99 episodes

Scientificanada is a podcast collective focusing on science news and culture. We are...

The AlmaMAC: weekly radio show on 93.3 CFMU about grad students at McMaster University in Canada. Rotating host schedule (Adam Fortais, Shawn Hercules, and Matthew Berry)

Random Walk: a show about interesting things host Adam Fortais stumbles upon. Topics include research as it is applied to the world of education, media, and well... pretty much anywhere. Monthly.

CUPEcast: CUPE 3906 union news, strike and bargaining updates, and member profiles. Weekly while Unit 1 is in negotiations with McMaster Unv.

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    • Science

Scientificanada is a podcast collective focusing on science news and culture. We are...

The AlmaMAC: weekly radio show on 93.3 CFMU about grad students at McMaster University in Canada. Rotating host schedule (Adam Fortais, Shawn Hercules, and Matthew Berry)

Random Walk: a show about interesting things host Adam Fortais stumbles upon. Topics include research as it is applied to the world of education, media, and well... pretty much anywhere. Monthly.

CUPEcast: CUPE 3906 union news, strike and bargaining updates, and member profiles. Weekly while Unit 1 is in negotiations with McMaster Unv.

    Random Walk 2.6: Joe Muise is changing student's ideas about physics (and attending CUPC 2021)

    Random Walk 2.6: Joe Muise is changing student's ideas about physics (and attending CUPC 2021)

    Joe Muise is a physics teacher at St. Thomas More Collegiate in Burnaby, BC, a CAP, NSTA, Vernier & Prime Minister’s Award Winner, and Step Up Ambassador. On this week's episode, Adam talks to Joe about teaching physics, changing the way students think of a physics education (interested in finance or medicine? You might like physics), and the Canadian Undergraduate Physics Conference panel he was a part of.   

    Follow Joe on Twitter at: https://twitter.com/jm_muise 

    Check out the Step Up physics program: https://engage.aps.org/stepup/home 

    Students on the Beamlines, hosted by Canadian Light Sources: https://www.lightsource.ca/public/education/programs/students-on-the-beamline.php  

    Thanks for listening! If you enjoyed this, please share! And if you can, please consider supporting us on www.Patreon.com/scican . Each like, share, and subscribe helps us make interviews, articles, and projects like this one happen.   

    See ya next time!

    • 30 min
    The AlmaMAC 214: Understanding sex differences in the adaptive response to exercise with Mai Wageh

    The AlmaMAC 214: Understanding sex differences in the adaptive response to exercise with Mai Wageh

    Historically, people with menstrual cycles have been excluded from scientific studies due to concerns about how hormonal fluctuations during the menstrual cycle may affect research findings. This exclusion and underrepresentation in the health literature have significant implications as research suggests that there are important sex differences in health and wellness, including response to exercise. When our muscle cells are exposed to exercise, it causes micro tears which stimulates muscle cells to repair and regenerate. One important player in the process of muscle cell regeneration are satellite cells which are muscle stem cells. While research has shown that there are sex differences in the post-exercise satellite cell response, the underlying mechanisms that may be causing these differences remain unknown. Mai Wageh, a 3rd year PhD Candidate in the Department of Kinesiology, explains how hormones, specifically estrogen and progesterone, may contribute to these observed differences. Tune in to learn more about satellite cells and the important implications that Mai’s research has!

    You can follow Mai on twitter here
    If you want to learn more about the lab Mai works in (Parise Lab), you can follow them on Instagram here or check out their website here

    P.S. if you’re interested in learning more about how women have largely been understudied in scientific research, you can check out Angela Saini’s book, Inferior

    • 30 min
    The AlmaMAC 213: Antibiotic resistance with Pallavi Mukherjee

    The AlmaMAC 213: Antibiotic resistance with Pallavi Mukherjee

    Antibiotics are compounds that fight bacterial infections by either slowing the growth of bacteria or killing them. Antibiotics generally work by inhibiting processes and pathways needed for bacterial growth and/or survival. Enzymes necessary for bacterial growth/virulence (which are absent in mammals) are promising antimicrobial targets. But, how do we know what this inhibitor should look like?  

