48 episodes

Sustain is a podcast that showcases resources and systems so as to reward open source contributions. We shine the spotlight on people to help their projects to grow and evolve. We also focus on structuring code and organizations to support the efforts of open source contributors. You can listen to previous episodes on Devchat.tv.



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Sustain SustainOSS

    • Tech News
    • 5.0 • 2 Ratings

Sustain is a podcast that showcases resources and systems so as to reward open source contributions. We shine the spotlight on people to help their projects to grow and evolve. We also focus on structuring code and organizations to support the efforts of open source contributors. You can listen to previous episodes on Devchat.tv.



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Newsletter

    Episode 64: Travis Oliphant and Russell Pekrul on NumPy, Anaconda, and giving back with FairOSS

    Episode 64: Travis Oliphant and Russell Pekrul on NumPy, Anaconda, and giving back with FairOSS

    Panelists

    Eric Berry | Justin Dorfman | Alyssa Wright | Richard Littauer


    Guest

    Travis Oliphant | Russell Pekrul


    Show Notes

    Hello and welcome to Sustain! Today, we have two guests from OpenTeams in Austin, Travis Oliphant and Russell Pekrul. Travis is the CEO and Russell is the Program Manager and the Founder and Director of FairOSS. We learn all about what OpenTeams and FairOSS are and how they work. Also, Travis tells us about the non-profit he started called NumFOCUS. Other topics discussed are dependencies and how their values are assigned, NumPy and SciPy, and building relationships with companies, which Russell mentions there is a bit of a “chicken and egg” problem here. There is some incredible advice and fascinating stories shared today so go ahead and download this episode now!



    [00:01:10] We find out what OpenTeams is and how it works. Travis also tells us when he wrote NumPy and SciPy and when he started OpenTeams.
    [00:07:18] Travis tells us about a non-profit he started with a bunch of people called NumFOCUS so there could be a home for the fiscal sponsor for open source projects.
    [00:09:24] Russell tells us what FairOSS is and how it works.
    [00:11:32] Alyssa asks Russell how does he first see the dependencies and then how does he assign that value? He mentions BackYourStack as a starting point.
    [00:13:00] Eric brings up one of the problems he’s found with trying to fund up open source is that it’s very difficult to solve the problem on more a grand scale. He wonders how Travis and Russell make the impact they want with the magnitude of problems they see. A key piece Travis brings up that they recognize is there’s a data gap and projects have to be participating. Alyssa wonders if projects are aware of their dependencies.
    [00:17:22] Richard asks about the dependency graph that they are making. He wonders how do you go down the stack and look all the way at the base and how do you judge the usefulness of what dependencies really matter for what code matters for the business proposition? Richard also wonders if anyone has done equity stuff for open source maintainers.
    [00:23:06] Alyssa is interested in learning more about how Travis and Russell are building the relationships with these companies and what we can do to help.
    [00:26:35] Alyssa asks Travis and Russell to talk about why this, why now, with this being a time of economic contraction, why is this important? Also, why have they been seeing traction during what can be difficult times for a lot of companies?
    [00:27:40] Eric asks if Travis can give an example of a project that he feels does that well, that doesn’t have to go through and do it twice, essentially.
    [00:29:48] Alyssa brings up investments around open source start-ups and how they start with a commitment towards open source and once the investment happens there’s a pivot. She wonders if Travis could talk about how this type of sustainability is shifting that model of these investments. Travis tells a story about speaking to the Founder of SaltStack and how their views matched.
    [00:34:03] We find out where you can learn more about FairOSS and follow them on this journey, invest, and join in.


    Spotlight


    [00:34:52] Justin’s spotlight is Curiefense, which extends Envoy proxy to protect all forms of web traffic.
    [00:35:15] Alyssa’s spotlight is Pixel8.earth.
    [00:36:06] Eric’s spotlight is OctoPrint.
    [00:36:53] Richard’s spotlight is Michael Oliphant’s work.
    [00:37:36] Russell’s spotlight is Conda.
    [00:38:20] Travis’s spotlight is Matplotlib.


