168 episodes

What if the Marvel Universe was real?

Mike and Ed are radio commentators in 1961 discussing the ramifications of a world with super heroes, monsters & aliens. Why is no one asking, "Is Ironman a good use of StarkCorp shareholder capital?"

www.superserious616.com

Super Serious 616 Edward Nevraumont

    • Kids & Family
    • 5.0 • 7 Ratings

What if the Marvel Universe was real?

Mike and Ed are radio commentators in 1961 discussing the ramifications of a world with super heroes, monsters & aliens. Why is no one asking, "Is Ironman a good use of StarkCorp shareholder capital?"

www.superserious616.com

    Episode 167: Iron Man, Murder Suspect (Tales of Suspense #60) -- December 1964

    Episode 167: Iron Man, Murder Suspect (Tales of Suspense #60) -- December 1964

    In this episode:

    Mike and Ed discuss the police decision to declare Tony Stark missing and Iron Man as a suspect. Did Iron Man kill Tony Stark? Why is Iron Man still in charge of StarkCorp. while he is under investigation? Why hasn’t the board of directors already acted, and how will they respond when they do? Is this the most exciting story since the founding of the Fantastic Four? Also: Pepper Potts, Tony Stark’s secretary, has been kidnapped by a masked villain using a bow and specialty explosive arrows. Is it all related as part of a conspiracy? Or is it just a distraction from the bigger issue of Mr. Stark’s disappearance?

    Behind the comic:

    Most Marvel comics at this time were monthly, in theory (X-Men was bi-monthly). But in practice the comics came out whenever the artists completed their work. This meant that Spider-Man comics were often delayed (Ditko started delivering in a more timely manner in 1965), it also meant that some of the storylines got a little mixed up. There WERE a number of issues released between Tales of Suspense #59 and #60 (Tales to Astonish #61, Fantastic Four #33, Journey Into Mystery #11, and Strange Tales #127) but, coincidentally, none of those issues had any publicly visible events. So from a Super Serious perspective it means Part 2 of this Iron Man drama follows immediately after Part 1. In the real world Part 3 does not come out until January 1965, but from a comic book continuity perspective it happens BEFORE Avengers #11 (which was on newsstands the same day as this issue), so we will cover in our next episode.

    In this issue:

    Tony Stark is frustrated because he feels he needs to wear his armour all the time, lest his fragile heart stop. This means as well that he has to remain Iron Man at all times and tell his closest friends that Tony Stark is away on a secret business matter. His friends call the police, who interrogate Iron Man, who draws suspicion and flees under a hail of bullets from the cops. Meanwhile, Hawkeye is convinced by the Black Widow to raid StarkCorp.‘s factory to steal plans for its newest weapons. Hawkeye kidnaps Tony Starks’s assistant Pepper Potts. This draws Iron Man back to rescue Pepper, whereupon he battles Hawkeye, chasing him off.

    Assumed before the next episode:

    StarkCorp.’s share price keeps going up and down on the uncertainties involving its founder and Iron Man.

    This episode takes place:

    After Pepper Potts has been rescued.

    This is a public episode. If you would like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit www.superserious616.com

    • 10 min
    Episode 166: The Avengers Mansion Tax Shelter (Tales of Suspense #59) -- November 1964

    Episode 166: The Avengers Mansion Tax Shelter (Tales of Suspense #59) -- November 1964

    In This Episode:

    Mike and Ed discuss Tony Stark’s donation of his giant Upper East Side Mansion to the Avengers. Was the mansion donated directly from his personal wealth, or was it done through StarkCorp? What was Tony’s motivation? Is it related to his recent decision to turn StarkCorp temporarily over to Iron Man? Is is suspicious that Iron Man has taken control of Stark Corp within days of also taking possession of one of the most valuable pieces of real estate in New York? Also: Why did the mafia choose this moment to attempt an Avengers Mansion home invasion?

