41 episodes

TeachLab is a podcast that investigates the art and craft of teaching. There are 3.5 million K-12 teachers in America, and we want to explore how they can become even better at what they do. Hosted by Justin Reich, MIT Professor and director of the MIT Teaching Systems Lab.

TeachLab with Justin Reic‪h‬ MIT Teaching Systems Lab

    • Education
    • 5.0 • 23 Ratings

TeachLab is a podcast that investigates the art and craft of teaching. There are 3.5 million K-12 teachers in America, and we want to explore how they can become even better at what they do. Hosted by Justin Reich, MIT Professor and director of the MIT Teaching Systems Lab.

    Failure to Disrupt Book Club with Candace Thille

    Failure to Disrupt Book Club with Candace Thille

    For TeachLab’s ninth Failure to Disrupt Book Club we look back at Justin’s live conversation with regular Audrey Watters and special guest Candace Thille, director of Learning Science at Amazon and former researcher and faculty member at Stanford University and at Carnegie Mellon. Together they discuss Chapter 8, The Toxic Power of Data and Experiment.

    “It wasn't just that they didn't know how to use the educational technology. It was their belief about their role as a learner and their belief about her role as an instructor. And so just like you talked about many times in your book, the technology can't do it. The human interactions are what really drive how the technology gets used.” -Candace Thille

    • 52 min
    Failure to Disrupt Book Club with Courtney Bell

    Failure to Disrupt Book Club with Courtney Bell

    For TeachLab’s eighth Failure to Disrupt Book Club we look back at Justin’s live conversation with regular Audrey Watters and special guest Courtney Bell, a former research scientist at the Education Testing Services and now director of the Wisconsin Center for Education Research (WCER), UW–Madison School of Education. Together they discuss the book’s third edtech dilemma, the Trap of Routine Assessment.

    “The assessment practice of observing Justin teach or Justin teaching in an assessment situation is not the same, by definition from Justin's real world teaching… My assertion is, that's always true in every assessment. If that's the case, then we think to ourself where can technology fit into this thing?”
    - Courtney Bell

    • 42 min
    Failure to Disrupt Book Club with Antero Garcia

    Failure to Disrupt Book Club with Antero Garcia

    For TeachLab’s seventh Failure to Disrupt Book Club episode we look back at Justin’s live conversation with regular Audrey Watters and special guest Antero Garcia. He's a faculty member at the Stanford Graduate School of Education and a former teacher in the Los Angeles Unified School District. Together they discuss the book’s second edtech dilemma, the Ed Tech Matthew Effect.

    “Let's start with the community as the designer, and what it means to then imagine what schools and the tools that schools are going to need to build from there. That, to me, seems like the starting place of the conversation. I tend to get grumpier as I think about other kinds of tools because I think they all are generally bad. All of the surveillance stuff is... Not only do I not trust the tool, but I don't trust the motive or the intentions of the companies that are making and selling these tools or of the designers...”

    - Antero Garcia

    • 48 min
    Failure to Disrupt Book Club with Dan Meyer

    Failure to Disrupt Book Club with Dan Meyer

    For TeachLab’s sixth Failure to Disrupt Book Club episode we look back at Justin’s live conversation with regular Audrey Watters and special guest Dan Meyer, the chief academic officer at Desmos. Together they discuss the work of Desmos and the section of Justin’s book on the “Curse of the Familiar.”

    “From our perspective, for us, we are not trying to subvert the school day. We're not trying to get learning outside of the four walls of the classroom. We're not trying to upend schooling and turn everyone into home schoolers. I'm not judging those necessarily, but I'm just saying, we know what we're not trying to do, and we're actually really eager to use the four walls, we understand that there are things that are possible when a bunch of people are together in a room that is impossible during asynchronous experiences. There's this sometimes collective effervescence, it's why we used to go to movie theaters, or why sports are interesting to watch in person, versus on TV. It's that bubbly champagne like feeling when you're all together. So we know what we're trying to change and not trying to change.”

    - Dan Meyer

    • 48 min
    Failure to Disrupt Book Club with Scot Osterweil and Constance Steinkuehler

    Failure to Disrupt Book Club with Scot Osterweil and Constance Steinkuehler

    For TeachLab’s fifth Failure to Disrupt Book Club episode, we look back at Justin’s live conversation with regular Audrey Watters and special guests Scot Osterweil, a game designer and creative director for the MIT Education Arcade, and the esteemed games researcher Constance Steinkuehler. They discuss the history of learning games, their current work, and Failure To Disrupt’s Chapter 4: Testing the Learning at Scale Genres: Learning Games.

    “I've been studying kids in games for a long time. And oftentimes, when you try to tackle issues of how to treat other people online, how to deal with conflict, how to manage your screen time and also stay physically fit, it's very hard to create interventions around games, that kids just don't spit right back out. They just don't take because there are often layers added on top. They're not authentic to the space. In my efforts, and I'm sure people have done better than me, but in my efforts, it always seems to be colonizing and the kids will ignore me, and it comes off as, mom is wagging a finger saying you need to get up off that screen and go stretch.”

    - Constance Steinkuehler

    • 48 min
    Failure to Disrupt Book Club with Natalie Rusk and Mitch Resnick

    Failure to Disrupt Book Club with Natalie Rusk and Mitch Resnick

    For TeachLab’s fourth Failure to Disrupt Book Club episode, we look back at Justin’s live conversation with Natalie Rusk and Mitch Resnick from MIT’s Lifelong Kindergarten Lab and who are the developers of the Computer Clubhouse program and the Scratch programming language. They discuss the founding of these programs as well as Failure To Disrupt’s Chapter 3: Peer-Guided Learning at Scale: Networked Learning Environments.

    “I think sometimes there really is this misperception about this type of creative learning approach... it's growing out of, as you say in the chapter, John Dewey's ideas for the progressive education movement. And sometimes people characterize that as if-- just stand back and kids will do wonderful things on their own. And of course, if you stand back, some kids will do wonderful things on their own. But I think we're very aware that you need a whole variety of supports as Natalie was talking about. So I think sometimes people get the wrong impression about what's going to be needed. And then people might get disillusioned or feel that doesn't live up to the promise if they do just stand back and say, ‘Let it work on its own.’” - Mitch Resnick

    • 35 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
23 Ratings

23 Ratings

don macph ,

Future of Ed Tech

Listen to this podcast to better understand the future of education, ed tech, and why tech alone can’t solve our education challenges.

CPKZAK ,

Informative, engaging, and important podcast

This podcast is a power packed list of people who have championed equity in education. Justin Reich keeps the conversation going while letting his guests share their experiences and insights. I look forward to listening every week!

Boston2031 ,

Great Start!

Only two episodes out so far, and TeachLab is sharing vital lessons. José Luis Vilson on scaffolding questions into tiers that center students, Dr. Beverly Daniel Tatum on crossing lines of difference - powerful ideas to improve instruction and equity.

Top Podcasts In Education

Listeners Also Subscribed To