    Quotes


    [00:03:25] “We were connecting and creating a social network long before the social networks started. That was the early days of social networks and it was addicting.”
    [00:04:14] “New libraries are starting to be written on numarray and we had SciPy written on numeric and there was this fork in

    • 39 min
    Episode 63: Tobias Augspurger on ProtonTypes, LibreSelery, and Environmentally Sustainable Open Source

    Episode 63: Tobias Augspurger on ProtonTypes, LibreSelery, and Environmentally Sustainable Open Source

    Panelists

    Eric Berry | Justin Dorfman | Richard Littauer


    Guest

    Tobias Augspurger


    Show Notes

    Hello and welcome to Sustain! Our special guest today is Tobias Augspurger, founder of Protontypes. Today, we learn all about Protontypes and LibreSelery. We will also talk about his sustainable awesome-list. We cover the robotics industry, and how open source has influenced it. We cover other sustainability projects, like FarmBot, which blend together community and open source. Tobias tells us other projects he’s interested in doing with ProntonTypes. Download this episode now to find out!


    [00:00:55] Tobias tells us what Protontypes is. He also talks about sustainability for open source, and whether that means environmentally sustainable or sustainable for the maintainers.


    [00:02:50] We learn all about LibreSelery, which launched this fall.


    [00:10:26] Justin asks Tobias his thoughts on bringing more exposure to projects that are deep down in the stack that the others are standing above and how can you get those projects. Justin mentions checking out the Sustain discourse.


    [00:13:56] Tobias tells us how his accelerator works. He talks about his sustainability awesome list.


    [00:19:02] Richard asks Tobias if he’s had any students through Protontypes, or any projects come out of it . Tobias talks about the robotics industry as well. Richard mentions FarmBot, an open source DIY gardening tool.


    [00:24:21] Richard wonders if Tobias has any interests from other projects that aren’t robotics, or in general if he’s using other sorts of projects in Protontypes.


    [00:31:10] Find out here where can you learn more about Protontypes and LibreSelery.


    Spotlight


    [00:32:17] Justin’s spotlight is a website called, WTFisQF.com.
    [00:33:00] Eric’s spotlight is books and jigsaw puzzles.
    [00:33:26] Richard’s spotlight is FarmBot.
    [00:33:44] Tobias’s spotlight is the Wind Turbine published by the International Energy Agency.


    Quotes


    [00:28:55] “I also think that people that work for something should get money if somebody is donating into such a project. You cannot really take donations and do not distribute it into contributors. So then stop taking donations if you don’t need them and give it to something else.”



    Links


    Tobias Augspurger GitHub
    Protontypes-GitHub
    Protontypes LibreSelery-GitHub
    SustainOSS Discourse
    Continuous Donation Distribution to your Project Contributors-Tobias Augspurger
    WTF is QF
    FarmBot
    International Energy Agency Wind Turbine


    Credits


    Produced by Richard Littauer
    Edited by Paul M. Bahr at Peachtree Sound
    Show notes by DeAnn Bahr at Peachtree Sound
    Special Guest: Tobias Augspurger.
    Support Sustain

    • 35 min
    Episode 62: Richard Fontana on the Legal Side of Open Source

    Episode 62: Richard Fontana on the Legal Side of Open Source

    Panelists

    Alyssa Wright | Richard Littauer


    Guest

    Richard Fontana


    Show Notes

    Hello and welcome to Sustain! Our special guest is Richard Fontana, who is a lawyer for Red Hat, where he focuses on legal matters relating to open source software, though his work has also involved a broader range of intellectual property and transactional issues arising out of all phases of the software development lifecycle. He has specialized in open source law for over 15 years, with over 10 of those years having been at Red Hat, and previously worked at Hewlett-Packard and the Software Freedom Law Center as well as several law firms. For several years he was a board director for the Open Source initiative and chaired its license review committee. We will discuss a blog post Richard recently wrote, Kyle Mitchell’s License Zero, API licenses, and if someone wants to become fluent in open source licenses where can they get information. Also, today, we have Alyssa Wright joining us as a new panelist!


    [00:01:34] Richard tells us how he became a lawyer at Red Hat and what he does.


    [00:05:53] Richard mentioned it’s quite uncommon that there are open source specific or lawyers with expertise in open source and he tells us why that is the case. Also, Alyssa asks him if he would advocate for more lawyers in the open source ecosystem, and what can we do as open source practitioners to make legal experts part of the conversation.