    Behind the Issue:

    This issue marks the first modern stand-alone Captain America story. Going forward Tales of Suspense is splitting its storytelling between Iron Man and Captain America (just as Tales to Astonish has split between Giant Man/Wasp and the Hulk). At this point in Marvel’s history every Avenger has their own stand-alone (or shared stand-alone) title.

    In This Comic

    Coming Soon! Check out the post online.

    This is a public episode. If you would like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit www.superserious616.com

    • 9 min
    Episode 165: Iron Man, CEO (Tales of Suspense #59) -- November 1964

    Episode 165: Iron Man, CEO (Tales of Suspense #59) -- November 1964

    In this episode:

    Mike and Ed discuss the revelation that Tony Stark has put Iron Man in (temporary) charge of StarkCorp. Can someone with a secret identity be a corporate officer of a publicly traded corporation? (No.) Can a CEO unilaterally declare a temporary new temporary CEO without first speaking to his board of directors? (No.) Is Tony Stark doing both of those things anyway? (Yes.) Super Serious is here to explain the rules of corporate governance and why Tony Stark believes rules do not apply to him.

    Behind the comic:

    This may be the first three-part story told by Marvel Comics. It starts here and continues into Tales of Suspense 60 and 61. The idea of Iron Man becoming the CEO of StarkCorp because Tony is not able to remove the armor and living is a great premise that Stan Lee milks for all it is worth (and raises the stakes! Just wait until next issue!)

    In This Issue:

    The Black Knight’s flying horse helps free him from prison. Meanwhile, Tony Stark suffers from a medical emergency. His armour is the only thing that can save him, and so he puts it on. He then battles the Black Knight as Iron Man. After the battle, Tony is worried that he will not survive if he takes his armor off. He decides to stay in his armor and, as Iron Man, tells his two most trusted employees that “Mr. Stark” will be out of town for a while and has left “him”, Iron Man, in charge of the company.

    Assumed before the next episode:

    StarkCorp stock likely drops.

    This episode takes place:

    After Iron Man starts his sort of take over of StarkCorp.

    This is a public episode. If you would like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit www.superserious616.com

    Episode 164: Is Spider-Man a Coward? (Amazing Spider-Man #18) -- November 1964

    Episode 164: Is Spider-Man a Coward? (Amazing Spider-Man #18) -- November 1964

    In this episode:

    Mike and Ed discuss the claim that Spider-Man is a coward. The hero clearly ran from at least two fights (with the Green Goblin and later with Sandman). Does that make him a coward, or just concerned for his own safety? What makes someone a coward? Even if Spider-Man is not a coward, if he is now afraid to engage with supervillains, is he just in the wrong line of work? If you are afraid of driving fast, that is okay, but maybe do not chose to become a race car driver …

    Behind the comic:

    Most of the issues in this time period - across all the titles - are standalone. The hero ends each issue in a very similar place to where he started. This issue is different. In Spider-Man #17, Peter ran away from the Green Goblin because he had to help his aunt. This issue builds on those events. Peter is now worried that he should not be Spider-Man because if something happens to him, his aunt will have no one to care for her. These dilemmas that Stan thrusts on Peter are what make the early Spider-Man titles stand apart from so many of the other titles at the time. Peter’s issues continue into Spider-Man #19.

    In this issue:

    The Daily Bugle publishes a story on how Spider-Man is a coward, and the world at large appears to believe it. J. Jonah Jameson is really playing up the story, and Spider-Man’s reputation is really quite damaged. Peter struggles with what he should do, staying on the sidelines while his aunt is ill. She eventually recovers, and Peter decides that he can return to his duties as Spider-Man.

    Assumed before the next episode:

    People are wondering if they are being a little hard on Spider-Man. I hope.

    This episode takes place:

    While Spider-Man is considered to be a coward.

