49 episodes

This is mostly about General Tagalog Practice. Albine helps Non-Filipinos learn a new language: Tagalog. She tutors individuals or groups since 2019. She's a program designer, content creator, and coach; earned her Bachelor's degree in Computer Engineering from Adamson University, Manila; joined the Engineering, Science & Tech Faculty in Emilio Aguinaldo College Cavite and served there for about 10 years; a board passer of the prestigious Licensure Exams For Teachers (Philippines). In 2016, she moved in United States and married Bruce Bodo. Support this podcast: https://podcasters.spotify.com/pod/show/tagalogwithalbine/support

Tagalog With Albine Aralin World LLC

    • Education
    • 4.5 • 4 Ratings

This is mostly about General Tagalog Practice. Albine helps Non-Filipinos learn a new language: Tagalog. She tutors individuals or groups since 2019. She's a program designer, content creator, and coach; earned her Bachelor's degree in Computer Engineering from Adamson University, Manila; joined the Engineering, Science & Tech Faculty in Emilio Aguinaldo College Cavite and served there for about 10 years; a board passer of the prestigious Licensure Exams For Teachers (Philippines). In 2016, she moved in United States and married Bruce Bodo. Support this podcast: https://podcasters.spotify.com/pod/show/tagalogwithalbine/support

    Describe Yourself, Your Family Members And People In Your Community In Tagalog

    Describe Yourself, Your Family Members And People In Your Community In Tagalog

    This tutorial is good for beginners in Tagalog. This will help you talk about your family members in Tagalog and your relationship with other people.



    Vocabulary

    Lolo (grandfather)

    Lola (grandmother)

    Magulang (parents)

    Tatay (father)

    Nanay (mother)

    Kapatíd (sibling, brother or sister)

    Panganay (first child)

    Bunsó (last child)

    Kuya (big brother)

    Ate (big sister)

    Anák (child)

    Tiyo (uncle)

    Tiya (aunt)

    Apó (grandchild)

    Pamangkín (nephew or niece)

    Manugang (son/daughter-in-law)

    Biyenan (father/mother-in-law)

    Bayáw (sister's or brother's spouse)

    Bilás (relationship between spouses of siblings)

    Pinsan (cousin)

    Kamág-anak (relative or extended family member)

    Kaibigan (friend)

    Kapit-bahay (neighbor)

    Kababatâ (childhood friend)

    Ninong (godfather)

    Ninang (godmother)

    Inaanák (godchild)





    Sentence Examples: 



    Tatló kamíng magkapatíd. (3 we siblings)

    Si Justin ang bunsó. (si justin the last-child)

    Walâ akóng kuya kasí panganay akó. (none I big-brother because first-child I)

    Meron ka bang anák? (have you ba child)

    Walâ akóng anák. (none I child)

    Kaibigan ko si Albine. (friend my si Albine)


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    • 43 min
    Mulâ, Nagmulâ, Tagasaán & Nanggaling || Tagalog Common Words & Phrases

    Mulâ, Nagmulâ, Tagasaán & Nanggaling || Tagalog Common Words & Phrases

    This tutorial is good for Upper Beginners & Intermediate in Tagalog. We're talking about a few common words and phrases that are often lost in translation in English. Listen until the end and learn the difference between the following:

    Mulâ & Nagmulâ
    Mulâ & Nanggaling
    Mulâ & Tagasaán
    Nagmulâ & Nanggaling


    Tagalog Word “Mulâ”

    Mulâ in English is “from” and it refers to starting location/place or starting point in time.

    Sentence Examples:

    Mayroón akóng sardinas na mulâ sa Pilipinas. (have I sardines na from sa Pilipinas)
    Mulâ umaga hanggáng gabí ay nagbasá lang akó kahapon. (from morning until night ay read only I yesterday)
    Ipagmaneho mo akó mulâ dito sa bahay hanggáng sa airport. (drive you
    Mulâ noón hanggáng ngayón ay magandá ka pa rin.


    Tagalog Word “Nagmulâ”

    "Nagmulâ" is a verb which means began. It's the past tense of the infinitive verb "magmulâ".

