise magazine, Riverwise community conversations, and the Riverwise Writing Workshop, we're developing our collective voice.

    • 57 min

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