41 episodes

Highlighting true stories of Black people’s fight for liberation, progress and joy from the Civil War to the Civil Rights Movement and beyond. Seizing Freedom illustrates the myriad ways Black people have sought and defined their own freedom in spite of the monumental forces at work to keep them from it.

Seizing Freedom VPM

    • History
    • 4.5 • 218 Ratings

Highlighting true stories of Black people’s fight for liberation, progress and joy from the Civil War to the Civil Rights Movement and beyond. Seizing Freedom illustrates the myriad ways Black people have sought and defined their own freedom in spite of the monumental forces at work to keep them from it.

    The Fight of the Century

    The Fight of the Century

    Black southerners and their allies were experiencing the brick and mortar of Jim Crow being installed in real time. Racial terror killings had been climbing, lynchings were becoming more shocking and segregation was gaining traction.
    And through all this, Black people were still fighting to find a strategy for surviving the afterlife of slavery so they could achieve the Promised Land of their ancestors’ dreams. Black people had to decide what that strategy was going to be for them and for Black folk beyond their lifetimes. And they were not always in agreement.
    Conservatives like Booker T. Washington, moderates like W.E.B. Du Bois, and radicals like William Monroe Trotter and Ida B. Wells-Barnett were each confident that they had the best strategy to secure black people’s future by dismantling Jim Crow. And they were each determined to have their own way.
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    Episode Artwork by Lyne Lucien. Transcripts, resources, list of voice talent and more available at seizingfreedom.com.
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    This episode of Seizing Freedom is supported by Home. Made., a podcast that explores the meaning of home and what it can teach us about ourselves and each other. Listen to episodes of Home. Made. at https://link.chtbl.com/homemade?sid=podcast.seizingfreedom

    • 46 min
    Interview - Adam Serwer

    Interview - Adam Serwer

    Kidada speaks with Adam Serwer, staff writer at The Atlantic who covers race, politics and justice, about the role of the Black press in America, both historically and in the present. 
    They look at how conspiracy theories, misinformation and slander have been used as a form of media propaganda since the formation of the Ku Klux Klan, and how pioneering journalists like Ida B. Wells-Barnett laid the groundwork for identifying and calling out these campaigns. 
    Additionally, they discuss the evolution of legacy media outlets over time to include more diverse voices, and what it means to tell the truth objectively when reporting on American history as a Black journalist.
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    Episode Artwork by Lyne Lucien. Transcripts, resources and more available at seizingfreedom.com.
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    This episode of Seizing Freedom is supported by Home. Made., a podcast that explores the meaning of home and what it can teach us about ourselves and each other. Listen to episodes of Home. Made. at https://link.chtbl.com/homemade?sid=podcast.seizingfreedom

    • 33 min
    On The World's Stage

    On The World's Stage

    The 1893 World’s Fair in Chicago was an opportunity for the United States to showcase its spectacular growth and signal its arrival as a world power, but it failed to highlight Black Americans’ role in its development, and they took notice. 
    So when Paris hosted the Exposition Universelle in 1900, African Americans knew creating space to showcase their progress to the world was of major importance. 
    Among the exhibition’s attendees was W.E.B. Du Bois. He seized the opportunity to present factual evidence of Black achievement to dispel international stereotypes and convince world powers to apply pressure to the United States to dispel white supremacy and live up to its founding principles.
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    Episode Artwork by Lyne Lucien. Transcripts, resources, list of voice talent and more available at seizingfreedom.com.
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    This episode of Seizing Freedom is supported by Home. Made., a podcast that explores the meaning of home and what it can teach us about ourselves and each other. Listen to episodes of Home. Made. at https://link.chtbl.com/homemade?sid=podcast.seizingfreedom

    • 44 min
    Interview - Kinshasha Holman Conwill & Paul Gardullo

    Interview - Kinshasha Holman Conwill & Paul Gardullo

    Kidada speaks with Kinshasha Holman Conwill, the deputy director of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture; as well as writer, historian and curator at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture, Paul Gardullo.
    They reflect on The World’s Fair in Paris in 1900 and how they would curate a similar display of progress in 2022, alongside a discussion of the transformative power of museum exhibits, generally, and the value of African American exhibits, specifically. 
    Additionally, they share what the recent backlash against the teaching of Black history means for their work and the future of trusted institutions focused on telling more inclusive, complete stories of America’s past.
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    Episode Artwork by Lyne Lucien. Transcripts, resources and more available at seizingfreedom.com.
    ---
    This episode of Seizing Freedom is supported by Home. Made., a podcast that explores the meaning of home and what it can teach us about ourselves and each other. Listen to episodes of Home. Made. at https://link.chtbl.com/homemade?sid=podcast.seizingfreedom

    • 45 min
    Walk! The Streetcar Boycotts

    Walk! The Streetcar Boycotts

    With white supremacist strategies for segregated societies solidifying in towns across America’s South, Black people needed to respond in ways that would ensure the freedoms their predecessors had fought to codify into law remained available to them. 
    Between 1900 and 1910, in more than two dozen cities, African Americans tried to stem the tide of their exclusion from public life by taking the fight to the streets, boycotting streetcars that divided Black and white passengers.
    The pressure applied by these protests wasn’t successful in every instance, but the victories that were won inspired continued activism and pushback against the expansion of Jim Crow laws across the nation.
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    Episode Artwork by Lyne Lucien. Transcripts, resources and more available at seizingfreedom.com.
    ---
    This episode of Seizing Freedom is supported by Home. Made., a podcast that explores the meaning of home and what it can teach us about ourselves and each other. Listen to episodes of Home. Made. at https://link.chtbl.com/homemade?sid=podcast.seizingfreedom

    • 43 min
    Interview - Blair L.M. Kelley

    Interview - Blair L.M. Kelley

    Kidada speaks with historian Blair L.M. Kelley about how segregation grew out of pushback against Black upward mobility, and how Richmond, VA serves as an example of how boycotts can be a powerful tool for collective success to combat issues of justice following the streetcar boycotts in the city at the turn of the 20th century.
    They also discuss the role failure plays in laying the groundwork for future successes in social justice movements, encouraging current activists to look to history for examples of how to continue the fight even in the face of defeat.  
    Additionally, they look at the current political landscape with a new wave of voter suppression laws.
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    Episode Artwork by Lyne Lucien. Transcripts, resources and more available at seizingfreedom.com.
    ---
    This episode of Seizing Freedom is supported by Home. Made., a podcast that explores the meaning of home and what it can teach us about ourselves and each other. Listen to episodes of Home. Made. at https://link.chtbl.com/homemade?sid=podcast.seizingfreedom

    • 34 min

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5
218 Ratings

218 Ratings

AAA12117 ,

Listen with my kids in the car!

Excellent and well-researched! It’s a great way fri me to counter what they are learning and school. Thank you for telling our stories ❤️🙏🏽

Summer Bankowski ,

Great stories!

I love seeing some of my favorite Civil War personalities and meeting new ones - Abraham Galloway, Suzy King Taylor, and William Henry Singleton. Great talk for classroom use.

The interviews with Hilary Green and Kate Masur were expert and refreshing. I learned a lot about the steps Black citizens took to create, extend, and defend their rights. I could hardly wait to do laundry so I could listen in again!

Mememe Ususus ,

Brilliant

So smart, so engaging. The interviews with the historians and musicians about their techniques are so powerful. But nothing is more powerful than the original words of the pastors, soldiers, family members and farmers who were making new lives despite all odds and despite all attempts by both Northerners and Southerners to keep freed people in a subordinate caste. Brilliantly researched, narrated and performed.

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