    Sentence Example:
    Pasensya nahulí akó nang datíng, matrapik kasí at nagmulâ pa akó sa Tagatáy.

    Rin Versus Din

    Rin & din mean the same thing. They both mean “too” or “also”. 
    Use “rin” when the word before it ends in a vowel letter. Use “din” when the word before it ends in a consonant letter. For example:


    Pangit din
    Mabait din
    Mabuti rin


    Tagalog Word “Tagasaán”

    If you wish to ask the question "where are you from" avoid saying the word "mulâ" but use the word "tagasaán" instead. Taga is a prefix and it's not appropriate to translate it to English while "saán" is translated as "where". Taga is like saying that a person is "assigned to" or "assigned as". Tagasaán, somehow, can mean "where are you assigned as". But to simplify the meaning, let's accept that "tagasaan" means "where from".


    Tagasaán ka? (taga-where you)
    Tagasaán si Albine? (taga-where si Albine)
    Saán ipinanganák si Albine? (where born si Albine)
    Taga-Ohio akó, ipinanganák akó sa Pilipinas. (Taga-Ohio I, born I sa Philippines)
    Dati sa Cavite akó nakatirá. (Before sa Cavite I living)


    Tagalog Word “Nanggaling”

    Nanggaling is a verb which may mean"have been". It is the past tense of the infinitive verb "manggaling" which means to start from. Manggaling is synonym to magmulâ and it can be interchangeable.

    Sentence Examples:

    Pasensya nahulí akó nang datíng, matrapik kasí at nanggaling pa akó sa Tagatáy.
    Saán nanggaling si Amihan? (where came-from si Amihan; where have Amihan been)
    Nanggaling akó sa trabaho, sa palengke at sa simbahan.


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    • 39 min
    Bawat Versus Tuwíng, Nakaka Versus Pwede, Dulo Versus Bandáng Hulí || Tutorial For Advanced Students In Tagalog

    Bawat Versus Tuwíng, Nakaka Versus Pwede, Dulo Versus Bandáng Hulí || Tutorial For Advanced Students In Tagalog

    What is the difference between “bawat” and “tuwíng”?



    Bawat: is “every” or “each” in English

    Tuwíng is “everytime” or “whenever” in English



    Tuwíng gabí, bawat parking spot dito sa apartment complex ko ay okupado na. (Every night, each parking spot here in my apartment comples is occupied already)



    What is the difference between “nakaka” and “puwede”?



    Nakaka stems from the prefix “maka” or “makapág”. Prefix maka or makapág modify the meaning of a verb; it is used to express capability or ability or possibility to do a certain action. When “maka” or “makapág” is used as a prefix, the verb is in the base form we call infinitive verb or verb with no aspect of time. 



    Verbs with time aspects past, present, and future tenses are called indicative verbs. The prefix “naka” (or nakaka in informal speech) indicates present tense of the Maka Verb while nakapág+ (or nakakapág in informal speech indicates present tense of the Makapág Verb. 



    Nakakapág-Tagalog na akó. (I can speak Tagalog already)

    Pwede na akóng mag-Tagalog. (I’m already allowed to speak Tagalog)



    Sa ngayón, pwede ka nang lumabás nang hindî nakasuót ang mask. (These days, you’re now allowed to go outside without the mask on)

    Sa ngayón, pwede na akóng lumabás nang waláng suót na face masks. 



    Nakakalangóy ka ba? (“Can you swim?” or “Are you able to swim?” or “Do you know how to swim?”)

    Nakakapáglangóy ka ba? (Are you able to swim?)

    Pwede akóng lumangoy. (I’m allowed to swim)



    Pwede ba tayong magkita bukas? (Is it possible for us to meet up tomorrow)

    Nakakakita ka ba kung waláng salamin? (Are you capable to see without eyeglasses)

    Nakakakita ka ba ng shooting stars sa gabi? (Are you capable to see shooting stars at night)

    Pwede ka bang makakita ng shooting star sa gabi? (Is it possible for you to see shooting star at night)

    Hindî akó makakakita ng shooting stars sa gabí kasi ayaw kong lumabas sa gabí… malamíg. (I won’t be able to see shooting stars at night because I don’t want to go outside at night… it’s cold)



    Nakakalangóy akó pero hindî pa pwedeng gamitin ang pool. (I can swim but I’m not allowed to use the pool)

    Hindî akó pwedeng lumangóy kapág mababaw ang pool. (“I won’t swim if the pool is shallow” or “I’d rather not swim if the pool is shallow”)

    Marunong akóng lumangóy. Oo nakakalangóy akó. (I know how to swim. Yes I can swim)

    Hindí ako nakakalangóy… hindî akó natutong lumangóy.

