73 episodes

Suite (212) is a weeky series on Resonance 104.4 FM that explores the arts in their social, political, cultural and historical contexts, broadcasting on Monday afternoons from 2-3pm. We take an inter-disciplinary approach, with an emphasis on innovative, underground or avant-garde work. Sometimes, panels discuss cultural politics; sometimes, we focus on a new publication or exhibition, or a specific individual or group whose work we admire.

Suite (212) Suite (212)

    • Arts
    • 5.0, 3 Ratings

Suite (212) is a weeky series on Resonance 104.4 FM that explores the arts in their social, political, cultural and historical contexts, broadcasting on Monday afternoons from 2-3pm. We take an inter-disciplinary approach, with an emphasis on innovative, underground or avant-garde work. Sometimes, panels discuss cultural politics; sometimes, we focus on a new publication or exhibition, or a specific individual or group whose work we admire.

    The Suite (212) Sessions, no. 18 - Nada Prlja

    The Suite (212) Sessions, no. 18 - Nada Prlja

    In the wake of the coronavirus epidemic and shutting down of much of the UK's cultural life, we have decided to bring you a series of interviews with contemporary artists, writers, filmmakers and other cultural figures, conducted via Skype (so apologies for the diminished audio quality), about their practices, the political issues that inspire them and the socio-economic conditions that have shaped their work.

    In the eighteenth of these Sessions, Juliet talks to artist Nada Prlja about her project Subversion to Red, made to represent the Republic of North Macedonia at the Venice Biennale in 2019. They discuss every aspect of Prlja’s multi-disciplinary project: its engagement with socialist ideology and legacies; its response to the Biennale’s ‘interesting times’ theme; the importance of the round table events with Chantal Mouffe and others; the history of North Macedonia, before and after the break-up of Yugoslavia, and the transformation of post-socialist Skopje; and the Subtle Subversion series in which Prlja re-created works by Yugoslav artists, such as Jordan Grabulovski and Borko Lazeski, as an act of solidarity.

    A full list of references for the programme, with links, can be found via our Patreon at www.patreon.com/suite212, and are available to $3 subscribers.

    • 56 min
    The Suite (212) Sessions, no. 17 - Oreet Ashery

    The Suite (212) Sessions, no. 17 - Oreet Ashery

    In the wake of the coronavirus epidemic and shutting down of much of the UK's cultural life, we have decided to bring you a series of interviews with contemporary artists, writers, filmmakers and other cultural figures, conducted via Skype (so apologies for the diminished audio quality), about their practices, the political issues that inspire them and the socio-economic conditions that have shaped their work.

    In the seventeenth of these Sessions, Juliet talks to London-based visual artist and teacher Oreet Ashery. Born in Jerusalem in 1966 and educated at Sheffield Hallam University and Central Saint Martins, Oreet Ashery is a transdisciplinary artist who engages with biopolitical fiction, autoethnography, gender materiality and potential communities, making large-scale projects that span moving image, performance, music, writing and activism. Here, Ashery discusses her new text ‘We’ve been preparing for this our whole lives’ in respond to the Covid-19 outbreak; her recent film Dying Under Your Eyes (2019), commissioned by the Wellcome Collection for the Misbehaving Bodies exhibition that combined Ashery’s work with that of British artist Jo Spence (1934-1992); her Jarman Award-winning series Revisiting Genesis (2015-16) and its themes around death, dying and the digital; her Party for Freedom (2013), made in response to the rise of Dutch far-right politician Geert Wilders, and The World is Flooding (2014), based on a play by Vladimir Mayakovsky; and the implications of the widespread adoption of digital technology during lockdown for the art world and especially the art school.

    A full list of references for the programme, with links, can be found via our Patreon at www.patreon.com/suite212, and are available to $3 subscribers.

    • 58 min
    The Suite (212) Sessions, no. 16 - Zadie Xa

    The Suite (212) Sessions, no. 16 - Zadie Xa

    In the wake of the coronavirus epidemic and shutting down of much of the UK's cultural life, we have decided to bring you a series of interviews with contemporary artists, writers, filmmakers and other cultural figures, conducted via Skype (so apologies for the diminished audio quality), about their practices, the political issues that inspire them and the socio-economic conditions that have shaped their work.

    In the sixteenth of these Sessions, Juliet talks to Korean-Canadian artist Zadie Xa. Born in 1983 and based in London since studying at the Royal College of Art, Xa works in painting, textiles, film and performance, examining her own identity and her lived experience within the Korean diaspora, using water and marine ecologies as metaphors for exploring the unknown. Juliet spoke to Xa about her recent work responding to the Black Lives Matter protests; how she has experienced the Covid-19 lockdown (including a spike in racist attitudes towards east Asians; her performances at the Venice Biennale and Art Night in 2019; and how her work engages with matrilineal heritage, Korean culture and Oriental imagery in western pop culture.

