27 episodes

'Terminal Value' is a Finance term that is used to represent the present value of all future cash flows, with the assumption of perpetual, stable growth.

However, the future is not as predictable as people like to think.

We also have seen that all information we receive is presented with an agenda. The result of this is a persistent 'us vs. them' mindset.

Since nobody knows what to believe anymore, we all need to build our own conclusions. This has created a high degree of anxiety and pessimism due to all the negativity that continues to flow from the media.

A key tenant of the Terminal Value mission is to bring attention to the people and organizations who are working to make things better.

Ultimately, Terminal Value is an ongoing discussion about the future value of ideas and entities in our current world.

Terminal Valu‪e‬ Doug Utberg

    • Management
    • 5.0 • 134 Ratings

'Terminal Value' is a Finance term that is used to represent the present value of all future cash flows, with the assumption of perpetual, stable growth.

However, the future is not as predictable as people like to think.

We also have seen that all information we receive is presented with an agenda. The result of this is a persistent 'us vs. them' mindset.

Since nobody knows what to believe anymore, we all need to build our own conclusions. This has created a high degree of anxiety and pessimism due to all the negativity that continues to flow from the media.

A key tenant of the Terminal Value mission is to bring attention to the people and organizations who are working to make things better.

Ultimately, Terminal Value is an ongoing discussion about the future value of ideas and entities in our current world.

    About Doug - Growing up in Gresham

    About Doug - Growing up in Gresham

    This week's podcast episode is a little more personal - It's about Doug.
    Doug grew up in a suburb of Portland, OR called Gresham. Doug talks about some of the formative experiences that shaped his personal and career perspectives.
    Much of his life perspective was shaped by the need to be frugal throughout his early life. To achieve personal and family goals, there was a culture of sacrificing luxuries and stretching resources.
    Doug's business specializes in partnering with companies and non-profits to capture overhead cost savings without layoffs to fund growth and strengthen financial results.
    Schedule time with Doug to talk about your business at www.MeetDoug.Biz

    • 22 min
    Interest Rates and Housing Inventory with Jason Hartman

    Interest Rates and Housing Inventory with Jason Hartman

    Doug and Jason discuss the impact of interest rates on the housing market and the impacts that will unfold when interest rates inevitably begin to rise.
    Doug's business specializes in partnering with companies and non-profits to capture overhead cost savings without layoffs to fund growth and strengthen financial results.
    Schedule time with Doug to talk about your business at www.MeetDoug.Biz
    >
    [Music]
    [Introduction]
    Welcome to the terminal value Podcast where each episode provides in depth insight about the long term value of companies and ideas in our current world. Your host for this podcast is Doug Utberg, the founder and principal consultant for Business of Life, LLC.
    [Sponsorship]
    Doug: Today's episode of the terminal value podcast is being brought to you by Podcorn. So for those of you who don't know, podcorn is a platform that aligns podcasters with sponsors so that people who are looking to get the word out for their brand can sponsor podcast episodes and so that podcasters can start to monetize their podcasts. And this is actually a really great pairing because the platform is super easy to use and it helps podcasts get themselves off the ground by offsetting your production costs and helping to pay to promote your podcast. What podcorn is really doing is getting the word out for independent voices such as myself and possibly such as you. If you've ever thought about getting your own podcast going head on over to podcorn.com and check it out. It'll be worth your time. So now onto the show.
    [Music]
    Doug: Welcome to the terminal value podcast. I am Doug Utberg and I have Jason Hartman on the line and this will also actually be on the creating wealth podcast which is Jason's podcast that has far more listeners than mine does at this current juncture. Of course Jason also has about a 13-year head start. So I've actually.
    Jason: Actually 15 years. Yeah so, so don't feel bad Doug nobody listened to my show in the beginning either.
    Doug: Yeah, exactly. Yes, he's a 15-year overnight success in the podcasting.
    Jason: Exactly.
    Doug: But I've actually known Jason for a really long time. He runs an extremely successful investment real estate company, but he does it a little differently because a lot of people like to invest in real estate in their own state but he you know. He but when he started the company he was in California and everything in California was ridiculously expensive. So he came up with the idea of investing out of state for cash flow in areas that have much more reasonable prices and much more. I guess you'd say rational relationships between rent and values so that you could get decent cash flow. Jason let me stop talking for a second and let you introduce yourself to the audience.
    Jason: Yeah, good stuff thanks Doug and it's great to talk to you and we'll do this as kind of a co-interview. You've been on my show many many times over the years and we've talked about a lot of interesting macroeconomic concepts and you always have really interesting views and angles on things so anxious to dive in and talk about the market, the potential bubble, that some are talking about and just some macro issues and real estate and how they all tie together.
    Doug: Yeah, absolutely. Well and because I think the thing is right you know in my heart I'm a value guy. You know I'm a kind of born contrarian right. You know I'm an ardent believer that over the long term the hurt is always wrong. The problem is that long term can take a while to show up and so because you know. I think as you've said right with the current low interest rates. Just the there's basically a bull market that's happening in everything right. You know the equities are going to the moon. Real estate's going to the moon. You know, my you know my intuition is that this can't last forever but it probably will last a few more years.
    Jason: Yeah.
    Doug: Which i