    Hindi akó pwedeng lumangóy! Hindî talagá ako marunong… hindî pwede!



    What is the difference between “dulo” and “bandáng hulí”?



    Dulo: end of the line or end of something.

    Bandáng hulí: towards the end of the event or towards the end of a period of time. Sometimes “bandáng hulí” also means towards the backside.

    Hulí: last or previous, end, late

    Huli: catch



    Sa dulo ng kalye. (At the end of the street)

    Iyóng gusali namin ay nasa dulo pero iyóng specific apartment namin ay nasa gitnâ.

    Nasa dulo ng kalye ang apartment building namin.

    Pero itóng unit namin ay walâ sa dulo.. nasa gitnâ.

    Nasa gitnâ ang unit ko at walâ sa dulo.

    Nasa gitnâ ng hallway ang unit namin.

    Nasa gitnâ ng building ang unit ko.



    Pumila ka sa dulo. (You line up at the end)

    Kararatíng ko lang, nasa dulo ng pila akó



    Sa bandáng hulí ng party (towards the end of the party)

    Anó ang naaalala mo sa bandáng huli ng seryeng Trese?

    Sa bandáng hulí ng shift ko sa trabaho, pagód na pagód akó.

    Sa bandáng hulí ng shift ko, pagód na pagód na akó.

    Sa bandáng hulí ng taón, maraming mga tao ang gustóng mag-exercise ulít.

    Sa bandáng hulí ng taón, gumagawâ ng New Years Resolution ang mga tao.

    Sa bandáng hulí ng taón, gustó ng mga tao ang mag-excercise kasí kumain silá ng kumain sa araw ng Paskó.



    Hulí ng taón (end of the month)

    Hulíng taón (previous or last year)



    S

    • 45 min
    Higher Level Tagalog Practice || Mga Urí Ng Mangga Sa Pilipinas

    Higher Level Tagalog Practice || Mga Urí Ng Mangga Sa Pilipinas

    This episode is suited to advanced students in Tagalog. We'll talk about various types of mangoes in the Philippines:


    Manggang Kalabáw
    Manggang Piko
    Supsupin a.k.a. Pajo
    Indian Mango
    Apple Mango



    Ano ang hitsura ng manggáng kalabáw?

    Medyo bilóg ang hugis ng manggáng kalabáw. Matambók ang mga pisngí nitó. Ang pisngíng bahagi ng manggá ang siyáng mas malamán.



    Anó namán ang hitsura ng manggáng piko?

    Medyo patulís ang ibabáng bahagi ng manggá. Ang pinakáibabáng bahagi ng mangga ay tinatawag na babà.



    Anó ang hitsura ng manggáng supsupin o pajo?

    Masyadong maliít ang manggáng supsupin at siyempre maliit ang butó nitó.



    Anó ang hitsura ng manggáng Indian?

    Mas maliít ang manggáng Indian pero mas malakí itó kumpará sa manggang supsupin. Medyo bilugán din ang hugis nitó.



    Anó ang hitsura ng manggáng Apple?

    Medyo puluhán ang balát ng apple mango at mas malakí itó kumpará sa Indian mango at kadalasan ay mas malakí ito kumpará sa manggáng kalabáw at manggáng piko.



    Vocabulary Building:


    manggáng hilaw (young mango or green mango)
    manggáng hinóg (riped mango or matured mango)
    alamáng (shrimp paste, fermented young shrimps)


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    • 28 min
    The Particle Ba || How To Convert A Sentence Into A Question Statement

    The Particle Ba || How To Convert A Sentence Into A Question Statement

    This episode is good for beginners in Tagalog. The main focus of this tutorial is to help the students construct a few Tagalog question statements through the use of the particle ba. Ba is a particle we use to convert a declarative sentence into an interrogative statement.



