9 episodes

Between 1942 and 1945, the US government locked up tens of thousands of Japanese American citizens not because of anything they’d done but because of who they were. Scapegoat Cities is a podcast that helps you know and feel what this episode of mass injustice was. Each episode tells one true and moving human story drawn from historian Eric Muller’s two decades of research, reminding us of the devastating harm that can arise when a frightened nation turns against its own people.

Scapegoat Cities Eric Muller

    • Society & Culture
    • 4.9, 29 Ratings

Between 1942 and 1945, the US government locked up tens of thousands of Japanese American citizens not because of anything they’d done but because of who they were. Scapegoat Cities is a podcast that helps you know and feel what this episode of mass injustice was. Each episode tells one true and moving human story drawn from historian Eric Muller’s two decades of research, reminding us of the devastating harm that can arise when a frightened nation turns against its own people.

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
29 Ratings

29 Ratings

Anne the storyteller ,

Outstanding podcast

As a storyteller, I know that stories open listeners’ hearts and touch us emotionally in a way that mere facts do not. As a Japanese American with family members who were incarcerated at Tule Lake and Minidoka for the crime of looking like the enemy, I am especially grateful for Eric Muller’s carefully researched and moving stories that bring the hardships of the incarceration to life and to a larger audience. These stories are needed more today than ever before and Professor Muller is doing a remarkable job here. Thank you!

AwakenedFamilies ,

Thank you

Thank you professor Muller. My parents met at Heart Mountain and I believe when people experience something so hard, they often want to put into their past - that’s natural. So I am thankful to learn our history from people who did not personally experience the camps.

SRMTS ,

important lessons for today

My family was inerned in Poston and I was born there. Other family members went to Manzanar and Santa Fe. All my life I have heard identities shared by which camp they were in and silent bonds were made. The camp experience was so harrowing that all things of Japanese culture were hidden from me; I am Sansei (third) generation. My mother's skills at brush painting, flower arranging, tea ceremony etc. were never shared with her children in the effort to make us as American as possible. We were especially not taught how to speak Japanese, something I regret today. In the effort to shield the children, memories of camp were done in Japanese and so I grew up knowing very little of our history. This podcast is a revelation and I thank you for it.

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