    This is a public episode. If you would like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit www.superserious616.com

    • 8 min
    Episode 163: Buying Super Powers (Avengers #10) -- November 1964

    Episode 163: Buying Super Powers (Avengers #10) -- November 1964

    In this episode:

    Mike and Ed discuss an ad that has been appearing in the back of comics and magazines that promises to provide customers with superpowers. Are we finally seeing mass-produced superpowers? Is this organization being run by the government? Will getting powers be dangerous? Or is it all a scam or a prank?

    Behind the comic:

    This is the first appearance of Immortus. Immortus is later retconned into being a future version of Kang the Conqueror, but in this appearance he is a standalone character with no connection to Kang.

    In this issue:

    Rick Jones responds to an ad which promises to give him superpowers. It is a ruse by Immortus, who is working with Baron Zemo and the Masters of Evil, to bait the Avengers into a fight. The Avengers oblige, and Immortus, as a master of time, bring various historical figures to the present to fight the Avengers. Ultimately, the Avengers prove their mettle and defeat Immortus and his motley crew drawn from the far reaches of time. This issue also includes a classic “heroes fighting due to a misunderstanding”, and demonstrates the might of Captain America.

    Assumed before the next episode:

    The Avengers are wondering how to protect themselves against someone who can travel through time.

    This episode takes place:

    After the Avengers have defeated Immortus.

    This is a public episode. If you would like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit www.superserious616.com

    • 7 min
    Episode 162: Mutant Prejudice (X-Men #8) -- November 1964

    Episode 162: Mutant Prejudice (X-Men #8) -- November 1964

    In this episode:

    Mike and Ed discuss the recent attack on “The Beast” of the X-Men. Beast was attacked not for what he was doing, but for who he is: a mutant. Why are people anti-mutant? How are mutants different from other people with superpowers? What is driving this hysteria? Is there any logic to the prejudice? How should the broader super-human community respond?

    Behind the comic:

    Until X-Men #8, the X-Men were not very different from the Avengers. They were younger and in school, but both teams worked for the government and fought bad guys and monsters. The X-Men’s villains were more likely to be mutants, but that was just the use of a different rogues gallery. That all changed with X-Men #8, when Stan Lee started with the idea that mutants themselves were “hated and feared”. This idea gains steam over the coming months (Sentinels are introduced in X-Men #14), but this was where it all started!

    In this issue:

    Hank “the Beast” McCoy rescues a child in front of panicked onlookers, following which the crowd attacks him. They identify him as a mutant, whom they apparently hate. Hank is obviously upset, and wonders in anger whether Magneto isn’t right. He leaves the team and becomes a professional wrestler, where he meets a fellow mutant, Unus the Untouchable. After the match, Unus meets with Mastermind to see if Magneto will let him join the Brotherhood, but he gives him another test, which is to defeat a member of the X-Men in combat. And so Unus joins in on a bank robbery, hoping this will lead to a battle with the X-Men. Which it does, although the results are inconclusive, and Unus gets away. When they meet again, Hank shoots him with an energy gun which augments his power, creating a King Midas type scenario, Unus being unable to touch anything. Hank thereafter powers Unus down, having promised him to quit trying to join Magneto and his Brotherhood, and to stop acting supervillainy.

    Assumed before the next episode:

    People are becoming more intolerant towards mutants, which is sad.

    This episode takes place:

    After Unus has been defeated… for now.

    This is a public episode. If you would like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit www.superserious616.com

    • 9 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
7 Ratings

7 Ratings

surbet11 ,

Review

Tons of fun for any marvel fan. If you enjoyed something like Marvels or that kinda on the ground viewpoint of the marvel universe, you’ll probably love this.

allkindsofnogood ,

Super Awesome Idea!

As a long time Marvel Comics fan, my hat goes off to this podcast for basically reviewing classic issues from some of the greatest characters in that line: Fantastic Four, Thor, Avengers etc. and doing it the style of a news radio broadcast! This terrific twist coupled with shorter episode lengths makes for an easy convenient listen that leaves you wanting more!

David Gallaher ,

A Modern Marvel

Hosts Mike and Ed create a ‘man on the street’ style podcast that is creative, fun, and unlike anything you’ve heard before

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