    Tagalog Sentence Examples:

    Tamà ba? (Is it/that right?)

    Malî ba? (Is it/that wrong?)



    Si Marielle siyá. (Declarative sentence; She is Marielle.)

    Siyá ba si Marielle. (Question Statement; Is she Marielle)



    Dalaga ka. (Declarative; You’re a single lady.)

    Dalaga ka ba? (Question Statement; Are you a single lady?)



    Bababâ ba? (Is it/this/that going down?)

    Babà ba itó? (Is this a chin?)



    Hindî ba bababâ? (Is it/this/that going down?)



    Sa Pilipinas ka ipinanganák. (Declarative: You’re born in the Philippines)

    Sa Pilipinas ka ba ipinanganák? (Question Statement: Were you born in the Philippines?)



    Sa Walmart ka nagtatrabaho. (Declarative: You’re working at Walmart)

    Sa Walmart ka ba nagtatrabaho? (Question Statement: Do you work at Walmart?)



    Nasa Main Street ang opisina mo. (Declarative: Your office is on Main Street)

    Nasa Main Street ba ang opisina mo? (Question Statement: Is your office on Main Street?)



    Si Brandon ka ba? (Are you Brandon?)

    Miyerkules ba ngayon? (Is it Wednesday today?)


    ---

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    • 26 min
    Identifying Family Members In Tagalog

    Identifying Family Members In Tagalog

    This episode is good for beginners in Tagalog. The main focus of this tutorial is to help you identify your family members including some people in your community. You will also grasp a few phrases that are essential in continuing your conversational skill in Tagalog.



    This episode consists of 2 parts. In part 1, the student is expected to recall his knowledge on body parts, animals, numbers, places, natural phenomenon, and vehicles. The second part is a new lesson about family members.



    Part 1. Vocabulary Review 



    braso (arm)

    bibíg (mouth)

    ilóng (nose)

    kamáy (hand)

    manók (chicken) 

    isdâ (fish)

    kambîng (goat)

    baka (cow, beef)

    baboy (pig, pork)

    ahas (snake) 

    ibon (bird) 



    How To Count?

    walâ, isá, dalawá, tatló, apat, limá, anim, pitó, waló, siyám, sampû, labíng isá, labíndalawá, labíntatló, labíng apat, labínlimá, labíng anim, labímpitó, labíngwaló, lambíngsiyám, daláwampû



    bangko (bank)

    bahay (house) 

    ulán (rain)

    ulap (cloud)

    langit (sky) 

    kulóg (thunder)

    bagyó (typhoon)

    araw (day, sun) 

    kotse (car)

    tren (train)

    eroplano (airplane)

    barkó (ship)

    awto (car)

    trak (truck)

    bus (bus)

    dyip (jeepney)

    traysikel (tricycle)



    Basic Conversation



    walâ (none)

    Hindî, salamat. (No, thank you) 

    Gustó mo ng kapé? (Do you want coffee?)

    Hindî pô, salamat. (No sir/ma'am, thank you.)

    mayroón (there is/are, there exists, have)

    meron (short form of mayroón)

    Tamà ba? (Is it right/correct?)

    Tamà pô ba, teacher? (Is it/this right, teacher?)

    malî (wrong)



    Part 2. Family Members



    magulang (parent)

    tatay (father)

    nanay (mother)

    kapatíd (brother)

    panganay (first child)

    bunsó (last child)

    kuya (older brother)

    ate (older sister)

    anák (child)

    lolo (grandfather)

    lola (grandmother)

    tiyo (uncle)

    tiya (aunt)

    apó (grandchild)

    pamangkín (cousin)

    manugang (son-in-law, daughter-in-law)

    biyenán (father-in-law, mother-in-law)

    bayáw (brother-in-law, sister-in-law)

    bilás (relationship between spouses of siblings)

    pinsán (cousin)

    kamág-anak (relative)



    People In The Community



    kaibigan (friend)

    kapit-bahay (neighbor)

    kababatâ (childhood friend)

    ninong (god mother)

    ninang (god father)

    inaanák (god child)


    ---

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    • 37 min

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