    • 29 min
    Re-Discover Lost Creativity with Robert A Belle

    Re-Discover Lost Creativity with Robert A Belle

    Doug and Robert discuss the process of creativity and the balance that must be found in order to reclaim it.
    As we discuss, the key word is 'balance' ... most of us don't have the luxury of stopping our life to become creative. Unlocking our inner creativity requires finding a balance of daily life and new pursuits.
    Connect with Robert at: www.RobertABelle.com
    Doug's business specializes in partnering with companies and non-profits to capture overhead cost savings without layoffs to fund growth and strengthen financial results.
    Schedule time with Doug to talk about your business at www.MeetDoug.Biz
    >
    [Music]
    [Introduction]
    Welcome to the terminal value Podcast where each episode provides in depth insight about the long term value of companies and ideas in our current world. Your host for this podcast is Doug Utberg, the founder and principal consultant for Business of Life, LLC.
    Doug: Welcome to the terminal value podcast. This is Robert, we have on the line. Although his screen name just screen name on zoom does not say Robert so I had to I couldn't cheat I had to actually be had to remember and but what Robert focuses on is actually helping authors with book launches. But, what we were actually going to talk about today is really how um how authoring a book while some people kind of feel like it's maybe quaint or outdated is actually still a really important part of generating authority as a thought leader. So Robert don't let me talk the whole time definitely introduce yourself and let's yeah let's just kind of start a dialogue.
    Robert: Alright, great yes that's what happens when you have too many zoom accounts and you log into the meeting with a different one so that's that's on me. So I'm happy to be here. My name is Robert Bell, I professionally I'm a qualified accountant but I branched out to break through the spreadsheets. I am a speaker, I am an author, I'm a coach, I am all things transformational. My focus is just to help people who are busy and unsatisfied with life live very abundantly.
    Doug: And so that's actually I have a little bit of connection. There so my background is actually in finance and accounting particularly for technology companies and on the IT and systems side. So, It's kind of funny how yeah, there's just this inner desire to kind of break free from the spreadsheets. I mean, don't get me wrong I still like doing like doing detailed dorky analysis but uh but yeah there's definitely a lot of life outside of corporate IT accounts.
    Robert: Definitely, I can relate to that. I might, I still as I said carry the brand of an accountant although, I'm a champion of creativity now which is like the other end of the spectrum but I still carry my badge very proudly because you know what I believe that you know our professions, our qualifications, they're just one aspect of identity. So it's not, you're not who you're not someone because of the profession you do you're someone because of what you do. So yes, I might be an accountant but I also create.
    Doug: Alright.
    Robert: So I'm a creative regardless whether I'm a content or engineer.
    Doug: That is, that's outstanding. Well, let's see. So let's actually kind of let's explore that a little bit kind of going from you know a traditional left brain linear type of role like finance or accounting or even like something like engineering. I think that would be another thing that would be very, very analogous into a more creative realm just because like for example if you're going to publish anything whether it's articles, blogs, books, videos, whatever there's a creative element and especially if you're trying to do it as an entrepreneur. You're good, you'll know by definition start off having to do a lot of it on your own. And so, in in your view what's the best way that somebody can go from hey I have a you know I have an adequate but boring linear job to