    Pallavi Mukherjee, a 3rd year PhD Candidate in the Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, aims to answer this question with her research! Tune in to learn more about what the transition state of a reaction is, why isolating its structure can inform the development of antibiotics, and the tools used to study the transition state! You’ll also learn how Pallavi spends her time outside the lab!

    • 30 min
    Random Walk 2.5: Food at COP26, Virgin Vultures, NASA Attacking a Meteor, Ecology in Subnautica

    Random Walk 2.5: Food at COP26, Virgin Vultures, NASA Attacking a Meteor, Ecology in Subnautica

    This week:


    Jessie D takes us deeper into the abyss of Subnautica on Gamer’s Guide to Ecology
    Looks like yuh brought a haggis to a clahmet fight. The biggest climate conference is underway, and they want you to know how much carbon you make by eating their food
    Genetic testing shows California Condor produced sons… and didn’t even need a father. A couple of virgin births, if you will. The segment is so fertile for jokes, but I promise I will abstain. And finally,
    Watching NASA play “Armageddon” starring Bruce Willis. You aren’t gunna want to close your eyes, you aren’t gunna wanna fall asleep etc etc etc, and you won’t want to miss a thing     from this episode.

    That’s it for this episode. If you have comments or questions, find me on Twitter at AdamFortais or email me at fortaisadam@gmail.com .

    Find more of Jessie de Haan on Twitter @deHaanJ , and make sure to follow them on Twitch at justjessieD.

    Our music was provided by my friends from the band Boonie. Find them at boonie.rocks .

    If you liked the show, share it with a friend. We are on all streaming platforms and youtube, just look for scientificanada .

    If you want to learn more, or if you’d like to help us support more creators, head to scientificanada.ca .

    See ya later!

    • 30 min
    Bringing the bio-revolution to Canada: Towards a pan-Canadian Genomics Strategy (CSPC2021)

    Bringing the bio-revolution to Canada: Towards a pan-Canadian Genomics Strategy (CSPC2021)

    Organized by: Genome Canada  

    Twenty years after the Human Genome Project, genomics is delivering on its promise: a big data science that—combined with AI, gene editing and biomanufacturing—is revolutionizing our wellbeing and economies. The U.K., U.S. and others are launching genomics strategies to maximize impact for their citizens. Canada is doing the same. Budget 2021 announced $400M for a new Pan-Canadian Genomics Strategy to build on the excellence Canada has built in genomics. This session will explore what it will take to build an effective Strategy, opportunities for Canada’s continued leadership in genomics, and the confluence of genomics with other transformational technologies.  

    The major takeaways here were our need for our own big database of genomic data that can be used by government, research, industry, etc. The panelists referred to the UK BioBank many times as the best (and only?) example of this, and it’s the consensus that Canada could be the second, if we manage to get our ducks in a row.  

    This was an exciting session, basically it kind of felt like a room of very smart people getting handed a huge sum of money, and asking them how to use it to become world leaders in genomics. Probably because that is more or less what it was. I took a bunch of notes, which you can find on scientificanada.ca, but here I will try to summarize a few of the more interesting points I gleaned from the session.

    • 15 min
    Marshalling Science, Technology and Innovation to Solve Global Problems (CSPC2021)

    Marshalling Science, Technology and Innovation to Solve Global Problems (CSPC2021)

    My main takeaway from this session was that “we all want collaborations”. Many have industry-led collaborative approaches. I will say, a lot of the session felt like name-dropping different initiatives and quoting numbers which is probably useful for some, but from my perspective, a lot of that was too in-the-weeds for me. However, there were some interesting questions from the moderator and audience that I’ll highlight, and then get into some odds and ends from the session. Like Japan’s Moonshot Program, whose Step One is focused on Cybernetic Avatars…

    Organized by: National Research Council Canada  

    The climate crisis cannot be addressed by any single organization, sector, country, or even region. Research in universities and laboratories around the globe must be commercialized if we are to succeed. This panel draws on experts playing a key role in enabling innovation ; Canada, Japan, Norway, Germany and the UK, which are all recognized leaders in climate change related research, innovation and technology. Panelists will present their initiatives addressing climate change, and the role of international partnerships. The session will highlight successes, underline pitfalls, and discuss innovation and commercialization policy approaches that can most effectively address the climate crisis.

    • 10 min

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