81 episodes

SCOTUStalk is a nonpartisan podcast about the Supreme Court for lawyers and non-lawyers alike, brought to you by SCOTUSblog. SCOTUStalk is hosted by Amy Howe and produced by Katie Barlow, Ellena Erskine, Angie Gou, and James Romoser.
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SCOTUStalk SCOTUSblog

    • News
    • 4.3 • 103 Ratings

SCOTUStalk is a nonpartisan podcast about the Supreme Court for lawyers and non-lawyers alike, brought to you by SCOTUSblog. SCOTUStalk is hosted by Amy Howe and produced by Katie Barlow, Ellena Erskine, Angie Gou, and James Romoser.
See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Climate change at the Supreme Court

    Climate change at the Supreme Court

    In the last opinion of the term, the Supreme Court ruled 6-3 in favor of a group of Republican-led states and coal companies to limit the Environmental Protection Agency’s ability to regulate carbon emissions system-wide. Amy sits down with investigative journalist and host of Drilled, Amy Westervelt, to discuss that case, West Virginia v. EPA, and what it means for the future of climate regulation. 
    Send us a question about the court at scotustalk@scotusblog.com or leave us a voicemail at (202) 596-2906. Please tell us your first name and where you’re calling from.
    (Music by Keys of Moon Music via Soundcloud)


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    • 21 min
    The Supreme Court overturns Roe v. Wade

    The Supreme Court overturns Roe v. Wade

    On Friday, June 24, the court ruled in Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization that the Constitution does not confer a right to abortion. Amy talks with abortion law scholar Mary Ziegler, professor of law at University of California, Davis, about the decision and what it means for those seeking abortion care across the country. 
    Send us a question about the court at scotustalk@scotusblog.com or leave us a voicemail at (202) 596-2906. Please tell us your first name and where you’re calling from.
    (Music by Keys of Moon Music via Soundcloud)

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    • 9 min
    An important week for immigration law

    An important week for immigration law

    During the week of June 13, the Supreme Court decided two immigration cases (involving bond hearings for noncitizens in immigration detention) and declined to decide a third (involving the Trump-era “public charge” policy for green card applicants). Shalini Bhargava Ray, who teaches immigration law and administrative law at the University of Alabama, joins Amy to break down these cases.
    Send us a question about the court at scotustalk@scotusblog.com or leave us a voicemail at (202) 596-2906. Please tell us your first name and where you’re calling from.
    (Music by Keys of Moon Music via Soundcloud)


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    • 17 min
    The woman who argued Planned Parenthood v. Casey

    The woman who argued Planned Parenthood v. Casey

    In Planned Parenthood v. Casey’s dramatic joint opinion, the Supreme Court upheld the right to access an abortion 30 years ago this month. Amy talks with Kathryn Kolbert, who argued the case for Planned Parenthood. Kolbert explains what the 1992 argument was like from the inside and how she views Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization.
    An attorney, journalist, and non-profit executive, Kolbert argued two reproductive rights cases before the Supreme Court and served as the first vice president of the Center for Reproductive Rights. She is the co-author of the book Controlling Women: What We Must Do Now to Save Reproductive Freedom. 
    Send us a question about the court at scotustalk@scotusblog.com or leave us a voicemail at (202) 596-2906. Please tell us your first name and where you’re calling from.
    (Music by Keys of Moon Music via Soundcloud)

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    • 25 min
    Entering the homestretch

    Entering the homestretch

    Over the next six weeks the Supreme Court is poised to issue 35 opinions, on topics ranging from gun rights to religion and the EPA’s power to regulate greenhouse gases. Amy is joined by Steven Mazie of The Economist and SCOTUSblog’s James Romoser for a refresher on what’s at stake in those cases. 
    Send us a question about the court at scotustalk@scotusblog.com or leave us a voicemail at (202) 596-2906. Please tell us your first name and where you’re calling from.
    (Music by Keys of Moon Music via Soundcloud)


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    • 31 min
    The Dobbs draft

    The Dobbs draft

    Amy sits down with SCOTUSblog’s media editor, Katie Barlow, to discuss the leaked draft in Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization and the repercussions such an opinion would have on reproductive rights. Plus Amy explains the court’s request for additional briefing in Biden v. Texas, answers listener questions, and gives a look ahead at the coming weeks.
    Send us a question about the court at scotustalk@scotusblog.com or leave us a voicemail at (202) 596-2906. Please tell us your first name and where you’re calling from.
    (Music by Keys of Moon Music via Soundcloud)

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    • 43 min

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5
103 Ratings

103 Ratings

steviehr ,

The best!

Such a great resource on SCOTUS news. Really informative and engaging. I love it!

Empact ,

Barely understand and often fail to articulate the law in question

I’m a follower of the Court, read rulings and amici briefings, and followed this show in hopes of getting an even-handed view of the subjects. You won’t find it here.

For example, in the EPA v. West Virginia, they did not even discuss the central basis for the decision, which is that the law as passed by Congress did not support the actions that the EPA was taking, until the last minute. It’s insane and misleading to evaluate the decision without focussing on this central issue, just adding it as an asterisk at the end of the show.

If the power rests in the people, as expressed through their representatives in Congress, and Congress did not pass the law, on what basis was the administrative state acting? By fiat? As a dictator? The Court exists in part as a guard against abuses of power such as this, and to not even discuss this central question, is to do a disservice to the listeners.

You’re better off reading the rulings and briefings themselves, or the syllabi.

This Ken ,

Not really non partisan

Is seems that when a group claims to be non partisan what they really mean is they promote a far leftist agenda. Lies are the only way to promote a leftist agenda so claiming to be non partisan fits their MO.

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