    • 30 min
    The Future of Capitalism with Mike Munger

    The Future of Capitalism with Mike Munger

    Doug and Mike talk about the current dynamics of capitalism in reference to his book: 'Is capitalism sustainable?'
    The core conflict Doug and Mike discuss is the fundamental conflict between public policy and private enterprise whereby there is an adverse incentive for business leaders to take advantage of government programs that are not broadly beneficial, but produce narrow benefits.
    The core conflict is that if these managers do not participate, their board of directors have every incentive to replace them with other managers who will.
    Doug's business specializes in partnering with companies and non-profits to capture overhead cost savings without layoffs to fund growth and strengthen financial results.
    Schedule time with Doug to talk about your business at www.MeetDoug.Biz
    >
    [Music]
    [Introduction]
    Welcome to the terminal value Podcast where each episode provides in depth insight about the long term value of companies and ideas in our current world. Your host for this podcast is Doug Utberg, the founder and principal consultant for Business of Life, LLC.
    Doug: Okay Welcome to terminal value podcast. I have Michael Munger on the line here. This is actually a little bit of a moment for me. Because I have actually been a long time listener to the econ talk podcast. Where Mike has been a regular and recurring guests and one of my favorite guests of course. I think one of the first episodes I listened to was with Milton Friedman and well you know it's hard to compete with Milton Friedman. But Mike here is a world-class okie dokie guy and he has written actually a number of books. But the one that I wanted to talk about today just as a part of the conversation is his book is capitalism sustainable. Because I’d like to talk about really what the future of capitalism looks like. And Mike I’d love to get your thoughts or just kind of tee up the conversation. But just what I’m seeing is that you know I think what people call capitalism really isn't capitalism. People think of capitalism as what we have in America and that is not the furthest thing from capitalism because you know for a work trip recently, I went to China and Shanghai. Let me tell you that is very far from what we have in America. But still it's what we have now is very not a free market. There are any number of things that are very tightly controlled and not allowed to freely float, largely just because of people's political fears. And so what I would love to get your input on is how does this project forward into the future? And is there a way that we can get to that vision of greater prosperity and opportunity for everybody. That capitalism pretends but has a very hard time delivering on due to the externalities and inevitable inequalities. So I’ve talked enough, please share your thoughts.
    Michael: We make a distinction to begin with between markets and capitalism. So markets is a system of allocation and production that uses prices as signals about the relative value of resources. And one of the things that's complicated about large societies is that they have to have institutions to reconcile all of the conflicting plans and purposes of individuals. So I think I want to open a restaurant, you think you want to open a factory. We both want the same piece of land to do it, who should get it now? We could have a political process and vote on it, we could have some bureaucratic process. But in a market system then whoever will pay the most for it, must be about to create the largest value for society. So if I can use it for a restaurant and I expect the profits to come to that restaurant. Allow me to pay more for the property. Then you are going to make a cement factory and it’s not really going to produce that much profit. So profit is a price, it is a signal about the relative value of the activity to society. Because it says something about the consu

    • 30 min
    Building a Brand through Podcasting with Alex Sanfilippo

    Building a Brand through Podcasting with Alex Sanfilippo

    Doug and Alex have an excellent discussion about podcasting and using podcasts to build a brand.
    At first glance, it can seem like the podcast medium is too crowded. However, Alex breaks it down by filtering out the inactive podcasts and the ones with less than 10 episodes published.
    The net result is a much smaller community than you might imagine of active podcasts. This means that now is an exceptional time to launch your podcast and build a personal brand.
    You can reach Alex at www.PodMatch.com and his podcast: 'Creating a Brand'
    Doug's business specializes in partnering with companies and non-profits to capture overhead cost savings without layoffs to fund growth and strengthen financial results.
    Schedule time with Doug to talk about your business at www.MeetDoug.Biz
    >
    [Music]
    [Introduction]
    Welcome to the terminal value Podcast where each episode provides in depth insight about the long term value of companies and ideas in our current world. Your host for this podcast is Doug Utberg, the founder and principal consultant for Business of Life, LLC.
    Doug: Welcome to terminal value podcast. I have Alex. Okay Alex I might butcher your name so forgive me here is a snap snap leaf snap Leo.
    Alex: Not even close. But hey I love this because nobody ever gets close, so I love just listening somebody like hey can tell me how to say it I'm like I want to hear you try first. It's Sanfilippo and very few people get it.
    Doug: Okay yeah. Alright I utterly and completely butchered it well. Mine's not burgets, it's you know not quite as easy to butcher but I've certainly had many of my own experiences. But anyway.
    Alex: I'm sure.
    Doug: I'm here to talk with Alex just about the podcast medium and podcasting for brand building. And this is of course a chance for Alex to promote his brand as well because he is the founder of pod match which of course is a podcasting basically a matchmaking service to find podcast authors and podcast guests. So I think the you know of course I'm going to give Alex a chance to promote his brand because that's a part of what we all do when we run podcasts. But really just want to have open conversation just about the meaning of the podcast medium and really what it's doing to media. And I thought Alex in our pre you know our pre-interview chat one of the things he said that I thought was really really profound is that a lot of people are really just looking for kind of feeling like there's somebody to be around because you know we're all kind of stuck by ourselves so with this with the rolling lockdown. So I live in Oregon which is in which has kind of never really gotten out of the idea that nobody's allowed to go anywhere. And of course right anybody who's on the west coast it probably feels the same what number of other states have loosened up a bit but, yeah. Is this something I can only assume. This is something you've been noticing that a lot of people are just really feeling like they need to have some kind of voice in their life.
    Alex: Yeah. Interestingly enough. First off I'm so glad to be here Doug. Thanks, thanks for having me.
    Doug: No problem.
    Alex: And I did notice initially when all lockdown happened. I know this is not like a covid podcast or anything like that but I noticed there's about a 20 percent drop in podcast listenership and it wasn't just mine. I actually checked with some of the hosting providers. I have some relationships with the people that own them and they said in general was a big dip and they didn't think it was going to come back very quick and it jumped back really fast. And it's because the initial shock of wow I can't leave my home anymore or you know maybe being a little bit dramatic. There but like it was a lot harder to get out and see people. People realize that oh no I need to hear other people like I'm alone most of the day or I'm just around the few people th