    [00:11:16] Richard recently wrote in a blog post about looking to get the open source definitions improved or revamped.


    [00:15:56] Richard tells his thoughts on Kyle Mitchell’s License Zero.


    [00:19:42] We learn more about API licenses from Richard.


    [00:23:40] Alyssa returns back to the article Richard wrote and she wants to know what inspired him to write it, to suggest a revision of the definition now and why is it relevant for what’s happening now in open source.


    [00:29:04] Alyssa asks how someone can become fluent in open source licenses and Richard Littauer mentions choosealicense.com.


    [00:31:49] Alyssa asks Richard if there’s anything reminiscent of open source software development that exists in the legal field.


    [00:35:05] Richard tells us where we can find him and about his stuff on the internet. Also, what he is most excited about going on in the licensing world and the open source legal world.


    Spotlight


    [00:38:52] Alyssa’s spotlights are working on the Digital Infrastructure Grant and Quadratic Funding Expirations with Gitcoin.
    [00:40:17] Richard Littauer’s spotlight is Kevin Mitchell’s website.
    [00:40:42] Richard Fontana’s spotlight is Youtube-dl.


    Links


    Richard Fontana -Twitter
    rfontana@redhat.com
    Red Hat
    “The GPL cooperation commitment and Red Hat projects”- Red Hat Blog by Richard Fontana
    The License Zero Manifesto- Kyle Mitchell
    “Is it time to revise the Open Source Definition?”-by Richard Fontana
    “Should API-restricting licenses qualify as open source?”-by Richard Fontana
    “Why CLAs aren’t good for open source”-by Richard Fontana
    Choose an open source license
    Digital Infrastructure Grant
    Gitcoin Quadratic Funding
    Kevin Mitchell’s website (Projects)
    Youtube-dl


    Credits


    Produced by Richard Littauer
    Edited by Paul M. Bahr at Peachtree Sound
    Show notes by DeAnn Bahr at Peachtree Sound
    Special Guest: Richard Fontana.
    Support Sustain

    • 42 min
    Episode 61: Melissa Logan on Marketing Open Source Effectively and Sustainably

    Episode 61: Melissa Logan on Marketing Open Source Effectively and Sustainably

    Panelists

    Justin Dorfman | Richard Littauer


    Guest

    Melissa Logan


    Show Notes

    Hello and welcome to Sustain! Our special guest today is Melissa Logan, Founder of Constantia.io, a marketing consultancy that focuses on open source and enterprise tech companies. She pioneered the role of open source marketer that helped fuel the rise of open source software development. She also launched the Sexism Field Guide to help people identify and confront all forms of sexism. We will learn why Melissa created Constantia, her work at The Linux Foundation, Apache Cassandra, and Isilon. Also, Melissa talks about having the right personality to do marketing in a community and why she thinks about the community like a prism. Download this episode now to find out more!


    [00:00:48] Melissa tells us all about Constantia and why she created it.


    [00:02:30] Since Melissa has worked mainly with large OSPO’s, Richard wonders if she has had any experience working with smaller organizations or smaller repositories on GitHub type stuff. She also talks about what she did at the Linux Foundation and the projects they started, one specifically called OpenDaylight.


    [00:06:38] When Melissa talks about open source there are two key ways that she describes it.


    [00:07:43] We learn about Melissa working with the Apache Cassandra Community. Justin wonders if there was a company that did support contracts for Cassandra funding this or if this was a grassroots type of deal.


    [00:11:03] We learn what Melissa did at Isilon.


    [00:13:00] Richard wonders how Melissa gets marketing copy in front of people because mailing lists are important to getting into people’s inboxes.


    [00:16:23] Richard asks Melissa if she has any insight on how to market somebody who runs a small react library and she gives some great advice.


    [00:18:47] Melissa tells us how to pitch marketing to open source foundations as something they need to do because the return is so small. Richard wonders if she’s ever had to deal with people who are closed sourced and try to convince them to go open.


    [00:26:55] Since the pandemic has changed a lot of things around marketing, Richard wonders what Melissa’s had to change with how she markets stuff to get in front of people’s eyes over the past six months.


    [00:29:35] Melissa brings up the topic of disaggregated marketing and when you think about doing marketing in a community one of the most important things you need is the right personality. She also explains how she thinks of the community as a kind of prism.


