7 episodes

A podcast featuring the people and ideas that are driving -and disrupting -human rights around the world. You can learn more about the project at our website, www.strengthandsolidarity.org. We welcome your feedback and your suggestions. In particular, if you have a poem or text, a speech, or a piece of music that expresses something important about your own commitment to rights, please tell us about it at pod@strengthandsolidarity.org.

Strength and Solidarit‪y‬ Strength + Solidarity

    • Society & Culture
    • 5.0 • 8 Ratings

A podcast featuring the people and ideas that are driving -and disrupting -human rights around the world. You can learn more about the project at our website, www.strengthandsolidarity.org. We welcome your feedback and your suggestions. In particular, if you have a poem or text, a speech, or a piece of music that expresses something important about your own commitment to rights, please tell us about it at pod@strengthandsolidarity.org.

    6. Argentina: A stunning victory for women

    6. Argentina: A stunning victory for women

    In 2005, a small group of women began a campaign to make abortion legal in Argentina. While rich women might be able to find safe means to terminate their pregnancies, the poor were forced to seek backstreet abortions at grave risk of imprisonment, injury and death. As much as those building the movement believed in their cause, even they were stunned, a mere 13 years later, to see a million people in the streets of Buenos Aires supporting their demands. At the end of 2020, a vote in Senate brought final victory. In this episode, one of the organisers at the heart of the campaign shares the strategies that won the day. And, in this episode’s Coda, the Brazilian samba that seemed to be a lovers’ tiff but was a veiled attack on military rule.

    In this episode: 


    Feminist Victoria Tesoriero breaks down the brilliant, dogged campaign to legalise abortion in Argentina
    The Coda:  How a 1970 samba promised Brazilians a better future beyond dictatorship

    For a list of supplemental readings and additional information about this episode’s content, please visit www.strengthandsolidarity.org/podcast

    Send us your ideas and your feedback at pod@strengthandsolidarity.org

    • 33 min
    5. Hong Kong: Winning support abroad for the struggle at home

    5. Hong Kong: Winning support abroad for the struggle at home

    2020 saw street protest erupt in multiple countries around the globe, sometimes responding to local oppression, sometimes provoked by experience protesters had in common, such as racial injustice or police impunity. Many of these movements mobilized without a centralized leadership or hierarchy, causing some to dub them ‘leaderless’ even though they were able to pack a powerful punch on the  ground; Hong Kong’s democracy movement was a case in point, bringing the territory to a standstill with occupations and strikes. But can a decentralized movement reach beyond its immediate locale and build powerful support internationally? We discuss that question with someone who played a prominent role in the Hong Kong mobilisation - Ching Yin Johnson Yeung, formerly the convenor of the Civil Human Rights Front and past deputy general secretary of the Federation of Students in Hong Kong.

    In this episode:


    Host Akwe Amosu interviews rights activist Ching Yin Johnson Yeung about how the Hong Kong democracy movement was – and wasn’t – able to win international solidarity
    The Coda:  A Mexican poet and nun tells men what she really thinks of them – 300 years ago

    For a list of supplemental readings and additional information about this episode’s content, please visit www.strengthandsolidarity.org/podcast

    Send us your ideas and your feedback at pod@strengthandsolidarity.org

    • 26 min
    4. China: Securing local funds for rights

    4. China: Securing local funds for rights

    When authoritarian governments want to hobble civil society and human rights activists, a favored strategy is to choke off their funding. Since money often comes from foreign donors, a law to limit access to support from abroad can hit activists hard. In China, where conditions were already very tough for rights defenders,  two such laws passed in 2016. Shawn Shih-hung Shieh, director of Social Innovations Advisory, tells us how affected groups are adapting and using innovative strategies to offset their lost income.

    In this episode:


    Host Akwe Amosu and her colleague Chris Stone consider whether leaderless movements are really leaderless
    Civil society researcher Shawn Shieh finds out how Chinese NGOs are coping without foreign funding
    The Coda:  How  a 19th Century American poem inspires hope in Afghanistan

    For a list of supplemental readings and additional information about this episode’s content, please visit www.strengthandsolidarity.org/podcast

    Send us your ideas and your feedback at pod@strengthandsolidarity.org

    • 36 min
    3. Has the Human Rights framework outlived its purpose?

    3. Has the Human Rights framework outlived its purpose?

    South African human rights lawyer Kayum Ahmed’s entire career has been spent defending and extending the rights of excluded and oppressed people, at home and abroad.  But this former CEO of the South African Human Rights Commission harbors considerable doubt about whether the human rights framework rooted in the 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights can meet the demands of radical black and brown activists.

    In this episode: 


    Host Akwe Amosu and her colleague Chris Stone talk about why police reform in Nigeria –and elsewhere –is so hard to achieve
    Interview with human rights lawyer Kayum Ahmed about radical activist critiques of the human rights framework
    The Coda: A song that commemorates the day that US civil rights activists met an African anti-colonial fighter in 1963

    For a list of supplemental readings and additional information about this episode’s content, please visit www.strengthandsolidarity.org/podcast

    Send us your ideas and your feedback at pod@strengthandsolidarity.org

    • 31 min
    2. South Africa: Rebuilding a movement’s culture after crisis

    2. South Africa: Rebuilding a movement’s culture after crisis

    In 2017-18, South African social justice movement, Equal Education, went through a major –and very public -upheaval after allegations emerged of sexual harassment by members of the movement’s leadership.  General Secretary Noncedo Madubedube describes her root and branch effort to rebuild Equal Education’s culture and restore confidence in the organization.

    In this episode:


    Akwe Amosu and her colleague Chris Stone discuss a recent campaign for the release of some Egyptian rights defenders and what it tells us about their organization
    Interview with Noncedo Madubedube, General Secretary of Equal Education, South Africa
    The Coda: Turkish human rights leader Murat Cellikan shares an Ariel Dorfman poem that evokes the pain and fierce determination of the“disappeared”and their loved ones.

    For a list of supplemental readings and additional information about this episode’s content, please visit www.strengthandsolidarity.org/podcast

    Send us your ideas and your feedback at pod@strengthandsolidarity.org.

    • 25 min
    1. Afghanistan: Daring to believe in human rights

    1. Afghanistan: Daring to believe in human rights

    Afghanistan’s Human Rights Commission chair Shaharzad Akbar talks about the challenge of entrenching and enforcing rights amid continuing conflict and violence against civilians. With a state that struggles to deliver public services and great uncertainty about the future of President Ashraf Ghani’s negotiations with the Taliban, how can Afghan citizens have confidence that the human rights framework give them meaningful protection?

    In this episode: 


    Host Akwe Amosu and her colleague Chris Stone discuss the relevance of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights in today’s rights struggles
    Interview with Shaharzad Akbar, Chairperson of Afghanistan’s Independent Human Rights Commission
    The Coda: Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein, former UN High Commissioner for Human Rights, shares a poem by 14th century poet Hafez on the perils of arrogance.

    For a list of supplemental readings and additional information about this episode’s content, please visit www.strengthandsolidarity.org/podcast 

    Send us your ideas and your feedback at pod@strengthandsolidarity.org

    • 35 min

Customer Reviews

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8 Ratings

8 Ratings

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