300 episodes

Twice a week, the Guardian brings you the latest science and environment news

Science Weekly The Guardian

    • Science
    • 4.3 • 318 Ratings

Twice a week, the Guardian brings you the latest science and environment news

    Who really wins if the Enhanced Games go ahead?

    Who really wins if the Enhanced Games go ahead?

    Billed as a rival to the Olympic Games, the Enhanced Games, set to take place in 2025, is a sporting event with a difference; athletes will be allowed to dope. Ian Sample talks to chief sports writer Barney Ronay about where the idea came from and how it’s being sold as an anti-establishment underdog, and to Dr Peter Angell about what these usually banned substances are, and what they could do to athletes’ bodies. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod

    • 16 min
    Soundscape ecology: a window into a disappearing world

    Soundscape ecology: a window into a disappearing world

    What can sound tell us about nature loss? Guardian biodiversity reporter Phoebe Weston tells Madeleine Finlay about her visit to Monks Wood in Cambridgeshire, where ecologist Richard Broughton has witnessed the decline of the marsh tit population over 22 years, and has heard the impact on the wood’s soundscape. As species lose their habitats across the world, pioneering soundscape ecologist Bernie Krause has argued that if we listen closely, nature can tell us everything we need to know about our impact on the planet. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod

    • 16 min
    The senior Swiss women who went to court over climate change, and won

    The senior Swiss women who went to court over climate change, and won

    This week, in a landmark case, the European court of human rights ruled that Switzerland’s weak climate policy had violated the rights of a group of older Swiss women to family life. Ian Sample talks to Europe environment correspondent Ajit Niranjan about why the women brought the case and what the ruling could mean for future climate policy.. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod

    • 15 min
    Remembering physicist Peter Higgs

    Remembering physicist Peter Higgs

    The Nobel prize-winning British physicist Peter Higgs has died aged 94. The confirmation in 2012 of the existence of the Higgs boson particle, five decades after Higgs had first theorised its existence, paved the way for his 2013 Nobel win. Nicknamed ‘the god particle’, the Higgs boson was part of an attempt to explain why the building blocks of the universe have mass. Ian Sample and Madeleine Finlay look back on the life and legacy of a giant of science. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod

    • 17 min
    Horny tortoises and solar mysteries: what scientists can learn from a total eclipse

    Horny tortoises and solar mysteries: what scientists can learn from a total eclipse

    For most people seeing a total solar eclipse is a once in a lifetime experience. But for scientists it can be a fleeting chance to understand something deeper about their field of research. Madeleine Finlay meets solar scientist prof Huw Morgan, of Aberystwyth University, and Adam Hartstone-Rose, professor of biological sciences at NC State University, to find out what they hoped to learn from 8 April’s four minutes of darkness.. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod

    • 17 min
    The science of ‘weird shit’: why we believe in fate, ghosts and conspiracy theories

    The science of ‘weird shit’: why we believe in fate, ghosts and conspiracy theories

    Psychologist Chris French has spent decades studying paranormal claims and mysterious experiences, from seemingly-impossible coincidences to paintings that purportedly predict the future. Ian Sample sits down with French to explore why so many of us end up believing in, what he terms, ‘weird shit’, and what we can learn from understanding why we’re drawn to mysterious and mystic phenomena. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod

    • 18 min

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5
318 Ratings

318 Ratings

Rsemeemoo ,

Inspirational

All of the hosts are brilliant

*Mr. Joshua* ,

A Missed Opportunity for Engagement

My experience with this podcast was far from satisfactory. It lacked the key elements necessary for an engaging and memorable listening journey. Regrettably, the hosts' monotonous delivery, coupled with subpar production quality, absence of structure, unnecessarily lengthy episodes, and unimpressive guest selection, contributed to an underwhelming and forgettable experience. In today's vast landscape of exceptional podcasts, this offering failed to meet even the most fundamental standards of quality and entertainment. I strongly encourage exploring alternative options that feature engaging hosts, well-produced episodes, and valuable insights to make the most of your podcast listening time.

moving on-missu ,

Learn here

SCIFRI science Friday was a go to but they became political and now lacks real discussion and learning. This program well worth your time.

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