    [00:34:43] If you’re interested in seeing the awesome content that Melissa has put out, she tells us where we can find it online.


    Spotlight


    [00:35:22] Justin’s spotlight is FingerprintJS.
    [00:36:00] Richard’s spotlight is a website with election data that allows you to see what’s happening every minute in all of the battleground states.
    [00:36:41] Melissa’s spotlight is Scribus.net.


    Quotes

    [00:08:01] “At Linux Foundation it was different because it was part of kind of the governance of the project.”


    [00:11:03] “You were at Isilon. I remember reading about it way back in the day and it was acquired by EMC. What did you do there because that just really interests me?”


    [00:17:15] “When you think about doing marketing in a community, there are a lot of people who work at different companies, they have different cultures, they have different reasons for participating. Maybe they’re not aware that you actually want to have a marketing effort.”


    [00:17:32] “So I think what’s really important is to build some kind of architecture of participation for people in your community.”


    [00:19:18] “What are those quote unquote KPI’s in an open source project? What do we look at? I think things like lines of code, stars, those are all, I think you should just set those aside. That r

    • 37 min
    Episode 60: Erik Rasmussen on the hard work of maintaining, marketing, and funding open source libraries

    Episode 60: Erik Rasmussen on the hard work of maintaining, marketing, and funding open source libraries

    Panelists

    Allen "Gunner" Gunn | Eric Berry | Justin Dorfman | Richard Littauer


    Guest

    Erik Rasmussen


    Show Notes

    Hello and welcome to Sustain! Our special guest today is Erik Rasmussen, who’s the creator of Redux Form and Final Form, two of the most popular form state management libraries in the React ecosystem, which we will learn more about. Erik talks about his blog post on, “Open Source Sustainability,” which he wrote out of frustration. He has such a passion and positive attitude for open source, but there are things that bother him as well, which he discusses. We learn that looking for contributions from larger organizations is an issue without the marketing aspect and maybe what can be done to help. Also, Eric Berry shares his vision of the future in open source which is pretty awesome! Download this episode now to find out more!


    [00:01:06] Erik tells us what he does and how he got invited on this podcast. We also learn what Redux Form and Final Form do.


    [00:05:13] Find out what Erik meant when he said it “balloons and it was too much,” but he also said he enjoys maintaining open source. He also talks about his blog post he wrote a couple of months ago and what bothers him about open source.


    [00:08:52] Eric wonders if the sustainability of open source depends on people like Erik because of his positive attitude and have any large companies reached out to him to support him in any way.


    [00:10:14] Justin asks if Erik if his library is on a dependency tree or people go NPM and install your library. Also, Justin wonders what Erik’s going to do to improve in getting the message out there that he’s looking for contributions from larger organizations.


    [00:16:02] Eric is curious if money was never part of the equation and if Erik could never make a dime off of this, how would that change his outlook on open source and the projects that he puts out, and would he continue to maintain them.


    [00:17:24] Eric tells us his vision of the future in open source. ☺


    [00:20:25] Richard mentions in one of Erik’s blog posts he talks about how the donation model doesn’t work, but works partially for some people, and he also mentions an insurance model and Erik elaborates his envision.


    [00:23:57] Richard asks if Erik has any hope and if he’s going to keep working on open source.


    [00:25:20] Erik tells us where we can find him on the internet.


    Spotlight


    [00:26:15] Eric’s spotlight is PgHero by Andrew Kane.
    [00:27:02] Justin’s spotlight is Dato, better menu bar clock with calendar and time zones for macOS.
    [00:27:43] Richard’s spotlight is Etymonline.com.
    [00:28:20] Erik’s spotlight is the GraphQL Code Generator.


    Quotes

    [00:04:10] “And then as a maintainer, this was really my first foray into open source, I made some rookie mistakes of trying to please everyone.”


    [00:06:26] “I love open source and the fact that I can see that it is sort of rotten at its core bothers me, and what I mean by that is the incentives are misaligned from all sides.”


    [00:22:51] “It’s a little bit how our medical system, especially in the U.S. is broken, that your doctor makes more money the sicker you are, and it should be the opposite. We should pay doctors to keep you well and if you get sick then the doctor has to do some work. Same thing with open source, people should be paying for there not to be bugs, and if there are bugs expect because of that contract that they will be immediately fixed.”