    • 27 min
    Community Support Organizations with Emily Garrick-Steenson

    Community Support Organizations with Emily Garrick-Steenson

    Doug talks with Emily Garrick-Steenson about the role and importance of community support organizations such as Lutheran Community Services Northwest and 'A Family Place.' (https://my.captivate.fm/www.FamilyPlaceRelief.org (www.FamilyPlaceRelief.org))
    The importance of these organizations to the most vulnerable population in communities is often extremely high and easy to overlook.
    Public support programs are stretched thin across the country and community support organizations like LCS Northwest and A Family Place step in to address a critical gap in helping at-risk families to stay self-sufficient and avoid the need for state intervention at a very high cost to the taxpayers.
    Doug's business specializes in partnering with companies and non-profits to capture overhead cost savings without layoffs to fund growth and strengthen financial results.
    Schedule time with Doug to talk about your business at www.MeetDoug.Biz
    >
    [Music]
    [Introduction]
    Welcome to the terminal value Podcast where each episode provides in depth insight about the long term value of companies and ideas in our current world. Your host for this podcast is Doug Utberg, the founder and principal consultant for Business of Life, LLC.
    Doug: Welcome to the terminal value podcast. I have Emily Garrick Steenson with me, and she is with Lutheran Community Services Northwest. And she specifically works with a service out of the Newburgh area called a family place. And one of the many things that they do is they actually do early intervention to basically to help keep families together and to help families figure out how to, you know, basically how to avoid needing to go through the system. And being a financial guy. I actually heard her first presentation on this at the local chamber. And what really struck me is the amount of cost avoidance just the magnitude of cost avoidance that you can create by avoiding needing to send just one person through the system, you know, as by going through the system. I mean, like juvie rehab, those types of things, because in a lot of cases, those get funded, publicly funded, I apologize. I'm slipping over my tongue here. And they cost a lot of money that most municipalities just don't have. Emily, please introduce yourself and help everybody else learn what you've taught me just about how impactful community organizations can be.
    Emily: Sure. So, like Doug said, my name is Emily Garrick-Steenson. I am the marketing and events director for a specialist excuse me, for Lutheran Community Services Northwest and a family place. A family place is our program here in Yamhill County, not just Newburgh, but McMinnville. And we recently opened this year, a classroom in Sheridan, which is really exciting. And recently got to place a building on the property of the will of minus School District. So we are all across the county from the east most point to the west, which is really exciting.
    Doug: I'm just gonna, I'm just gonna do a quick stop there. And so that is that is Yamhill County in Oregon, for the listeners who are out of state or possibly out of the country so and for people who are not in the United States, or who are from the east coast, Oregon is a state that's way over on the west coast, sandwiched between California and Washington, I like to say there's a state between Seattle and San Francisco, and that's called Oregon. And that's what we both live.
    Emily: That’s true. And to be more specific, Yamhill County is known internationally as Oregon's wine country, which seems very posh and high end. But Yamhill County has this really unique mix of we play a little bit of suburbs to Portland, and the business community as well as bedroom community to people that work in the tech world for Intel, etc. But our specific county starts on the east end with that kind of bedroom community suburb feel, and goes all the way west into communit

    • 28 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
134 Ratings

134 Ratings

Alex J Sanfilippo ,

A great podcast on my schedule

This show brings great thought leaders to the stage, they share great practical information, then the show ends. Perfect length of episodes with just enough for me to continuously be learning! Love this show. 👍🏻👍🏻

FinancialMinion ,

Podcasts that truly provides terminal value!

I love the title, and the content is some of the most unique and insightful you’ll find in business!

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