    A full list of references for the programme, with links, can be found via our Patreon at www.patreon.com/suite212, and are available to $3 subscribers.

    • 54 min
    The Suite (212) Sessions, no. 15 - John Smith

    The Suite (212) Sessions, no. 15 - John Smith

    In the wake of the coronavirus epidemic and shutting down of much of the UK's cultural life, we have decided to bring you a series of interviews with contemporary artists, writers, filmmakers and other cultural figures, conducted via Skype (so apologies for the diminished audio quality), about their practices, the political issues that inspire them and the socio-economic conditions that have shaped their work.

    In the fifteenth of these Sessions, Juliet talks to artist-filmmaker John Smith. Born in London in 1952, Smith remains best known for The Girl Chewing Gum (1976), but has made more than sixty films in a career spanning nearly half a century, working with 16mm and digital film, and showing his work at the London Film-Makers’ Co-op and numerous galleries and cinemas as well as BBC2, Channel 4 and Vimeo. Here, Smith discusses his experiences canvassing for Labour (with Juliet) in the 2019 General Election campaign; his new film Twice (2020) about the government’s Covid-19 communications; his relationship with television in the 1980s and 1990s; his Hotel Diaries (2001-2007) and the War on Terror; and the two films he made around the EU referendum, Who Are We (2016) and A Song for Europe (2017).

    A full list of references for the programme, with links, can be found via our Patreon at www.patreon.com/suite212, and are available to $3 subscribers.

    • 54 min
    The Covid-19 Crisis and the Art Institutions

    The Covid-19 Crisis and the Art Institutions

    The Covid-19 crisis has caused unprecedented challenges for the art world. The lockdown has blown a hole in the finances of large metropolitan institutions and smaller provincial galleries alike, with knock-on effects for staff and artists. It is causing arts organisations to rethink their relationships with local communities and with the internet, and to consider how exhibitions and other functions might work in the age of social distancing, with a likely fall in visitors and revenue when they eventually decide to reopen.

    Joining Juliet to discuss this are Stefan Kalmár, Director of the Institute of Contemporary Arts in London, and Helen Stalker, CEO and Director of the Turnpike Gallery in Leigh, Lancashire. They talked about the origins of the two institutions in the age of cultural democracy, and how they navigated the challenges of austerity and Brexit; their funding models, and expectations of what might change in the wake of the 2019 General Election; how they handled lockdown, including when and why they closed, how they managed their staff and artists, and how much support they’ve received from the Arts Council and elsewhere; when they might reopen, how they might deal with social distancing, how this might change their practice, and whether any crisis-induced changes might be for the good.

    A full list of references for the programme, with links, can be found via our Patreon at www.patreon.com/suite212, and are available to $3 subscribers.

    • 1 hr 16 min
    The Suite (212) Sessions, no. 14 - Jeremy Deller

    The Suite (212) Sessions, no. 14 - Jeremy Deller

    In the wake of the coronavirus epidemic and shutting down of much of the UK's cultural life, we have decided to bring you a series of interviews with contemporary artists, writers, filmmakers and other cultural figures, conducted via Skype (so apologies for the diminished audio quality), about their practices, the political issues that inspire them and the socio-economic conditions that have shaped their work.

    In the fourteenth of these Sessions, Juliet talks to English conceptual, video and installation artist Jeremy Deller, who was born in London in 1966. They discussed Deller’s documentary Everybody in the Place: An Incomplete History of Britain 1984-1992 (2019), commissioned by Frieze and shown on BBC Four; ideas around collective joy and acid communism, as well as young people’s access to culture and the music heritage industry; his film with Nick Abrahams about Depeche Mode fans; his Battle of Orgreave (2001), which recreated a pivotal confrontation during the miners’ strike of 1984-85, and helped Deller to win the Turner Prize in 2004; Deller’s poster campaigns for the 2017 General Election and in support of immigrants during the Covid-19 crisis; and what the culture and higher education sectors might look like in the wake of the pandemic.

    A full list of references for the programme, with links, can be found via our Patreon at www.patreon.com/suite212, and are available to $3 subscribers.

    • 58 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
3 Ratings

3 Ratings

turtledove223344 ,

What a Wonderful Show

I wish there were more shows like this... nourishing. I look forward to future episodes and topics. Thoughtful and informative.

Top Podcasts In Arts

Listeners Also Subscribed To