    Links


    Erik Rasmussen Twitter
    Final Form
    Redux Form
    “Open Source Sustainability” blog post by Erik Rasmussen
    PgHero-GitHub
    Dato
    Etymonline
    GraphQL Code Generator
    Open Collective-SustainOSS
    Open Collective-Ford Foundation General Support Grant


    Credits


    Produced by Richard Littauer
    Edited by Paul M. Bahr at Peachtree Sound
    Show notes by DeAnn Bahr at Peachtree Sound
    Special Gue

    • 30 min
    Episode 59: Jenn Schiffer on Satire, Coding, Why Teaching OSS Is Super Important

    Episode 59: Jenn Schiffer on Satire, Coding, Why Teaching OSS Is Super Important

    Panelists

    Eric Berry | Justin Dorfman | Richard Littauer


    Guest

    Jenn Schiffer


    Show Notes

    Hello and welcome to Sustain! Our special guest today is Jenn Schiffer, Director of Community at Glitch. Today, we will learn all about how cool Glitch really is and it’s free!


    Also, they are one of the first platforms that let you view source of server-side code. Jenn tells us her internet humor variety show called “Hoobastank2 on Twitch, why she started her satire blog post on Medium when she entered the tech industry, how Glitch is used in the academic areas, and how licensing and sharing should be better communicated in schools. Download this episode to find out more! \


    [00:01:05] Jenn tells us all about what Glitch is.


    [00:02:11] Richard wonders if this is largely for art projects and is there any functional code that’s being used to run businesses on Glitch.


    [00:04:45] Jenn talks about having live code on Glitch. We also learn about her internet humor variety show called “Hoobastank2 on Twitch.


    [00:07:39] Jenn tells us about when she entered the tech industry, teaching computer science, working at NBA, rude blog comments about women in tech, writing satire blog posts on Medium, and “gotchas.”


    [00:12:11] We find out about the archetype of the users of Glitch. Also, we learn about using Glitch in the academic area, Girls Who Code, and artists and entertainers bringing their exhibitions to Glitch virtually since they can’t run in person safely right now.


    [00:18:21] Richard wonders if there are any difficulties in using Glitch, how is it hard to use Glitch, and what could be better for teaching open source in general. Jenn shares when she was first introduced to open source.


    [00:24:50] Justin brings up a point about licensing in open source and not understanding the license and how it should be better communicated in schools in terms of sharing, and Jenn shares her view.


    [00:31:43] Jenn lets us know where we can find her on the web.


    Spotlight


    [00:32:50] Justin’s spotlight is make8bitart.com.
    [00:33:50] Eric’s spotlights are The Spaghetti Detective and Thingiverse.
    [00:36:05] Richard’s spotlight is Jim Kang and his website Smidgeo.com
    [00:36:54] Jenn’s spotlight is the jQuery Project.


    Quotes

    [00:07:39] “So around the time Medium had started, 2013(ish), whatever, I just entered actually the tech industry, because I was in Academia, teaching computer science, and I was like, now I want to build computer science.”


    [00:08:10] “The way that people try to prove that women in tech don’t belong there are with gotchas, like pointing things out that they think are wrong, or maybe they are wrong because we’re not allowed to be wrong.”


    [00:16:34] “We’re seeing a lot of artists and entertainers that are realizing because of the pandemic and quarantine that they have to think of new, virtual ways to bring their art to the masses.”


    [00:19:27] “I’ve had a lot of really interesting conversations with a lot of young developers who are in high school, with Discord exploding there are so many gamers that are learning to code because they’re building bots for Discord.”


    Links


    Jen Schiffer Linkedin
    Jen Schiffer Twitter
    Glitch
    Hoobastank2 on Twitch
    Hoobastank2 on Twitch Twitter
    Jenmoney.biz
    Livelaugh Blog
    Girls Who Code
    Make8bitart
    The Spaghetti Detective
    Thingiverse
    Eric Berry Twitter
    Smidgeo
    Smidgeo Twitter
    jQuery


    Credits


    Produced by Richard Littauer
    Edited by Paul M. Bahr at Peachtree Sound
    Show notes by DeAnn Bahr at Peachtree Sound
    Special Guest: Jenn Schiffer.
    Support Sustain

    • 39 min

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